#1 of 61 national parks in United States of America

Best trails in Zion National Park

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Looking for a great trail in Zion National Park, Utah? AllTrails has 109 great hiking trails, trail running trails, dogs no trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 45 moderate trails in Zion National Park ranging from 0.7 to 19 miles and from 3,661 to 7,463 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
Description

Zion National Park is a unique landscape of high cliffs, narrow canyons, and beautiful views. The park has many famous hikes. Angels Landing is an intense switchback trail with a truly spectacular view from atop of the canyon. Another famous hike is the unique Narrows "trail" which is a very long trek through a river nestled between a sheer canyon. Other notable trails include the East Rim Trail to the park's highest point, the slot canyon Subway Trail , and the family friendly, but equally beautiful Kayenta Trail. There is also the paved Emerald Pools trail and the more challenging backpacking West Rim Trail. Please note that several of the hikes in this park require permits. Please inquire prior to your visit. The park is open to visitors 24 hours a day, but please note that not all areas including the entrance and Visitors Center will be staffed, nor open. Please also take into account that there are seasonal closures of roads, trails, and other parks of the park. Shuttle buses do not run from late November to mid-February. Entrance Passes: Private Vehicle: $35. Valid for 7 days. Admits private, non commercial vehicle (15 passenger capacity or less) and all occupants to Zion National Park, including both the Zion Canyon and Kolob Canyon areas. Motorcycle: $30. Valid for 7 days. Admits one non-commercial motorcycle to Zion National Park, including both the Zion Canyon and Kolob Canyon areas. Per Person: $20. Valid for 7 days. Admits one individual with no car to Zion National Park, including both the Zion Canyon and Kolob Canyon areas. Typically used for bicyclists, hikers and pedestrians. Youth 15 and under are admitted free. Non-Commercial Organized Groups: Valid for 7 days. Organized groups such as Scouts, Rotary, Clubs, Youth Groups, Churches, Reunions, etc. that do not qualify for an Academic Fee Waiver are charged as follows: $35.00 Non-commercial vehicles with a vehicle capacity of 15 or less. $20.00 per person Non-commercial vehicles with a capacity of 16 or greater. Fees will not exceed the commercial fee for the same-sized vehicle. Youth 15 and under are free. Individuals or families with any valid Annual or Lifetime pass may use their pass for entry at the per person rate. Pass and photo ID must be present upon entry. Accessibility: : The Interagency Access Pass for free or discounted admission for US Citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities is accepted here. The Zion Canyon Visitor Center and Human History Museum are wheelchair accessible and have accessible bathrooms and drinking fountains. Orientation films include closed-captioning. All shuttle buses in the park are wheelchair accessible and can fit chairs under 45 inches long and 25 inches wide. Most Ranger-led programs are accessible and assistive listening devices are available by reservation for these programs. For driving personal vehicles up-canyon, there is a special parking permit available at the Visitor Center or Museum information desks. The Zion Lodge in Zion Canyon has four wheelchair accessible rooms and loaner wheelchairs available. It also has a mobility equipment accessible snack bar, auditorium, gift shop, bathrooms, and dining room. The Visitor Center Picnic Area and the Grotto Picnic Area are mobility equipment accessible with packed, level surfaces and accessible bathrooms. Watchman Campground has seven individual mobility equipment accessible camping sites and two accessible group sites. The amphitheater there has wheelchair accessible seating on the top row and there is a beach access route near campsite B56. Service animals must be on-leash throughout the park. Additional accessible trails and facilities information can be found here: https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm

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Map of trails in Zion National Park
Park information
Acreage:
146,597 acres
Contact
435-772-3256
Top trails (109)
#1 - Angels Landing Trail
Zion National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(9443)
Length: 4.4 mi • Est. 2 h 47 m
The Angels Landing Trail is a strenuous route in Zion National Park with steep drop-offs and very narrow sections. The technical route and incredible views of Zion Canyon make this hike the most popular in Zion. Start by parking at The Grotto Trailhead or taking the West Rim Shuttle to The Grotto shuttle stop. Begin by crossing a bridge over the Virgin River. The first 2-miles of the West Rim Trail are a well-maintained paved trail. Most of the path is sunny, but Refrigerator Canyon offers shade and often a cool breeze. Eventually, you’ll come to Walter's Wiggles, a set of 21 switchbacks that take their name from Walter Ruesch, Zion National Park’s first superintendent. The last half-mile (0.8 km) follows a steep and narrow ridge from Scout Lookout to Angels Landing itself, a fantastic observation point 1500 feet above Zion Canyon. Anchored support chains are attached along some sections of the sheer cliff to assist your way up and down the carved steps. You are rewarded with an excellent view of the main canyon at the top. Avoid standing near the edge at all times and do not hike the trail when it is wet, storming, or high winds are present. If you are afraid of heights, this trail is not recommended. Give yourself plenty of time to hike this trail before dark if starting late in the day. Although this is a popular hike all year round, summer afternoons can get extremely hot so it is recommended to visit in the spring and fall. The parking lot here fills up quickly so be sure to arrive early. The road to the trail is also closed periodically to limit the number of visitors.Show more
#2 - The Zion Narrows Riverside Walk
Zion National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(3404)
Length: 1.9 mi • Est. 45 m
The Narrows may close during extreme weather conditions (flash flood warnings). Please check conditions before visiting: https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/conditions.htm Walking through the water between high canyon walls as a nice way to cool off in Zion National Park. The Riverside Walk Trail is a relatively flat, easy paved out and back trail located at the end of the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive that travels alongside the Virgin River to the mouth of the Narrows. There are water filling stations at the trailhead where the shuttle buses drop off as well as restrooms. There are sandy areas near the end near the entrance to the Narrows where you can cool your feet in the cool waters. Go as far as you like up the river but step carefully, as the water can get chest-high in some places. Zion National Park has a shuttle system that operates in a loop and brings guests between the visitor center and various stops along the way. For a map, please visit Zion National Park's website. Accessibility: There are 4 designated handicapped-accessible spaces in the paved parking lot off of Zion Canyon Scenic Drive at the south end of the trail. All of them are van-accessible with striped access aisles. The trail surface is cement, smooth, and typically at least 3 feet wide. The most accessible portion of the trail is the first 0.4 miles northbound. This section has its own trail page: https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/utah/zion-riverside-walk The estimated grade is mostly gentle except for very steep (over 12%) uphill sections past about 0.4 miles when going north. Wheelchair/mobility equipment or stroller users may need assistance in the steeper sections or to avoid them for safety. If navigating with mobility equipment, a wheelchair, or stroller, visit https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm for additional information.Show more
#3 - Zion Canyon Overlook Trail
Zion National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(2397)
Length: 1.0 mi • Est. 42 m
This trail offers some of the most breathtaking views of Zion Canyon. The trail itself short and not steep. The trailhead is a collection of stone steps that ascend the stone ridge directly above north side of road, across the street from the parking lot. The trail passes through shaded alcoves with ferns and trees, across a planked boardwalk and through a moist grotto, and over bare slick rock, wandering its way to edge of impressive cliff overlook. The expanse of Zion Canyon is open before Overlook, with its monumental formations visible on either side of canyon. You can see the road as it switchbacks below the west end of the Mount Carmel Tunnel. The West Temple, Towers of the Virgins, Streaked Wall, and Beehives all make up part of this tremendous view. The East Temple rises directly above the Overlook, towering more than 2,200 ft above the canyon floor. The Great Arch lies recessed into the cliff-face below the Overlook, carving its way through eons into solid sandstone. This trail can be reached by following Highway 9, to east entrance of Mount Carmel Tunnel, directly below the East Temple Saddle. Parking area on south side, and trailhead is across street, on north side. Note you cannot make a left turn into the parking lot if traveling from the east, but there is parking along the road about a quarter mile before you reach the parking lot. This hike is one of Zion's highlights, don't miss it!Show more
#4 - The Watchman Trail
Zion National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(3277)
Length: 3.1 mi • Est. 1 h 41 m
The Watchman Trail is a great easy trail that is often overlooked by tourists going to the neighboring Angels Landing or the Narrows. It overlooks the entire Springdale area and is ideal for beginner hikers.Show more
#5 - Emerald Pools Trail
Zion National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(1401)
Length: 3.0 mi • Est. 1 h 12 m
SEASONAL CLOSURE: This area is subject to seasonal closure due to weather conditions. For more information, please visit https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/conditions.htm A paved trail to Lower Emerald Pool and from there a sandy and rocky trail to the Upper Emerald Pool at the base of a cliff. Trail starts from Zion Lodge, crosses bridge and paved trail leads to the Lower Emerald Pool and waterfalls - there are multiple pools here. From there a sandy and rocky trail climbs to the Upper Emerald Pool at the base of a cliff. A note of caution - more people have been killed on this trail than any other trail in the park - even Angel's Landing, so be careful!Show more
#6 - Zion Narrows Bottom Up to Big Springs
Zion National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1485)
Length: 9.4 mi • Est. 7 h 51 m
SEASONAL CLOSURE: This area is subject to seasonal closure due to weather conditions. For more information, please visit https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/conditions.htm Reserve your $1 shuttle bus pass on Recreation.gov well in advance because seats are limited. Shuttle tickets also go on sale at 9 am the day before the shuttle ticket is for. The Narrows is one of the most iconic day hikes in Zion National Park named for being the most narrow spot in Zion Canyon. As you hike through the blue water in the gorge, you will look up at rocky canyon walls a thousand feet tall as you walk through the Virgin River. Water levels can vary from ankle deep to chest high, and as with all slot canyons, caution should be used and the weather forecast should be checked. The most popular time to hike the narrows is late spring and summer when the water temperature is warm and the levels are lower. However, even at this time of year storms can cause life-threatening flash floods. Always check in with the rangers before hiking in a slot canyon. The Narrows may be closed during the spring when snowmelt raises the river too high. Fall will leave you with fewer crowds, but be aware of shorter days and cold water. This is the full bottom-up day-hike route of the Zion Narrows and you must turn around at Big Springs. Access after Big Springs is by permit only and continuing onward without a permit intrudes on campers and can incur a citation by rangers. Bring sturdy shoes with good ankle support that you don't mind getting wet, a walking stick or hiking poles, extra clothing layers for temperature changes, and a dry bag in order to make this hike an enjoyable experience. Show more
#7 - Scout Lookout Trail
Zion National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1900)
Length: 3.6 mi • Est. 1 h 27 m
The road to this trail closes periodically to reduce the limit the number of visitors. This is a popular paved trail that leads up to Scout Lookout. Don't let the pavement fool you, this trail can be very steep and difficult in some sections. The trail is also quite exposed, so visiting in either the morning or late afternoon will buy you some shade. After crossing Virgin River on a bridge, the trail turns right, and goes along the river for a bit. You'll then start climbing on a paved trail. The views of the canyon start to become incredible. There are some great photo opportunities along the way. You'll then reach some very tight steep switchbacks. After the switchbacks you'll be at Scout Lookout. Many daring people go beyond Scout Lookout to nearby Angels Landing.Show more
#8 - The Subway Trail
Zion National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(816)
Length: 9.1 mi • Est. 4 h 33 m
An NPS permit is required to access this trail: For updates: https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/thesubway.htm The Subway Trail can be accessed off of Kolob Terrace Road at the Left Fork Trailhead. The trail gets its name from the pipe-like gorge formed by the canyon walls of North Creek. This is a canyoneering tour through the left fork of North Creek. It is a long day hike to dinosaur tracks, keyhole falls, and the subway. The trail follows a the creek and hikers have to pass through creek in many locations along the hike. The trail is not maintained. It is recommended that you are either an experienced hiker or have an experienced hiker to guide you on this slot canyon trail, as unlike the Narrows, it is a semi-technical hike that can require rappelling and swimming through deep pools of cold water. The subway section of the trail can also be very slippery so proceed with caution. This hike starts from the bottom of the Subway Trail, however many hikers do this trail from the top down off of Wildcat Canyon Trailhead, as the bottom up route is much more difficult. This area can be prone to flash floods so be mindful of rain and talk to park rangers before heading out on your hike if you have any concerns. Show more
#9 - Observation Point via East Mesa Trail
Zion National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1081)
Length: 6.7 mi • Est. 3 h 10 m
4wd or all wheel drive is highly recommended to make it to the trailhead in your vehicle. Alternatively, you can park on the road before the trail gets rocky and hike in to the trailhead but it will increase the length of the route. This trail is really well maintained, well shaded as well, so you can take a break when needed. It ends at a beautiful observation point.Show more
#10 - Lower Emerald Pool Trail
Zion National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(1388)
Length: 1.4 mi • Est. 34 m
Easy trail in Zion National Park. Minor drop-offs. Paved trail leads to the Lower Emerald Pool and waterfalls. Connects to the Middle Emerald Pools Trail.Show more
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