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#8 of 60 national parks in United States of America

Best trails in Glacier National Park

17,376 Reviews
Looking for a great trail in Glacier National Park, Montana? AllTrails has 147 great hiking trails, trail running trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Gearing up for a challenge? There are 60 hard trails in Glacier National Park ranging from 3.5 to 92.9 miles and from 3,192 to 10,013 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
Description

An early addition to the National Park Service (park #10), Glacier National Park in Montana turned 100 on May 11, 2010. The park is immense, with 1 million acres (4,047 km2), 300 lakes and a reach of 1,584 square miles (4,103 km2). The park is considered the centerpiece of a vast region of protected land that includes some 16,000 square miles (41,440 km2). The park features some 700 miles of hiking trails and supports all manner of outdoor activities, such as biking, boating, fishing, and horseback riding. There are 13 campgrounds that allow for roughly 1000 campsites. Other accommodation options include hotels, inns, lodges and motels. Part of Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park, this park has over 50 remaining glaciers and 130 named lakes under the tall Rocky Mountain peaks. There are historic hotels and a landmark road in this region of rapidly receding glaciers. These mountains, formed by an overthrust, have the world's best sedimentary fossils from the Proterozoic era. For seasonal hours, see: https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/hours.htm Entrance Fees Entrance Fee by car - 7 day permit $35.00 (Winter Rate - $25.00, November 1 to April 30) This is a entrance fee for all persons traveling in a single, private, non-commercial vehicle (car/truck/van). The permit is non-transferable. Visitors can enter the park at any time, if the entrance station is not staffed, a self-registration area is available for purchasing a 7-day park permit. Entrance Fee - single entry $20.00 (Winter Rate - $15.00, November 1 to April 30) This is a per person entrance fee for a visitor traveling on foot, bicycle, or for individuals traveling together in a vehicle as a non-commercial, organized group. The permit is non-transferable. Entrance Fee by motorcycle $30.00 (Winter Rate - $20.00, November 1 to April 30) This is a per motorcycle entrance fee. The permit is non-transferable. Accessibility: The Interagency Access Pass for free or discounted admission for US Citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities is accepted here. The Visitor Centers are wheelchair accessible and have accessible bathrooms and drinking fountains. Many of the videos at the visitor centers include closed-captioning and assistive listening devices are available. Accessible Ranger-led programs are marked on the Ranger-led Activities Schedule. Many of these presentations include auditory and tactile experiences. ASL services may be available for Ranger programs with advanced request. All shuttle buses in the park are wheelchair accessible. The following evening performance venues are accessible: Apgar Campground Amphitheater, Fish Creek Campground Amphitheater, Many Glacier Hotel and Campground Amphitheater and Auditorium, Lake McDonald Lodge Amphitheater, St. Mary Visitor Center Amphitheater, and Rising Sun Campground Amphitheater. There are two designated accessible camp sites at the Apgar Campground, one at the Avalanche Campground, eight at the Fish Creek Campground, one at the Two Medicine Campground, one at the Rising Sun Campground, two at the St. Mary Campground, two at the Bowman Campground, one at the Kintla Lake Campground, and one at the Sprague Creek campground. Service animals must be on-leash throughout the park. Additional accessible trails and facilities information can be found here: https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm

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Map of trails in Glacier National Park
Park information
Acreage:
1,013,572 acres
Contact
(406) 888-7800
Top trails (147)
#1 - Avalanche Lake via the Trail of the Cedars
Glacier National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(2673)
Length: 5.7 mi • Est. 2 h 48 m
NOTE: Parts and all of this trail can be closed due to Grizzly bear activity during the summer months. Please exercise caution and visit the park page before planning your trip. On a busy weekend, be prepared to park elsewhere and walk to the trailhead, as the park officials may be limiting parking. Please check with the park for more information. Also this trail may be closed periodically because of bears. Start south of Avalanche Gorge Footbridge on Trail of Cedars; gradual climb through old growth cedars and hemlock forest along roaring stream to glacial melt lake fed by waterfalls from the surrounding bowl, wildlife - deer, bear. May be accessible if Going to Sun road is closed. Adjacent to Avalanche campground area. Avalanche campground in located in one of the most popular sections of Glacier National Park west of the Continental Divide. The campground is situated within old growth cedar and hemlock trees, keeping the area cool during the summer months. The campground accommodate tent and RV campers, however only 50 sites will accommodate vehicle lengths up to 26 feet. Potable water is accessible in the campground, and restroom facilities are equipped with flush toilets and sinks with running water. Bring your hiking boots and binoculars if you are staying at Avalanche Campground. Two popular day hikes, Trail of the Cedars, and Avalanche Lake, afford visitors spectacular scenery and glimpses of birds and wildlife that inhabit the area. Plant enthuisiasts will appreciate the diverse species of flora.Show more
#2 - Highline Trail: Logan Pass to Granite Park Chalet
Glacier National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(865)
Length: 14.9 mi • Est. 7 h 44 m
The High-Line trail runs from the Logan Pass Visitors Center to The Loop Trail Head along the Garden Wall. The first 7.6 miles of the trail in easy with gradual elevation climb. After Granite Park Chalet the trail drops 2,200 feet in 4 miles to the Loop Trail Head. Expect heavy traffic and be early if you plan to park at the visitors center. The trail in very narrow in some places with steep drop offs. There are three other trails that joint the Highland at Granite Park Chalet allowing of alternative hiking options.Show more
#3 - Hidden Lake Trail
Glacier National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(892)
Length: 5.3 mi • Est. 3 h 4 m
Note: Parts or all of this trail can be closed due to grizzly bear activity during the summer months. Please exercise caution and visit the park website before attempting this hike. Uphill hike from the top of Logan Pass to great surprise view of Hidden Lake, with option of hiking down to the lake. The trail to Hidden Lake Overlook begins from the west side of the Logan Pass Visitor Center. Trail starts at the back of the VC, veer right to the Hidden Lake Nature Trail TH. This hike traverses through alpine meadows known as the Hanging Gardens. Expect a lot of sun and wind at this high elevation. Also expect crowds - this is one of the most popular hikes in the park. Parking can also be an issue during peak tourist season, so start early if you can. The trail begins as a paved surface before turning into a raised boardwalk. At this elevation snow tends to linger around well into the summer. The boardwalk helps to keep hikers above the snow, slush, mud and rivulets. Once the snow melts, however, the Hanging Gardens becomes a carpet of wildflowers. Early into the hike, 8760-foot Clements Mountain dominates the view directly in front of you To the north on your right are some outstanding views of the Garden Wall, and to the northwest is 8180-foot Mt. Oberlin. After climbing a series of steps, about a half-mile from the visitor center, is the end of the boardwalk section. From here the trail shifts in the direction of 8684-foot Bearhat Mountain. 9125-foot Mt. Reynolds and 8016-foot Heavy Runner Mountain will be on the left. Even late into the season you most likely will have to cross over a couple of small snowfields as you proceed up to the overlook. You'll reach a small rise, and will then pass a couple of small ponds on your left. Just beyond this section, roughly 1.2 miles from the trailhead, hikers will reach the Continental Divide. At 1.35 miles you'll reach the Hidden Lake Overlook where you'll find outstanding panoramic views of the lake and surrounding mountains. From this vantage point Bearhat Mountain is the dominating feature above Hidden Lake. Looking towards the south you can even see Gunsight Mountain and Sperry Glacier in the far off distance. Mountain goats are fairly common in the area around the overlook. Also keep an eye out for bighorn sheep, marmots, and even wolverines. Grizzly bears are occasionally seen in this area as well. The bears lead to periodic closings of the trail. Please check with the park to determine the status of this trail. The trail continues for another 1.5 miles down to the shores of Hidden Lake, which sits at an elevation of 6375 feet. Along the way the trail drops almost 770 feet on a rough and steep decline. Show more
#4 - Hidden Lake Overlook
Glacier National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(762)
Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 9 m
Note: Parts or all of this trail can be closed due to grizzly bear activity during the summer months. Please exercise caution and visit the park website before attempting this hike.Show more
#5 - St. Mary and Virginia Falls Trail
Glacier National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(742)
Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 28 m
#6 - Trail of the Cedars
Glacier National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(555)
Length: 0.9 mi • Est. 21 m
Most people proceed along this loop starting with the eastern side. This trail can be done in tandem with Avalanche Trail. However, Avalanche trail may periodically be closed because of bears. Accessibility: This trail is a combination of boardwalk and paved sections, is mostly flat with a max grade of 5%, and is typically at least three feet wide.Show more
#7 - The Garden Wall
Glacier National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(439)
Length: 14.7 mi • Est. 8 h 17 m
#8 - Grinnell Overlook via Granite Park Trail
Glacier National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(285)
Length: 11.4 mi • Est. 7 h 6 m
Note: Parts and all of this trail can be closed due to Grizzly bear activity during the summer months. Please exercise caution and visit the park page before planning your trip. This trail seriously has everything - gorgeous wooded areas, steep and narrow climbs, huge meadows with wildflowers and deer and friendly marmots, ridiculously incredible views the entire way. Turn right at the granite park chalet when you see the closed sign if you want to get to the actual overlook! Please climb carefully to the top of the rocks if you want an almost 360 degree view! Hike through a mostly unshaded and sparse water trail. Great views though especially if you go all the way to the glacier overlook. Definitely worth the work.Show more
#9 - McDonald Creek Trail
Glacier National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(247)
Length: 5.6 mi • Est. 2 h 15 m
#10 - Granite Park via Highline Trail
Glacier National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(226)
Length: 11.2 mi • Est. 5 h 30 m
Note: Parts and all of this trail can be closed due to Grizzly bear activity during the summer months. Please exercise caution and visit the park page before planning your trip. Also there are no shuttles this year due to COVID-19 and only one side of GTTS is open. Show more
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