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This park has Guadalupe Peak, the highest point in Texas, the scenic McKittrick Canyon full of Bigtooth Maples, part of the Chihuahuan Desert, and a fossilized reef from the Permian.

This a must do. The view from the top is incredible. Make sure you leave your name in the book at the top!!!

One of my favorite hikes in Texas. I loved it so much I wrote an entire story about it, found here: http://willingnesstowander.com/willingness/posts/Guadalupe/

It is hard, but amazingly worth it. The views are great, the temperature not too bad, and the space is mostly to yourself.

One of the best in Texas. I wrote about the whole trail (and more about Gaudalupe) here: http://willingnesstowander.com/willingness/posts/Guadalupe_Peak/

Great hike with great friends! This is a beautiful part of Texas. I would highly recommend it! We did this in early June and would encourage plenty of water and food. It was really hot on the way down, but it was incredible! All of it!

This is my favorite place on Texas! Best hike with an actual oasis!

A great short-ish jaunt. You will see parts of the park not seen from peaks of El Capitan or Guadalupe. Worth it if you have a few hours to kill. Can be done much faster than avg hike time if needed

Awesome hike. Great views the entire way. Awesome sunrise. Completed with 10 year old daughter in around 7 1/2 hours from base to summit with lots of breaks and a long lunch at the top

Great hike! My wife and I set out at sunrise which allowed us to get almost all the way up with great shade. We are decently fit. We took our time on the way up, took several short breaks, and it took us 3.25 hours. We had a a short break on the top and then kept a healthy pace on the way down (pretty much no breaks) and it took about 2 hours to get back to the parking lot. It was pretty rocky most of the way. Trekking poles helped save our knees. Great views all the way up. Good shade spots scattered all the way to the summit. Really enjoyed this hike!

Very well maintained trail. Rough hike but well worth it. We camped overnight, got up in time to hike to the top and see the sunrise.

backpacking
19 days ago

Backpacking this trail is made much more difficult by the water requirements. This is a fairly steep trail, whichever side you start it from and there's also very little shade, regardless of which side you start from.

The best way to do this trail is to start early in the morning (during the warm season at least), so as to avoid the sun when doing your ascent up the mountains into the forest. If you start early enough, you can be through the incline before the sun comes up over the mountains.

I'd also recommend staying at Tejas. The sites there are not exposed to the strong winds that regularly hit GMNP.

My wife and I did the trail in three days, starting from Pine Springs. We went to Tejas the first day, then walked to Dog Canyon and back on the second day to get more water, finally we descended back to Pine Springs on the third day. This was a fairly difficult itinerary and I wouldn't recommend it to others, unless one really wanted a challenge.

Trail is maintained well, 4 hours to summit.

Pretty uneventful. The trail was paved and there wasn't much to see. The spring is just a little pond basically. We were there in May and there was no wildflowers and we didn't really see any wildlife. I would say to use your time elsewhere in the National Park unless you are looking for something super short and quick.

Very exhausting hike but well worth it - the view from the top is amazing. With each switchback the view just keeps getting better and better. The description says that the first 1-1.5 miles is the hardest, but I think it was all just very difficult. It's pretty much all switchbacks. Be prepared to work hard the entire trail. The trail is very rocky and is very difficult on the knees. I would highly recommend wearing boots with ankle support.

Most beautiful place yet. did this hike along with Smith Spring last year and cant wait to return.

Very rewarding an exhausting when I completed this last year. i am excited to do it again and I am sure my skill level has increased where the hike will be more enjoyable.

30 days ago

Pretty, well signed and easy to follow. I love this part of Texas!

hiking
1 month ago

All we had time for was this easy, paved .9 there & back trail. It takes you to the Butterfield Stage site. Liked the history. Scenery is good.

As tough as it is awesome. The incline, wind, and unstable rocky terrain are what make it difficult. There are definitely some tough stretches on this hike. I don’t recommend the hike in the heat as there are large portions with no shade. All that being said it is well worth your time. We hiked to the high camp with full packs and spent a couple of days up around the peak - no place like it.

Back packed 28-29 April 2018 with Boy Scouts preparing for Philmont. Tougher than any day we will have on our Philmont Trek. We backpacked from Pine Springs camp ground to Pine Top camp ground. Dropped packs and set up camp. We took day packs and completed the Bush Mountain Blue Ridge loop. We hauled in 6 liters each of water and used every bit of it. The map says 3.8 miles from the trail head to the intersection of Tejas and Bush Mountain trail. My Garmin said 4.3 miles when I checked both directions. Not sure that the map accounts for all the switch backs. We took three liters of water on the Bush Mountain to Blue Ridge loop. Definitely needed it for the young 14-year old scouts. The trail was rocky, especially clockwise to Bush Mountain. The trail got easier after we climbed down north side of Bush Mountain. The Tejas trail portion was shaded under pines and scenic.

1 month ago

Nice easy trail to warm up on after a long drive. Not challenging, but very interesting to learn about the area and the history.

The first mile and the last half mile are pretty rough. My knees aren't what they used to be, so I used trekking poles. If you decide to use them, use the rubber tips as the trail is mostly rock. The views at the top are spectacular and the climb is exhilarating! I used all trails and map my walk to record, all trails hit 8 miles even, map my walk hit 8.1. Coming down was more difficult for me due to the knee and scree, but manageable. I wore trail runners instead of hiking boots, but if I do it again I would opt for the ankle support over weight savings due to the loose rock. Bring sunscreen, easy to get burnt at the higher altitude.

The sunrise views were AMAZING

Amazing hike, best I have done in West Texas/southern New Mexico so far. Trail is well maintained and easy to follow. You can wear shorts if you choose, no bushwhacking involved. Great view at the top and there was just a slight breeze the entire time I hiked, even with a strong wind on the drive up. 1.5hrs up, 1hr down (jogged a good portion down).
The route is closer to 8mi round trip.

hiking
1 month ago

I really enjoyed this trail. It had a number of interesting views, before you get to the spectacular Devils Hall. Note: many of the rocks along the trail, particularly in the wash, are rather new rocks that afford you good traction. But be very careful getting overly confident with your foot placement, because a large number of the rocks have been there a long time and are as smooth as polished rock. This is especially true when you get to the ledge section of the river bed, before getting to the Devils Hall. There are lots of good hand holds and footholds at that section, but the rock surface has been worn smooth from all the times water has rushed down through it.

I really enjoyed hiking to the top of Texas' highest peak. Thank you very much to the people responsible for building and maintaining this well-maintained trail. Thank you also to whoever was responsible for putting the shiny metal monument marker at the top of the mountain. It was very cool having such a prominent marker at the top of the mountain. Note: near the top of the trail, well above the camping area, there's a section of the trail where you can take it to the left or the right, and both places and up back on the trail, but you should take the left way that has you go over bed rock to the opposite side of the ridge, rather than the right side (muddy) which takes you needlessly over a short but steep "up and down" back to the trail. Both ways work, but you can save yourself a bit of needless aggravation by taking the correct trail path that goes left at the spot,

hiking
2 months ago

Went up and back Tejas Trail. Not too hard I would say moderate on hiking level. Some some mule and a small lizard. Great hike. 4-14-18.

hiking
2 months ago

Kristen and I were first on the trail after gates opened at 8 am. Lots of scat. When you get to canyon the trees are amazing. Some water although looks like this may have been more in the past. Loved the Pratt cabin and the hunter cabin. Magic place.

Kristen and I went to top and back in under 4 hours. I agree it is more like a 9 mike hike. Trail is perfectly marked. Saw deer on hillside above us. One super windy section near the Guadalupe campground. Great hike. Great view.

hiking
2 months ago

Beautiful but strenuous trail.
The last 500 feet is rocky with a fair amount of scree. I fell at the top when my boot caught the edge of a rock. Five miles of hiking, 3000 ft of elevation and sixty mile trip to Carlsbad ER who, I might add, were very caring and did a great job stitching me up.
Everyone at the summit agreed and compared GPS’s, this is a 10 mile hike not 8.8, 9.2... that trail signs and books claim.

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