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A place of awe and wonder. These are the western slopes of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Towering rockwalls, spectacular waterfalls and soaring peaks earn the park its name; Yoho is a Cree expression of awe and wonder. Here in the shadow of the Great Divide are the secrets of ancient ocean life, the power of ice and water, and the stories of plants and animals that continue to evolve today. Yoho, named for a Cree word expressing awe, is a park of rock walls, waterfalls and glacial lakes. It's a park with snow-topped mountain peaks, roaring rivers and silent forests. It's a park whose history is bound up with a railroad: spiral tunnels inside mountains and stories of runaway trains. Established in 1886, the park currently spans 1,310 square kilometres (507 square miles) on the western slopes of the Rocky Mountains in British Columbia, and borders Banff National Park to the east and Kootenay National Park to the south.

12 days ago

I did the Emerald Lake Loop the last weekend of November. It was snowing heavily, but the trail was fairly well packed from plenty of foot traffic, making it easy to walk in the snow with a good pair of boots. (However, I'm sure it will be a snowshoe or cross-country-ski-only trail quite soon with all the snow falling at Emerald Lake.) The trail was beautiful and an easy walk. Plaques along the walk had colourful descriptions about the landscape, glacier, and lake. I spent two hours doing the loop at a comfortable pace through the snow with plenty of stops for photos. And, I only saw one other group on the trail at this time of year. Though I had planned to hike up Emerald Basin, the falling snow was already too deep and making the trail hard to see and navigate; I'll have to return in the summer to enjoy that part of the hike.
I highly recommend the loop for short and easy, yet beautiful walk.

snowshoeing
23 days ago

hiking
24 days ago

hiking
1 month ago

A must hike if you are into fossils and also beautiful scenery. This hike starts around the Takakkaw Falls and pretty much follows the Iceline Trail until little Yoho Lake. From there you have another couple of hours until you reach the Walcott Quarry. This is a guided hike only as the area is restricted and monitored being a UNESCO world heritage site for one of the best hard & soft body parts fossil preservation of Cambrian marine animals from 540 million years ago. Our guide was a geo-physicist from the Burgess Shale Geo-Foundation ( they organise the hikes) and her wealth of knowledge was unbelieveable. It is a long hike (22km) and a long day. We had snow, sun,showers, wind etc so be prepared and extra layers of clothing + good hiking shoes are recommended.

Beautiful. Lots of tourists. You oh can go pretty close to the falls but you ll get soaked so waterproof what you need. Good hiking shoes as it can be slippery

hiking
1 month ago

Great alternative to the Takakka falls which we're closed. The hike is really easy, and the falls are incredible.

hiking
1 month ago

walking
2 months ago

walking
2 months ago

Great hike with gorgeous view. Drive as far down the road as you can, there is parking at the end and it really cuts down on the the supposed length that some sites quote.

hiking
2 months ago

hiking
2 months ago

hiking
2 months ago

hiking
2 months ago

Beautiful hike on Sept 24th with great sunny sky. Hiked clockwise with stunning views of the aqua blue lake and rocky snowy peaks all around. After tracking past the lake the hike took us past rocky river bed until we started the ascent. Wonderful views of the waterfall towards the left. Once we started on the second part of triangle the views were spectacular and path took us past rocky cliffs. Saw about a dozen mountain goats grazing. Once past the peak on the third leg of the hike the switchbacks down were never ending...but beautiful. We have hiked all over the US and Canada and this hike was in our top three ever. Would do again.

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