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#4 of 67 provincial parks in British Columbia

Best trails in Mount Seymour Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada

2,950 Reviews
Looking for a great trail in Mount Seymour Provincial Park, British Columbia? AllTrails has 33 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 20 moderate trails in Mount Seymour Provincial Park ranging from 2.1 to 6.7 miles and from 59 to 4,557 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Mount Seymour Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
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Top trails (33)
#1 - Mount Seymour Trail
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(640)
Length: 5.1 mi • Est. 3 h 20 m
On a clear day this 8 km round trip trail offers hikers stunning views of the lower mainland and the surrounding mountains. The trail traverses three peaks ending at Mount Seymour Summit which offers a spectacular panoramic view of the area. This is a great day hike for those looking for something well marked but less touristy than the Grouse Grind or Lynn Canyon Park. The trail starts at the Mount Seymour Ski area at the last parking lot from the entrance. Keep driving to the end where there is a map at the trail head. During the summer parking is $3 that can be paid with a credit card or change. At the trail head make sure to read the notices for the conditions off the trails because parts of the trail can remain snow covered into August. From the trail head you will see a number of signs to the various trails. The best path to start the hike forks left off the main road. The trail steady inclines to Brockton point revealing the first of many spectacular views of Vancouver. The path continues upward steadily until the trail forks to Elsay Lake, make sure to follow the trail left as the Elsay Lake trail is much more challenging. Here the path winds through the rocks to First Pump Peak and is well marked, just make sure to look for the orange markers at each turn. Many decide to turn back after first peak but those who continue to Mount Seymour peak get a much better view of the mountains to the north. Second pump peak is clearly visible from the first peak and the trail is easy to navigate. The trail between the second peak and Mount Seymour Peak is the most difficult part of the hike as the trail cuts down northwest side of second peak. If covered in snow in snow or ice it may not be possible to pass without proper equipment. After scrambling up the southwest side of the third peak hikers are rewarded with a spectacular view of the area. Taking some time to absorb the view then follow the same trail back to the parking lot.Show more
#2 - Dog Mountain Trail
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(762)
Length: 3.5 mi • Est. 1 h 13 m
Note: Users recommend microspikes and poles during the snowy season. A popular, well marked trail. It is rated moderate only because of all the exposed roots caused by the heavy traffic. But it is still a relatively flat, easier trail with only minor rolling elevation changes. Children will be well suited here but the youngest could have difficulties with the exposed roots. There are also a lot of dogs on this trail. Show more
#3 - Pump Peak
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(300)
Length: 4.2 mi • Est. 2 h 45 m
#4 - Mystery Lake and Mystery Peak
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(179)
Length: 3 mi • Est. 1 h 46 m
Of all the many lakes along the North Shore, Mystery Lake is arguably the most beautiful and photogenic. It is very popular with swimmers in the summer and for good reason. The water is crystal clear, the lake is surrounded by rock bluffs, and there are several small rock islands you can swim between. The actual trail to the lake is somewhat exposed to the sun with varied terrain ranging from muddy to rocky. Unfortunately, Mystery Peak behind the lake does not share the same beauty. The main trail to the peak on the West side is simply a gravel service road leading to a chairlift at the top. There is a very small rock bluff at the highest peak but the views are not as impressive as all other nearby peaks. On your return from Mystery Peak, there is another rough, muddy section of the Mystery Lake Trail on the East side that will allow for a loop back to the lake.Show more
#5 - Mount Elsay
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(46)
Length: 7.4 mi • Est. 5 h 37 m
This is a difficult hike. Entry requires a BCParks Day Use pass. Show more
#6 - De Pencier Bluffs via Upper Perimeter Route
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(53)
Length: 4.3 mi • Est. 1 h 44 m
De Pencier Bluffs and the Upper Perimeter Route are both relatively unknown and lightly traveled; a bit unfortunate as this duo offers so much. This hike begins on the Old Cabin trail across from the parking lot and then continues on to the Perimeter Trail. But the real adventure starts when you turn off onto the Upper Perimeter Route. This is a completely unmaintained and unsanctioned route. There are at least thirty large trees that have fallen across the trail, safety signs laying smashed on the ground, and a broken but usable bridge. The trail also becomes very steep as you approach De Pencier Bluffs. However, none of this should be taken as a negative. Anybody who enjoys getting off the beaten path will love this trail. Please note that the city park sign pole now calls the Upper Perimeter Route the Dead End trail; probably to discourage casual hikers. The Bluffs at the end are huge and you could spend 30 minutes just exploring the top. The views of the city to the South as well as Mount Baker are amazing as you would expect. But even more impressive are the views of the mountain ranges to the North and East making this a great hike for photographers. Show more
#7 - Three Chop, Old Buck and Baden Powell Trail Loop
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(81)
Length: 4.3 mi • Est. 1 h 23 m
With an elevation high point of 630 metres and considerable variety amongst the trails, this loop is a great choice for an early or late shoulder season hike.  This section of the Baden Powell Trail is a smooth gravel path that is almost flat and a relatively easy walk. The Old Buck Trail is also constructed with gravel but slightly rougher with a gentle, gradual elevation change throughout it's length. The Three Chop Trail offers essentially the opposite experience as it is completely natural, unmarked and unmaintained. There are no bridges or manmade alterations of any kind. Although still only moderate in difficulty, several sections are quite rugged, muddy and steep. Deadfall also crosses the trail at several points and creeks must be navigated via rocks.  Like most loops, this one can be hiked in either direction but almost everyone will likely prefer a counter clockwise direction. This will allow for ascension of the steeper Three Chop Trail and an easier walk downhill on the Old Buck Trail. As the hike is under deep forest cover throughout, there are no distant views. Parking is usually no issue for this hike as the medium sized lot at the trailhead on Mount Seymour Rd will almost always have space.Show more
#8 - Suicide Bluffs and Dog Mountain Loop
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(48)
Length: 3.8 mi • Est. 1 h 32 m
Suicide Bluffs trail is an unsanctioned trail with numerous signs stating danger, steep drop offs, etc. But the trail is very clearly defined with professional signs and markers all along the way. As long as you stay on the Alltrails trail, you will also be rewarded with this a beautiful trail and its views. From the two peaks, the 360 views are amazing. The trail has many steep sections up and down with numerous chains for assistance. And unlike the Dog Mtn trail, it has no mud or roots. Very clean, green, and unworn. Once you complete the Suicide Bluffs trail, you can take a break at Dog Mountain before completing the loop via the Dog Mtn trail. Show more
#9 - Old Buck, Baden Powell, and Bridle Trail Loop
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(71)
Length: 3.8 mi • Est. 2 h 14 m
Note: As of December 2020, it is reported that last section of trail back to car park closed however there are detours. More information here: https://bcparks.ca/explore/parkpgs/mt_seymour/ Off Baden Trail, it comes down to a mountain bike path which is steep with cliffs. Hikers need to be wary of bikers coming down as the trail can get narrow at times. Show more
#10 - Elsay Lake Trail
Mount Seymour Provincial Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(33)
Length: 12.5 mi • Est. 7 h 39 m
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