hiking

wildlife

forest

views

lake

birding

nature trips

walking

camping

backpacking

trail running

wild flowers

no dogs

The largest island in Lake Superior and one of two parks not accessible by road, this least-visited park is a site of isolation and wilderness. It has many shipwrecks, waterways, and hiking trails. The park also includes over 400 smaller islands and the waters up to 4.5 miles (7.2 km) from the island. There are only 20 mammal species and it is known for its wolf and moose relationship.

backpacking
7 days ago

Coming off of the Greenstone Ridge it's very steep and rocky with lots of switchbacks. I almost didn't do this trail because of the "hard" rating. I'm so glad I did anyway! It was my favorite part of Isle Royale. I'm an intermediate hiker at best in average shape. I didn't think it was that bad. The campsites are spectacular! Saw a black fox and moose tracks. The loon calls are magical. Getting back up on the ridge is a little tough but doable and totally worth it.

This is a great hike- we did an entire loop of 48 miles back to rock harbor, but a stop at Moskey basin is a must. There were huge white swans and tons of otters! It was a great place to take a break and relax. The night before we stayed at Daisy Farm which was a luxury because there were shelters. My now husband actually proposed to me at Daisy Farm, so I love it there a bit more because of it. Overall, it's a gorgeous hike! We had a blast and would do it again in a heart beat.

Nice trail with great views. A ranger recommended this route in lieu of the Rock Harbor trail as being easier, being the end of our trip. We started from the Three Mile campground, went along the Rock Harbor trail, crossed over to the Tobin trail at the connection at Suzy's Cave, and then continued to Rock Harbor for the ferry, which gave us views from both trails. The Tobin trail's ease (less rocky) was welcome at the conclusion of five days of hiking with full packs and two kids.

Great trail between the Daisy Farm campground and the Greenstone ridge; lots of moose habitat along the trail. We descended the trail from the Greenstone ridge on our way to the campground. Noting the habits we passed, we got up early the next morning and hiked part way back up the trail for (successful) moose watching. Descent/ascent of the trail us very doable -- fairly gradual and not very steep.

I hiked the trail from Windigo to the Daisy Farm Trail in July. 95% of the time, you're surrounded by trees and mosquitos with none of the scenic views people keep raving about. The trail is steep and muddy. The kind of mud that's unavoidable to get through, knee deep, and sucks your boots off. I had bug bites the size of my fist on my legs, and I wore permethrin treated long pants plus insect repellent lotion on my skin.

There's no water source on the trail and no campgrounds either. This particularly is problematic because you're either going to be weighed down by extra water as you go up and down steep hills or you're going to be very dehydrated from all the physical exertion on a trail that gets very hot after 1pm. Temps ranged from 32 to 85F when I was there.

I actually enjoyed my side trips off the Greenstone to either side of the island along Lake Superior. But the Greenstone itself is awful.

hiking
1 month ago

Easy hike to the top of a hill that overlooks a creek and pond. Got to see a moose drinking from the stream!

Great trail through the woods. You end up on a (Minong) ridge and get an amazing view of the surroundings. Got to see a moose on my way just after the second turn-ff for Hugginin.

hiking
5 months ago

Greenstone Ridge is the most beautiful trail I have ever been on. The seclusion and untouched wilderness can't be matched. And seeing a couple moose was pretty cool too.

Hiked the Greenstone from Windigo to Rock Harbor. Very beautiful with views of Lake Superior and Canada, plus all the lake on Isle Royale. Harder than I thought it would be with all the elevation changes but worth it.

backpacking
Tuesday, August 16, 2016

2 mile trail back to the south side of the island from Greenstone ridge. Tough hiking on the northern half as you're traveling down hill for a while. I took this trial on my last day in Isle Royale and was moving quickly as I was ready to try and catch a ferry to leave. I recall this trail about midway became hard to identify. We ended up hiking 100 meters or so in the wrong direction at one point. I don't recall any water sources on the northern half of the trail but there is some on the southern half.

backpacking
Tuesday, August 16, 2016

The southern half the 2.4 miles trail is pretty tough as it is coming off of Greenstone Ridge. Not the most scenic of the trails but it takes you to a nice camping area in Lane Cove. The camping area in my opinion is the highlight of this hike. You'll be right on the water with a chance to get into Lake Superior. (extremely cold water btw) The red foxes and squirrels in Lane Cove will steal your food so watch out. :)

I backpacked this trail from Mt. Ojibway to Lane Cove trail. (2.8 M) Near this intersection it is Mount Franklin. This lookout provided me my greatest memory of the entire trip to Isle Royal. It was between 10PM -midnight which I first saw the Northern Lights or the Aurora Borealis. Simply unforgettable. As mentioned below, there is no access to water in this area so make sure you carry more than what you think you'll need. Enjoy.

backpacking
Tuesday, August 16, 2016

1.7 mile hike from daisy farm camping area. The tower at the north end of the trial provides the longest and best views and a great place to have lunch. (by far the highlight of the trail. If I recall you can see the Michigan's Upper Peninsula from the tower to the south and Canada to the north. One of the highlights from my trip.

backpacking
Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Trail is accurately described below. It's not the premiere trail of Isle Royal but a good place to start as it connects with the harbor and ferry. Daisy farms is a roughly 8 miles into this trial and is a great place to stop for the night. Backpacking isn't the only way to experience this trail as canoes and kayaks are available to rent and you can follow the trail on the water.