Best trails in Wales

9,043 Reviews
Ready to check out the best trails in Wales? AllTrails has 927 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 404 moderate trails in Wales ranging from 0.6 to 97.6 miles and from 0 to 3,477 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Wales
Top trails (927)
#1 - Snowdon via Miner's Track and Pyg Track
Snowdonia National Park
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Length: 7.5 mi • Est. 4 h
Circular route from the car park at Pen-y-Pass youth hostel in Snowdonia National Park. Take the Pyg Track and Llanberis path to the top of Snowdon (the highest mountain in Wales), and return via the Miners Track back to Pen-y-Pass. The Pyg Path will give you an easier ascent. Parking can be difficult - we recommend arriving early! You will need to pay for parking on the side of the road unless you get further away from the trailhead. Follow all signs as tickets are sometimes given here. The Bwlch Glas section is the toughest part of this trail and should be treated with respect. Keep strictly to the path. There is a visitor centre at the summit of Snowdon. Stunning views from the top! In Welsh folklore, the summit of Snowdon is said to be the tomb of the giant Rhitta Gawr who wore a cloak made of men's beards, and was slain by King Arthur after claiming Arthur's beard. According to legend, Arthur had Bedivere throw his sword Excalibur into Glaslyn, where Arthur's body was later placed in a boat to be carried away to Afallon. Glaslyn was also said to be the final resting place of a water monster, known as an afanc, which had plagued the people of the Conwy valley. They tempted the monster out of the water with a young girl, before securing it with chains and dragging it to Glaslyn. Show more
#2 - Pen y Fan Circular Walk
Brecon Beacons National Park
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Length: 10.5 mi • Est. 5 h 14 m
Pen y Fan is one of the most popular peaks in the Brecon Beacons National Park, and you have some options for customizing your hike. To hike the route shown here, park in the Owl’s Grove car park and cross the road into Taf Fechan Forest. Take the bridge across the stream and then make a left along the river. You will cross a stone bridge and then come to a fork. Take the trail on your right (it is a bit more rugged) and you will merge with Taff Trail. Your hike gains elevation as you hike up and out of the trees and into the vast open moorland. You will see the Lower Neuadd Reservoir and the Brecon Beacons horseshoe ridgeline. The highest point in this area is the Pen Y Fan. You will eventually make a left so that you walk behind Cribyn. You remain on the Taff Trail and climb to the summit of Pen y Fan. The views from this point are the main attraction of this hike (and you will likely see others if you go on a clear day). On cloudy days, this may not be the best choice for a hike as you will miss out on the incredible views. To complete the loop, hike back down towards Corn Du, Craig-Gwaun-Taf, and the Neuadd Valley. You will re-enter the forest, and emerge at the lower reservoir. Locate the small building and walk behind it until you see the much larger building. Walk in front of this larger building, pass through a gate and then walk on a narrower road until you can reunite with the Taff Trail. You will notice that the bottom part of our route here does not return quite the way you came. This is to allow for a detour to the The Old Barn Tea Room where you can stop for some coffee or tea.Show more
#3 - Snowdon via Llanberis Path
Snowdonia National Park
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Length: 9.1 mi • Est. 5 h 41 m
The Llanberis Path is a popular first time path for climbing Mount Snowdon. It’s the longest route but provides a gradual climb up to the summit of Snowdon. Start from the car park at Dolbadarn Castle, in Llanberis. After close to half a mile you will see the Llanberis Falls on your right hand side. Half way through your ascent you will find a place to stop for tea or coffee, aptly named Halfway House. Please respect the mountain and keep to the paths for your safety, and also to protect the ecological balance.Show more
#4 - Ystradfellte Four Waterfalls Walk
Brecon Beacons National Park
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Length: 4.5 mi • Est. 1 h 49 m
This is a great trail with stunning scenery and access to four waterfalls near Ystradfellte in the Brecon Beacons National Park. Starting from Gwaun Hepste car park the trail follows the Afon Mellte. The waterfalls you visit on this route are Sgwd Uchaf Clun Gwyn, Sgwd Isaf Clun Gwyn (2), and Sgwd yr Eira on the Afon Hepste. This trail can be steep at some points especially when walking down to see the waterfalls but overall breathtakingly beautiful. Good boots for slippery surfaces are recommended. Show more
#5 - Pen y Fan from A470
Brecon Beacons National Park
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Length: 3.9 mi • Est. 2 h 34 m
The Pen y Fan and Corn Du trail offers spectacular, unrivalled views of the beautiful Welsh countryside in the Brecon Beacons National Park. Pen y Fan is the highest mountain in South Wales, and a popular destination for walkers. Pen y Fan is translated from the Welsh language to mean ‘top of this place’. The mountain and surrounding area are owned by the National Trust. Pen y Fan, together with Corn Du (trans. Black Horn), it’s secondary summit, was previously named Cadair Arthur, meaning (King) Arthurs Chair. Whilst there are no stories directly linking King Arthur to Pen y Fan, legend has it that Arthur once helped the people of Brecon with a group of wild boars. The King killed the boars’ leader, whose body rolled down into the river, today known as Afon Twrch (river of the boar). Start from the Pont ar Daf car park just south of the Storey Arms. The summit of Pen y Fan is marked by a well preserved and structured Bronze Age cairn which would have originally held the ashes or other remnants of a dead person or persons since multiple burials together are common in the British Bronze Age. From the summit on a clear day the Bristol Channel (including the islands of Flat Holm and Steep Holm), Carmarthen Bay, Swansea Bay, the Gower Peninsula, the Black Mountains, the Cambrian Mountains, Exmoor, the town of Brecon and much of Mid Wales and the South Wales Valleys, and in a north-easterly direction the Clee Hills in South Shropshire can be seen.Show more
#6 - Snowdon via Watkin Path
Snowdonia National Park
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Length: 7.9 mi • Est. 5 h 46 m
Lovely trail up the Watkin path recommended to anyone with reasonable level of fitness and adequate clothing. The views are amazing ! The clear blue lagoons with waterfalls, the wildlife and the landscape will take your breath away. This is a true adventure but pay attention, the trail is a steady ascent and near the top it becomes steeper and requires some scrambling over loose rock. Nothing too difficult in dry weather but not recommended for beginners and could become dangerous in wet weather. Relatively quiet path compared to the more popular routes, although the summit itself was still very busy. Definitely recommended for an alternative route up or down the mountain! Show more
#7 - Cadair Idris Circular Walk
Snowdonia National Park
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Length: 5.6 mi • Est. 3 h 15 m
Cadair Idris is situated in the Cadair Idris Nature Reserve within Snowdonia National Park. Set off from the Tal-y-Llyn car park at Minffordd and climb uphill through the woods with the fast flowing Nant Cadair stream cascading down on the right. On exiting the wood, continue on the easy-to-follow footpath on the left of the stream & fork left onto Minffordd Path. Ascend through the wide Nant Cadair valley to the awesome Llyn Cau lake & continue up the left side of the Llyn Cau, the path up is well marked and steep, to the horseshoe of cliffs and crags known as Craig Cau, that surround Llyn Cau. The first part of this ascent is quite hard but once on top of the horseshoe it's rough terrain but not too steep and you can follow the path which is well marked with rock piles. The final climb to the Penygadair (893 metres) summit is covered in some huge boulders which were quite a challenge. The final section of the path is steep, slippery and suffering badly from erosion. A short zigzag finally brings you to the summit cairn and trig point. From Penygadair summit head northwest across the flat barren top to Mynydd Moel (863 metres) summit. Return to the fence previously crossed, then turn left to follow the fence line downhill. The path becomes steep and quite rocky and very uneven in places following the path to meet Nant Cadair stream at the corner of the pine forest. There are many myths and legends concerning Cadair Idris (meaning Idris Chair). The name comes from the legend of Idris the giant warrior poet of Welsh legend who is said to have created his seat to view the heavens from this lofty point. Another tale when tells how those who dare to sleep on its slopes overnight will awake either a madman or a poet! Others claim that Cadair Idris is the hunting ground of Gwyn ap Nudd, lord of the Celtic Underworld ‘Annwn’, who is escorted by a pack of supernatural red-eared hounds that herd a person’s soul into the underworld… According to folklore, Llyn Cau, the stunning glacial lake on Cadair Idris, is not only bottomless, but the home of a Welsh water dragon, which once lived elsewhere and terrorised the locals. King Arthur is said to have captured it, tied it behind his horse and dragged it up the mountain to release it in this lake.Show more
#8 - Llyn y Fan Fach, Llyn y Fan Fawr, and The Carmarthen Fans
Brecon Beacons National Park
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Length: 9.4 mi • Est. 5 h 25 m
Very scenic trail. If you want to finish the whole trail make sure to leave yourself plenty of daylight. Most of the path is dry and solid but there are some bits that are a little wet. You can see snow at the side of the mountains in Winter, no snow on the paths.Show more
#9 - Snowdonia Slate Trail
Snowdonia National Park
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Length: 88.5 mi • Est. Multi-day
This is a long distance footpath around Northern Snowdonia starting from Bangor. It passes through the main areas and heritage sites associated with the slate industry, and of course the beautiful rugged terrain on Snowdonia National Park. There are plenty of campsites, and lodging on this route.Show more
#10 - Mount Snowdon Via Miner's Track
Snowdonia National Park
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Length: 8.1 mi • Est. 4 h 16 m
The Miners’ Track to Llyn Glaslyn starts from Pen y Pass car park. It starts off gradually until you get to Llyn Llydaw. This track was built during the last century to serve the Britannia Copper Mines, abandoned in 1917. The track to the lake is still almost a road, and though eroded in some places, nevertheless provides an exciting mountain walk for people with little experience of mountains. The route to the summit of Mount Snowdon beyond Llyn Glaslyn follows the Pyg Track. This is considerably steeper and can be a serious undertaking. The summit of Snowdon stands at 3560 ft. Please respect the mountain and keep to the paths for your safety, and also to protect the ecological balance.Show more
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