Explore the most popular scenic driving trails near Yellowstone National Park with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

Stunning and gorgeous trail. We drove and stopped off occasionally to see the geysers, hot springs, and even a herd of bison! The beauty of nature is very clear here, the best trail in Yellowstone.

nice drive and not busy.. the cone geyser was a first!

scenic driving
3 months ago

I honestly don't know how any drive in yellowstone is less than a 5

Stunning

scenic driving
3 months ago

beautiful drive

scenic driving
11 months ago

We drove to the Great Fountain Geyser on Firehole Lake Drive, which had just finished erupting and was spewing some steam and water about 20 feet as it finished its cycle. We spoke with a geyser expert, as she was knitting while timing the eruption and taking notes, one of several geyser watchers we saw on our journey. She had the Washington license plate “GEYSER." We also saw White Dome and Pink Dome Geysers along Firehole Lake Drive and drove through a seeping hydrothermal area surrounding Firehole Lake that looked pretty treacherous. The one-way drive came out at the Fountain Paint Pots of the Lower Geyser Basin. Don't miss this drive.

scenic driving
11 months ago

Very densely packed geothermal features in a single locality

scenic driving
Friday, July 28, 2017

Easy drive for some scenery, with a few cool stops.

scenic driving
Thursday, July 20, 2017

Nice side road to some different geysers.

Saturday, June 17, 2017

You need to take this trail. And try to hit it where you can see the fountain geyser go off. It's beautiful and we just happened to get there to see it. It's an easy drive with some neat pools/geysers.

scenic driving
Saturday, April 08, 2017

3 days earlier in late June, we had made it to West Thumb just ahead of a snowstorm, bagged our first bison spotting and made it out to the farthest point next to the lake in a scattered snow shower- quite surreal with the hot steamy pools and bubbling geysers. As we started to head back to the visitor bookshop, the snow started blowing horizontally with big flakes. We all rushed inside the little cabin, and the ranger fired up the woodstove. We warmed ourselves and checked out books and souvenirs as our inner temperatures re-adjusted. We then high-tailed it as a big tour bus was pulling up. We had just logged our first Yellowstone “experience.” For the return visit, after starting from Canyon Lodge, heading south, we stopped at LeHardys Rapids, just before Fishing Bridge, which is where the next caldera eruption will start, as it rests on a huge fault line. The river area was covered with newly hatched bugs - fly larva and great food for cutthroat trout. From there we stopped at Bridge Bay on Yellowstone Lake, skipped stones on the lake and saw folks fishing for cutthroats. We stopped again at West Thumb, now one of our favorite spots, for another look in the sunshine. On this second visit, we were really rewarded, as the pools were bright green, clear and sparkling and we again were the only ones on the boardwalk. Yellowstone is a great first NP trip for kids, wildlife is abundant and there is never a dull moment. Fishing Bridge to West Thumb is a must-do section of the Grand Loop.

scenic driving
Saturday, April 08, 2017

Driving through snow from Roosevelt in late June, we drove south toward Mt. Washburn, stopping at Tower Falls (a storm had washed away part of the trail to the foot of the falls), and the view from the upper viewing area was nice but partially blocked by trees. We drove on to Chittenden Road just after ascending the switch back of Mae West curve, found out the road was closed (maybe due to bears, or road needing repair), and drove on to stop at the Dunraven Pass elevation 8895 to hike Mt. Washburn (3 mi. RT) in the misty light snow. We journeyed forth along the old stagecoach trail up the mountain, met some hikers on the way down who said visibility was nil on top and cold and windy. We ventured further, saw a pheasant, got growled at by a grizzly and finally decided to turn around as the wind was blowing the snow horizontally. We had probably gone about 1 mile up. From Washburn, we drove back down to Canyon, made a stop at Calcite Springs Overlook and a sensational view of the Narrows. Then we went back along both rims of the Canyon of the Yellowstone, one of the highlights of the trip. On the 2 mile one-way north rim drive we stopped at Inspiration Point, Grandview Point, Lookout Point and took the great trail down to Red Rock Point (highly recommended!) getting us closest to the lower falls on the north rim, the Brink of the Lower Falls trail was closed for repair, then went on the Brink of the Upper Falls trail (the river is extremely powerful and wild diving over the upper cliffs), onto the South Rim road, taking the trails to Artist Point (beautiful palette of reds, whites and yellows in the sunlight, one of most famous views in park) and Uncle Tom’s trail to the lower falls (we took this trail down 328 steps and back up). The view was great at the bottom. The lower falls is 308 feet high; the upper is 109 feet high. We saw a small group of bison munching in the field near the Clear Lake Trail. We stopped at the Wapiti Trailhead for our standard PB&J trail lunch. It was about 4PM and we went back to Chittenden Road to find it had not opened, so went back to go it alone up the trail from Dunraven, knowing Mr. Bear was up the path. I took the walkie-talkie and kept in range for about one-fourth of a mile, but it soon became only a good way to let the bears know I was coming using the call button. I got about a half-mile further than we did the first time, could see the top, but the snow was picking up again, the trail was getting narrower, closed-in and the light was fading, so I decided to turn around once more. I had seen much of the trail, except for the steep switchbacks at the top, so felt somewhat satisfied with the venture. We headed back to Norris and on up to Mammoth, saw a herd of elk, and drove into Mammoth and ate burgers at the Terrace Grille. We next headed back to Canyon and ran into a herd of seven bison coming up the road (they owned the road), and we politely got over in the other lane to oblige. Quite a day's adventure, will get to the top of Mt. Washburn next time! The Canyon area is a great place to stay.

Honestly gets boring after 15 minutes.

scenic driving
Sunday, July 24, 2016

hiking
Thursday, March 03, 2016

Very cool waterfall right next to the road very cool !!!

scenic driving
Friday, February 19, 2016

This 19 mile section of road contains the highest consistent elevation of any of the main (figure 8) roads in the Yellowstone Park loop. Personally, I've seen more bear activity in this stretch of road than any other place in my multiple trips to the park. Be on the lookout for a lot of hiker activity and slowing traffic near the Mount Washburn trailhead. Mount Washburn is the highest point in the park and the Mt. Washburn trail is widely considered the most hiked trail in the park. Give it a shot if you have the time; the views from the summit are incredible.

scenic driving
Friday, February 19, 2016

Can I rate this with 6 stars?! There may not be a more intriguing 16 mile piece of road in the world. The amount of geothermal activity in this 16 mile stretch is absolutely unparalleled. Yes, there can be massive crowds (July and August especially), but when you see it for yourself, you can understand why. Avoid the crowds by visiting earlier in the year (May), or later. (September is by far the best month to visit Yellowstone in my opinion. Crowds are diminished and the elk are in rut.) If you're visiting during peak Summer times, get there really early in the morning to avoid the large crowds.

scenic driving
Friday, February 19, 2016

This stretch of road contains Gibbon Falls, Artist Paint Pots (one of my wife's favorites), and Beryl Springs.

scenic driving
Friday, February 19, 2016

I give this a 5-star rating simply because this route offers a great East/West shortcut through the middle of the park. Because there are no spectacular geothermal or natural wonders on this route, traffic is generally moving close to the 45mph posted speed even in the July & August peak times. (Unless, of course, there is wildlife near the road - then it's like everywhere else in the park - a standstill).

scenic driving
Friday, July 24, 2015

We drove along the Madison River to Old Faithful. It was beautiful and full of bubbling geysers that you could see along the way. Make sure to stop at Old Faithful and hike along the path. It goes for miles and there are plenty of incredible geysers along the way! Our favorite was Castle Geyser.

scenic driving
Wednesday, February 04, 2015

Beautiful drive. Unique and lots of wildlife.

scenic driving
Wednesday, February 04, 2015

Nice drive, but nothing particularly special compared to the rest of the wonders of the park.

scenic driving
Wednesday, February 04, 2015

This drive promises to be one of the most unique you'll ever encounter. The amount of thermal wonders along this drive is unparalleled in the world. Stop along the many short hikes to check out these wonders.

scenic driving
Monday, July 28, 2014

Pretty drive. Great mountain views. High elevation at certain points.

scenic driving
Monday, July 28, 2014

Pretty drive, very busy with lots of cars headed towards Old Faithful.

scenic driving
Monday, July 28, 2014

Very pretty drive from the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone over to the Norris Geyser Basin. Good way to get from one side of the park to the other.

scenic driving
Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Not as crowded as the road towards Old Faithful, but it has some pretty spots to stop like Gibbon Falls, and Beryl Springs.

scenic driving
Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Pretty drive along Yellowstone Lake.

scenic driving
Sunday, November 10, 2013

The Mt Washburn pass is the best part of this drive

scenic driving
Sunday, November 10, 2013

Make sure to take the Firehole River road and go for a swim in the river

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