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Best trails in Washington

314,449 Reviews
Trying to find the best Washington trails? AllTrails has 3,123 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Whether you're looking for the best trails in Mount Rainier National Park or around Issaquah, North Bend or Port Angeles we've got you covered. If you're looking for great Washington state park trails, check out Wallace Falls State Park . Or for some great local park options, check out Charles L Pack Experimental Forest or Discovery Park near Seattle. Ready for some activity? There are 1,183 moderate trails in Washington ranging from 0.6 to 4716.2 miles and from 3 to 10,718 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Washington
Top trails (3123)
#1 - Lake 22 Trail
Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(3307)
Length: 6.5 mi • Est. 2 h 22 m
Lake Twentytwo Trail is a beautiful hike to an alpine lake through old growth forests ending with stunning mountain views of Mount Pilchuck. The trail can be accessed off of Mountain Loop Highway in the North Cascades area of Washington State. The path starts out gently enough on a dirt staircase through rainforest. You will hear water trickling from twentytwo creek through the forest in several locations along the way. A bridge crosses the creek around a mile in where there is a particularly pretty waterfall. Here the trail gets steeper, with more rocks and some creek crossings. Gentle but persistent switchbacks lead to a long talus slope with the wall of Lake Twentytwo looming above, seemingly insurmountable. The talus is a jumble of sharp rock, but navigable. The trail switches back and heads toward the large stream which outlets from the lake where it finally flattens out. A bit further down the trail is you will encounter lake itself, a turquoise lake with an the enormous steep wall of Mount Pilchuck behind it. A path goes around the entire lake and it is worth the time it takes to do this extra loop trail. The trail is rocky, so sturdy hiking shoes or boots are necessary. Since there are creek crossings, waterproof hiking boots are recommended. This is a great hike, however it is very popular and can be crowded on weekends. It is best to get there early as parking fills up quickly.Show more
#2 - Snow Lake Trail
Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(2967)
Length: 6.4 mi • Est. 3 h 42 m
Note: When snow is present, be cautious of avalanche danger. Please check with the park page before hiking. A beautiful hike past numerous waterfalls, with an ending at a gorgeous alpine lake. The first 2 miles are direct, and the final has rock blasted switchbacks to the top of the ridge. Pay attention to signs as you need to branch right off the trail about 2 miles in. You can extend or shorten the hike by stopping right when you get to the lake or by hiking further along it. In winter, you can snowshoe here, but it will be much more difficult to find the trail. Show more
#3 - Skyline Trail
Mount Rainier National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1916)
Length: 6 mi • Est. 3 h 24 m
Note: This route is rated moderate-hard. Spikes and poles highly recommended in snow conditions. Trail loops around broad Edith Creek basin, leading through alpine flower meadows, past thundering waterfalls, and over high, craggy peaks. In this one loop you'll experience the best paradise region has to offer. Users recommend going clockwise.Show more
#4 - Wallace Falls Trail
Wallace Falls State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(2701)
Length: 5.9 mi • Est. 3 h 19 m
Wallace Falls is set of nine different cataracts in all which are well worth the hike up. The hike is short enough for a day time picnic outing. Be prepared to get a little exercise as it is a 1200 foot elevation gain up to the falls. On the trail, you'll find many examples of Cascade regional flora and fauna as well as some old growth forest. The trailhead is easy to find with public bathrooms and drinking water available. The path is well marked with bridges and nicely railed vista platforms to view the falls. There is also a covered picnic area when you reach the bottom falls. It is recommended to only take kids that are over 4 years old or very athletic. A lot of people stop at the picnic area to turn around and go back. However, if you hike the next mile, you'll get to see all of the upper falls which are quite beautiful. This trail is very popular and you will encounter others along the way. Discovery Pass is available to purchase at the visitor booth at the entrance to the trail ($30 for the year or $10 for a day). This is required.Show more
#5 - Colchuck Lake via Stuart Lake Trail
Alpine Lakes Wilderness
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(2106)
Length: 9 mi • Est. 4 h 39 m
Note: The road leading to the trailhead may be closed during the winter and will add 8 miles to your overall trip. There is a $5 cash for park fee unless you have the NW Forest Pass. You pay at the trail head. Please note that it's a heavily ticketed and towed area so be sure to park properly. There is a NO PARKING restriction for the entirety of Road 7601, from the start at Icicle Road 7600 to its terminus at Stuart Lake Trailhead. Parking is only allowed in the Eightmile and Stuart/Colchuck Trailhead Parking Lots. This is a challenging hike with beautiful scenery in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area of Washington State. This alpine lake is accompanied by the twin spires of Dragontail Peak and Colchuck Peak at the far end of the lake. Colchuck Lake Trail starts at Stuart Lake trailhead off of Forest Service Road 7601, which can be accessed from Icicle Creek Road. The parking area can be busy, as visitors access the Enchantments and Stuart Lake from this trailhead. A northwest forest pass is required. The hike starts out with an easy mile and a half, creek side walk through the forest. At some points along this portion of the hike you will catch a glimpse of Mountaineer Creek. After the walk through the woods, you will cross the creek on a bridge before beginning the first real incline of the hike. After a series of rocky switch backs you will reach the trail junction for Stuart, and Colchuck lakes. Stay to the left and you will happen upon another log bridge, stunning vistas that act as the gateway to the wilderness. You will stay to the right after crossing the bridge, and walk along the creek before your next big push uphill. The climb remains pretty consistent rocky, and with tree roots but manageable. You will have a few areas with views perfect for photo opportunities on your way to the lake. Once you reach Colchuck lake, you will be rewarded with beautiful views of the blue/green lake with the peaks towering behind it. The trail continues past Colchuck Luck up Aasgard Pass to the Enchantment Lakes if you choose to extend your hike. If not, return the way you came.Show more
#6 - Mount Si Trail
Mount Si Natural Resources Conservation Area
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(3534)
Length: 7.9 mi • Est. 5 h 12 m
The hike starts at the parking lot and the trail head is clearly marked, in a couple hundred yards you will begin your ascent to the top of Mount Si. The trail is well-maintained and dog-friendly, but be aware that there have been reports of bear spottings on the trail (although not very often). Most of the hike is under the shade of the trees which makes it a good hike even in the heat of summer. The trail ends on a rocky surface known as the Haystack, which can be very slippery when wet. You'll need some climbing experience if you plan to get to the top of the haystack. Discover Pass required.Show more
#7 - Lake Serene Trail and Bridal Veil Falls
Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(2459)
Length: 8.2 mi • Est. 5 h 17 m
Note: As of May 2020, the parking lot has reopened but the restrooms are still closed. There is a 15$ fee for parking if you don't have a pass. Lake Serene is an alpine lake nestled in the Cascade mountains of Washington State. Lake Serene Trail is a popular hike within the Mount Baker Snoqualamie Forest. The trailhead can be accessed off of Mount Index Road near Stevens Pass. Make sure to get an early start in order to get a parking spot at the trailhead. What the trail lacks in length, it makes up for in elevation gain. The first mile and a half winds across a well manicured and slightly inclined path, at the end of which you can choose to go another mile on Bridal Veil Falls Trail to Bridal Veil Falls or another two miles to the main trail to Lake Serene. The extra mile is certainly worth the side trip to see the falls. One you have returned to Serene Lake Trail, the two miles to the lake traverse a large climb, through a series of long, wooden steps, rocky passages, and switchbacks. Approximately 1.4 miles into the lake trail, you will encounter a very steep grade. Once you reach the lake, you will be rewarded by the stunning blue lake is that is clear, cool, inviting, and surrounded by high ridges and remnants of the previous winter snowfall. Find a spot along this gorgeous lake to eat lunch and take a rest. From the lake, you can also cross a log bridge and take a short trail that will take you to a large, smooth rock named "Lunch Rock", where you will find people relaxing and jumping into the lake. When you are ready, return via the way you came. This is a great hike and a must see destination that will greatly satisfy your sense of adventure and search of natural beauty. A Northwest Forest Pass is required.Show more
#8 - Twin Falls Trail
Olallie State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(2790)
Length: 3.6 mi • Est. 2 h 6 m
Lovely hike up to the waterfall that follows the river. The trail can be muddy and wet. Discovery Pass required. Parking is a bit tricky. The lot at the trailhead is limited and requires a parking fee, and many people were parking far up the road and walking to the trailhead because of a lack of spaces. We arrived after lunch, so getting there early might help. The kiosk to pay the fee will take a card. Show more
#9 - Tolmie Peak Trail
Mount Rainier National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1383)
Length: 6.4 mi • Est. 3 h 36 m
NOTE: The road leading to the trailhead closes seasonally due to snow. If the road is closed, it is a 5 mile walk to the trailhead. Tolmie Peak Trail is a beautiful hike past alpine lakes and subalpine meadows to a fire tower lookout with great views of the surrounding peaks and a commanding view of Mount Ranier. The two-story structure houses a lookout station on the upper level and storage at ground level. With an elevation gain of 1000 feet, this lake trail takes hikers up to Eunice Lake, Ipsut Pass - part of the Wonderland Trail, and up to Tolmie Peak Lookout. The trailhead is located on the north side of Mowich lake in historic Mount Rainier National Park just southeast of Seattle and Tacoma in Washington state. An active volcano, Mount Rainier is the most glaciated peak in the contiguous United States, spawning six major rivers. A National Park Pass is required to access hiking trails in the park. NOTE: Check current trail conditions before heading out. Log footbridges frequently wash out during the winter and other conditions could be affecting the trail. The road to the trailhead closes during the winter.Show more
#10 - Little Si Trail
Mount Si Natural Resources Conservation Area
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(2960)
Length: 4.5 mi • Est. 1 h 48 m
NOTE: You must purchase a State Discover Pass prior to parking in one of the two lots. You can buy one at the North Bend Ace Hardware or online and print it. Little Si is the little sister to Mount Si. The trail is easier with less elevation, but the view from the top is just as breathtaking with views of Snoqualmie Valley and Rattlesnake Mountain. The trail is often covered in snow and difficult to trek through much of the year. Dogs are allowed off leash, but it is best to keep your dog on the leash because of the heavy traffic on this trail. Show more
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