Best trails in Virginia

131,971 Reviews
Trying to find the best Virginia trails? AllTrails has 1,624 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Whether you're looking for the best trails in Shenandoah National Park or around Syria, Virginia Beach or Sperryville we've got you covered. If you're looking for great Virginia state park trails, check out Grayson Highlands State Park. Or for some great local park options, check out Turkey Run Park near Mc Lean or Lake Accotink Park. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 778 easy trails in Virginia ranging from 0.6 to 95.4 miles and from 0 to 5,091 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Virginia
Top trails (1624)
#1 - Old Rag Mountain Loop
Shenandoah National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(3741)
Length: 10.2 mi • Est. 5 h 5 m
Note: Entrance fees will be collected at the boundary trailheads, unless you have a current pass, and parking will be limited to available parking spots in designated parking areas only. Vehicles parked along the roadside will be ticketed and towed. This hike is one of the most popular hikes in Shenandoah National Park. It is a challenging hike, but when you make it about 3/4 of the way up, you will then have some rock scrambling that makes your pace a little slower. There are alot of switchbacks, so you will not be going straight up, but the trails are still at a steep grade. The descent, which is a longer distance than the ascent, is a much more gradual grade, ending on a fire trail. This hike begins with a one-mile walk up the road to the original Old Rag parking area (port-a-pots here.) Turn left onto the Ridge Trail and begin your approximate two mile ascent with switchbacks before reaching the boulder scramble section. There are handwritten numbers below the blue trail blazes throughout the trail. You’ll be going up, down, in between, around, and underneath granite boulders throughout the scramble. While going through the boulder scramble, keep your eyes open for the blue blazes, as sometimes they are in the strangest places. If you have a fear of heights, or jumping across crevasses, this will challenge you and encourage you to overcome your fears. When hiking Old Rag Mountain, each time you think you’ve reached the summit – you haven’t! This mountain has several false summits. You’ll know that you’ve reached the Old Rag Summit when you see the Old Rag Mountain brown elevation sign. Find a lovely rock with a fabulous 360 degree view for your lunch spot here, before starting your descent on the back of the mountain by way of the Saddle Trail. Rock hopping down, you’ll pass two shelters. First the Byrds Nest Shelter, then the Old Rag Shelter (privy here) before hitting a cross-roads. Stay to your right to continue back on the Weakley Hollow Fire Road for about four miles to return to the parking lot. This section can seem like it’ll last forever. You will pass through beautiful forests and see Brokenback Run that leads into the Hughes River.Show more
#2 - McAfee Knob via Appalachian Trail
Catawba, Virginia
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1951)
Length: 8.1 mi • Est. 4 h 16 m
This is a slow and steady climb to the most photographed spot on the Appalachian Trail. Base elevation is the elevation given at the parking area, 2,000'. The peak at McAfee Knob is 3,171', giving it some of the best views in the state. Please leave no trace and be mindful of trash! This trail sees a large number of traffic and has been having problems with rising trash, illegal camping and misuse of the area. The Roanoke Appalachian Trail Club maintains this section of trail and volunteers regularly pack out trash and maintain campsites to keep it beautiful. Park rules and regulations are enforced: -Maximum group size, day hikes: 25 -Maximum group size, backpacking/camping: 10 -No alcohol -Dogs must be kept on leash at all times -No camping or campfires outside of 7 designated areas (north of VA 624/Newport Rd, the only legal campsites are Johns Spring Shelter, Catawba Shelter and campsites, Pig Farm campsite, Campbell Shelter and Lambert’s Meadow Shelter and campsites) -No camping or campfires on McAfee Knob or Tinker CliffsShow more
#3 - White Oak Canyon and Cedar Run Trails Loop
Shenandoah National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(987)
Length: 9 mi • Est. 5 h 14 m
The 1st section of the trail takes you to the right along about 30 big and small waterfalls! This is the strenuous section of the trip. There is a great rock wall for climbers on this section approximately 1-1.5 miles from the trailhead (road 643) parking lot (weakly hollow road) which also makes a great place for lunch. The yellow trail, marked by yellow markers, is the 2nd part of the loop, you will go over a steel bridge crossing the river where there is a fork. The yellow trail is to the LEFT, and the blue trail on the right goes 3 miles to skyline drive (which is not part of this loop). The yellow trail is a horse trail, but still climbs to approximately ~3200 feet gradually. There are no stair steps here, and you still may need to stop and catch your breath. You will encounter the next intersection which you should follow to the left (still yellow blazes). This leg of the loop ends at the skyline drive parking lot which can be your other entry point for this trail. At this intersection (4 way) you will take the blue blazed trail which returns in the direction that you came. The 3rd and final part of the trail is blue marked and starts from the skyline drive parking lot intersection. This leg has a very notable waterfall called "the slide" because it is a sheer gradually sloped face with lots of waterflow over it, kind of like a slide. Having reached the peak of the hike in the 2nd leg end, this leg of the hike is downhill all the way. BEWARE that there are 3 river crossings, and this can be dangerous because they are on logs if you don't want to get wet. You can safely scoot along on the logs and make all the crossing. The final crossing will have red blazes on the trees marking all the crossing (approximately 4 log crossings). Be careful as the rocks may be slippery and can result in serious injury. This hike can be considered more strenuous than old rag mountain which is right next door. If you are taking tons of pictures of the falls, swimming, or taking an extra long lunch, then you should plan on 6-7 hours for this hike. The trail has groups come through heading to big meadows and can be busy at times, so start early. Larger wildlife may be present, especially on days with fog.Show more
#4 - Dark Hollow Falls Trail
Shenandoah National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1364)
Length: 1.4 mi • Est. 57 m
Dark Hollow Falls is one of the closest scenic falls to the Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park. This is a fairly easy walk down, but the trek back up on the way out may be slightly challenging. A very popular hike at mile 50.7. There are some sitting rocks along the trail if you need to rest especially on your way back up. In the spring the blossoms of Mountain Laurel adorn the path with bright pink blossoms. The trail follows the Hogcamp Branch stream as it leaves the Big Meadows spring and eventually drops over the falls. The trail is cool and shaded by a canopy of trees that offers welcome relief in the summer. As you are hiking down listen to the sounds of the water and also to the sounds of nature. One of the birds that may serenade your hike is the Blue Headed Vireo. This neotropical migrant that breeds at high elevations in the park has a very sweet melodious voice that seems to say "Look-Up, In-the-Trees". If you happen to see a dragonfly it may be one of the uncommon species that requires pristine, shaded mountain streams. When you spot one of these you know you are in a special place. Near the bottom of the trail you will come to a viewing platform where you can see the top of the falls. If you continue another tenth of a mile down the trail you will reach the base of the falls for a much more impressive view. Legend says that Thomas Jefferson was quite fond of these falls and spent time quietly contemplating the wonders of nature at the foot of Dark Hollow falls. Learn about black bears, wildflowers, and enjoy the falls as President Thomas Jefferson did back in the day.Show more
#5 - Hawksbill Gap Loop via Appalachian Trail
Shenandoah National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(934)
Length: 2.6 mi • Est. 1 h 33 m
This is a short and steep hike with outstanding views at the top. Parking can be a challenge, so it is advisable to get there early.Show more
#6 - Rose River Trail
Shenandoah National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1019)
Length: 3.5 mi • Est. 1 h 59 m
#7 - Raven Rocks via Appalachian Trail
Bluemont, Virginia
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1779)
Length: 4.8 mi • Est. 2 h 57 m
This is a moderate trail with the final view point being the most magnificent. This out-and-back hike -- which some locals call "the roller-coaster" -- winds up and down several ridges, some of which are fairly steep. When leaves have fallen, the valley peeks through in the distance. Terrain is similar to other sections of the AT in the area. There are some rocky sections. Please note that parking is scarce.Show more
#8 - Stony Man via Appalachian Trail
Shenandoah National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(974)
Length: 1.5 mi • Est. 49 m
#9 - Crabtree Falls Trail
George Washington and Jefferson National Forests
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(853)
Length: 2.8 mi • Est. 1 h 51 m
Note: Upcoming road maintenance projects will result in temporary road closures along short sections of the parkway. Please check the park page (https://www.nps.gov/blri/planyourvisit/crabtree-falls-trail.htm) for up to date trail accessibility before visiting. The lower portion of this trail is WHEELCHAIR accessible when it isn't too wet. Parking fee $3. The trailhead is located off a marked parking lot 6 miles down State Road 56 off the Blue Ridge Parkway near milepost 27. The parking lot has a small daily fee required to park. The hike is approximately 1.5 miles up, touching 5 unique overlooks of the falls. Most of the trail is not paved, although a small section to the 1st overlook is. The earlier overlooks are easier to access, with stairs and handrails, but getting to the top is moderately difficult. At the top, you can begin the descent back down to the parking lot or continue another 1.5 miles to Crabtree Meadows.Show more
#10 - South River Falls Trail and South River Fire Road Loop
Shenandoah National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(860)
Length: 4.6 mi • Est. 2 h 43 m
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