Best bird watching trails in Virginia

65,165 Reviews
Explore the most popular bird watching trails in Virginia with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of bird watching trails in Virginia
Top trails (728)
#1 - Crabtree Falls Trail
George Washington and Jefferson National Forests
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(904)
Length: 2.8 mi • Est. 1 h 51 m
Note: Parking fee $3. The lower portion of this trail is WHEELCHAIR accessible when it isn't too wet.Show more
#2 - Stony Man via Appalachian Trail
Shenandoah National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1015)
Length: 1.5 mi • Est. 49 m
#3 - Dragon's Tooth Trail
Jefferson National Forest
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(1031)
Length: 4.1 mi • Est. 2 h 29 m
The Roanoke Appalachian Trail Club maintains this section of trail and volunteers regularly pack out trash and maintain campsites to keep it beautiful. Please be mindful. Park rules and regulations are enforced: -Maximum group size, day hikes: 25 -Maximum group size, backpacking/camping: 10 -No alcohol -Dogs must be kept on leash at all times -No camping or campfires outside of 7 designated areas (north of VA 624/Newport Rd, the only legal campsites are Johns Spring Shelter, Catawba Shelter and campsites, Pig Farm campsite, Campbell Shelter and Lambert’s Meadow Shelter and campsites) -No camping or campfires on McAfee Knob or Tinker CliffsShow more
#4 - Bearfence Mountain Trail
Shenandoah National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(937)
Length: 1.0 mi • Est. 34 m
After parking in the Bearfence Mountain parking lot, cross Skyline Drive and follow the blue blazes of the Bearfence Trail. The Bearfence Trail leads up a steep slope that eventually turns into a scramble climb to the summit of Bearfence Mountain. Blazes mark the best scramble climbing route. The view from the summit is well worth the climb as it is one of only three summits in the park that has a 360-degree view. Getting down from the summit requires a short scramble climb, after which the Bearfence Trail returns to a normal hiking surface. The Appalachian trail can be accessed from either one of two right turns from the Bearfence Trail. The second right turn should be followed to complete the one-mile loop. The Appalachian Trail leads back down the mountain to Skyline Drive. The scramble climb makes this trail a unique hike to a great view. Anyone who is reasonably fit and flexible should be able to handle the scramble climb, but hikers who have issues with heights may want to skip this trail. Near the summit, the climbing path occasionally passes within eighteen inches or so of sheer drops. This is also definitely not the trail for families with kids small enough that they have to be carried, and older children may also find the climb difficult.Show more
#5 - Little Stony Man Loop via Appalachian Trail
Shenandoah National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(585)
Length: 3.4 mi • Est. 1 h 57 m
#6 - Sharp Top Trail
Blue Ridge Parkway
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(867)
Length: 2.6 mi • Est. 1 h 53 m
#7 - Marys Rock via Appalachian Trail (North Approach)
Shenandoah National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(866)
Length: 3.4 mi • Est. 2 h 11 m
#8 - Hawksbill Summit Trail
Shenandoah National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(546)
Length: 1.5 mi • Est. 1 h 4 m
Tallest peak in Shenandoah, nothing to see until summit, then 360 degree view. This trail is steep for nearly the entire hike. You are well inside the tree line for the entire hike, so there is not much to see. Once you reach the byrd shelter the views abound, and just another 100 feet or so, you reach the summit overlook, a beautiful 360 degree view. The NPS has a stone overlook built on the summit, so it's easy to know when you have gotten there. It's a tough walk but worth it. Within an hour you can bag the tallest peak in Shenandoah! There is an alternate version of this hike that is a loop. The hike described in this report is an out an back route.Show more
#9 - Wilburn Ridge via Appalachian Trail
Grayson Highlands State Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(541)
Length: 4.0 mi • Est. 2 h 11 m
Day use parking is along the road at Massie Gap with overflow at the Visitor Center. Overnight parking is now limited to the Overnight Backpackers Lot and reservations are required. Backcountry camping is not allowed within the state park boundaries, so you must hike onto USFS property before setting up. Check the park’s webpage for the most up to date information on reservations, trail closures, fees or requirements at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/grayson-highlands.Show more
#10 - Riprap Trail
Shenandoah National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(456)
Length: 9.1 mi • Est. 4 h 40 m
Please note: downloading the offline map is recommended to get oriented as several users have reported that this trail is not well marked and/or that there may be poor cell reception in this area. Follow the map closely as the signage is terrible and you may find yourself nearly exiting the park. On this route, there is a good variety of climbing up mountains and observing the valley views, rock formations, plants, and persistent woodpeckers and then going back down and crossing crystal-clear streams and small waterfalls with beautiful white and pink stones and the occasional trout. Shenandoah National Park charges a fee to enter. Fees are $30 per vehicle or $25 per motorcycle. If you are entering on foot, horse, or bike the fee is $15 per person. You can also purchase a park-specific annual pass for $55. Show more
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