Best trails in Utah

341,481 Reviews
Trying to find the best Utah trails? AllTrails has 2,817 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Whether you're looking for the best trails in Zion National Park or around Moab, Salt Lake City or Park City we've got you covered. If you're looking for great Utah state park trails, check out Dead Horse Point State Park. Or for some great local park options, check out Red Butte Canyon Research Natural Area near Salt Lake City or Memory Grove Park. Ready for some activity? There are 1,420 moderate trails in Utah ranging from 0.6 to 149.6 miles and from 2,493 to 13,464 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Utah
Top trails (2817)
#1 - Angels Landing Trail
Zion National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(9643)
Length: 4.4 mi • Est. 2 h 47 m
The Angels Landing Trail is a strenuous route in Zion National Park with steep drop-offs and very narrow sections. The technical route and incredible views of Zion Canyon make this hike the most popular in Zion. Start by parking at The Grotto Trailhead or taking the West Rim Shuttle to The Grotto shuttle stop. Begin by crossing a bridge over the Virgin River. The first 2-miles of the West Rim Trail are a well-maintained paved trail. Most of the path is sunny, but Refrigerator Canyon offers shade and often a cool breeze. Eventually, you’ll come to Walter's Wiggles, a set of 21 switchbacks that take their name from Walter Ruesch, Zion National Park’s first superintendent. The last half-mile (0.8 km) follows a steep and narrow ridge from Scout Lookout to Angels Landing itself, a fantastic observation point 1500 feet above Zion Canyon. Anchored support chains are attached along some sections of the sheer cliff to assist your way up and down the carved steps. You are rewarded with an excellent view of the main canyon at the top. Avoid standing near the edge at all times and do not hike the trail when it is wet, storming, or high winds are present. If you are afraid of heights, this trail is not recommended. Give yourself plenty of time to hike this trail before dark if starting late in the day. Although this is a popular hike all year round, summer afternoons can get extremely hot so it is recommended to visit in the spring and fall. The parking lot here fills up quickly so be sure to arrive early. The road to the trail is also closed periodically to limit the number of visitors.Show more
#2 - Navajo Loop and Queen's Garden Trail
Bryce Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(4174)
Length: 3.5 mi • Est. 1 h 25 m
Portions of this loop close seasonally in winter due to weather and freezing overnight temperatures. Please check the park website for updated information before heading out https://www.nps.gov/brca/planyourvisit/conditions.htm This hike is considered by many to be the best way to see the hoodoos in Bryce Canyon. The views from Sunrise Point and Sunset Point on the rim area stunning, but you will experience an entirely different Bryce Canyon from the canyon floor while looking up at the hoodoos. You start by hiking down Wall Street, a narrow canyon with high rock walls on either side. Soon after, you will reach the flat canyon floor with the option to finish the Navajo Loop or continue on along the Queens Garden Trail to see more of the canyon. If you have time, hike on to Queens Garden where you will see some of the most spectacular formations in the park. After you final ascent up to the rim you will arrive at sunrise point with a final view of the canyon. Hoodoos go through several stages: First they start as plateaus and water erodes away the sides until they become fins. Once the things become fairly skinny, holes will erode in the middle of them, creating a window. Finally, after more erosion, the top of the windows will break away leaving a hoodoo in its place. In Bryce, most erosion occurs from "frost wedging". Rain seeps into cracks of the rocks, and when the temperature drops the water freezes and expands, which creates larger cracks in the rocks. Show more
#3 - Delicate Arch Trail
Arches National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(5091)
Length: 3.4 mi • Est. 1 h 21 m
Delicate Arch Trail is a short hike in Arches National Park to Utah's most recognizable natural arch. You will likely recognize the famous arch from the Utah license plates. The hike starts at the Delicate Arch Trailhead off at the Wolf Ranch turn-off in the Moab area of southern Utah . There is a large parking area right off of the main park road. From the parking area you will cross the bridge over salt wash. The hike to Delicate Arch is just over 1.5 miles each way, approximately a 3 mile hike round-trip. It is best hiked in spring and fall when the temperatures are cooler, or during the golden hours just after sunrise or and before sunset when the rocks seem to turn a magical color and the air temperature is bearable again. Take at least 1 quart (1 liter) of water per person! There is no shade. Open slickrock with some exposure to heights. The first half-mile is a wide, well-defined trail. Upon reaching the slickrock, follow the rock cairns. The trail climbs gradually and levels out toward the top of this rock face. Just before you get to Delicate Arch, the trail goes along a rock ledge for about 200 yards. A visit to this beautiful arch is a must do in Arches National Park. Parking is limited and can fill up quickly during peak tourism months so make sure to arrive at the trailhead early.Show more
#4 - Lake Blanche Trail
Twin Peaks Wilderness
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(5163)
Length: 6.9 mi • Est. 4 h 37 m
Though demanding, this incredible hike is one of the best in the Twin Peaks Wilderness Area and features a beautiful mountaintop lake, awesome views, and abundant wildlife. Plan to stop several times to catch your breath as this trip does not have any flat sections. The trail starts at the Mill B South Fork Trailhead off Big Cottonwood Canyon Road. You’ll begin by walking alongside the creek on Mill B South Trail for a short distance before turning onto Lake Blanche Trail. The trail enters the wilderness area here at this point. The demanding climb is worth every step as you’ll have great views of Sundial Peak several miles up the canyon and the Great Salt Lake Valley to the west. At the top lie three beautiful lakes - Lake Blanche, Lake Florence, and Lake Lillian. The views down into the canyon below are breathtaking. Just prior to arriving at the lakes, parts of Salt Lake City are also visible from the trail. Make sure to take plenty of water! Insect repellent is a good idea as mosquitos are plentiful. If you are planning this hike for later in the day, pack a flashlight (with fresh batteries) in case your journey takes longer than planned. Attempting to navigate the trail after dark would be a very dangerous endeavor. In the winter, Spikes and poles are highly recommended. No fires are permitted anywhere in the Lake Blanche (Mill B South) drainage. Because this trail lies within a protected watershed, dogs and swimming are not permitted in the area. The gate to the parking lot may close in the winter, making parking much more difficult and along the road. This trail accesses or travels through potential avalanche terrain. For more information and to read the daily avalanche forecast please visit: https://utahavalanchecenter.orgShow more
#5 - The Zion Narrows Riverside Walk
Zion National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(3521)
Length: 1.9 mi • Est. 45 m
SEASONAL CLOSURE: The Narrows may close during extreme weather conditions (flash flood warnings). Please check conditions before visiting: https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/conditions.htm Planning a trip to Zion to hike The Narrows should be on every outdoor enthusiast's bucket list. This route along the Riverside Walk Trail is a relatively easy and paved out and back located at the end of the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive. This route only includes the maintained trail. Those looking for a longer adventure can find the full Zion Narrows route that continues down the river past this trail's endpoint. There is water and a restroom at the trailhead. You’ll also have access to sandy areas near the end of the entrance to the Narrows where you can cool your feet in the refreshing waters. A trip through Utah’s most famous slot canyon is unlike any other typical day hike. You’ll be walking in between towering canyon walls alongside the beautiful Virgin River. The river’s water level does vary and those who choose to continue past the end of this route will find themselves waist deep in the water. For this reason, it is recommended that you bring a walking stick and dry bag. If you plan to hike in the river, it is also recommended that you bring neoprene socks, which can be rented at various shops in the area. The Narrows is one of the most visited areas of Zion National Park. Visitors looking to escape the crowd but still explore an incredible slot canyon should check out the nearby Orderville Canyon. It is less crowded, narrower, and darker than The Narrows. Zion National Park has a shuttle system that operates in a loop and brings guests between the visitor center and various stops along the way (Get off at Temple of Sinawava to visit The Narrows). Another popular option for getting to the trailhead is by renting an e-bike. For a map, please visit Zion National Park's website. Accessibility: There are 4 designated handicapped-accessible spaces in the paved parking lot off of Zion Canyon Scenic Drive at the south end of the trail. All of them are van-accessible with striped access aisles. The trail surface is cement, smooth, and typically at least 3 feet wide. The most accessible portion of the trail is the first 0.4 miles northbound. This section has its own trail page: https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/utah/zion-riverside-walk The estimated grade is mostly gentle except for very steep (over 12%) uphill sections past about 0.4 miles when going north. Wheelchair/mobility equipment or stroller users may need assistance in the steeper sections or to avoid them for safety. If navigating with mobility equipment, a wheelchair, or stroller, visit https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/accessibility.htm for additional information.Show more
#6 - Devils Garden Loop Trail with 7 Arches
Arches National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(3156)
Length: 7.8 mi • Est. 3 h 7 m
SEASONAL CLOSURE: This area is subject to seasonal closure due to weather conditions. For more information, please visit https://www.nps.gov/arch/planyourvisit/devils-garden.htm This is a wonderful hike that allows you to see up to six natural arches. The main trail is well maintained, and wide. The first spur trail takes you to Tunnel Arch and Pine Tree Arch. The trail leads to Landscape Arch, which at 306' long and is one of the largest natural spans in the world. After visiting Landscape Arch, you begin your only significant uphill climb of the trip. You will walk well below Wall Arch, then climb higher to spur trails to Navajo and Partition Arch. At this point retrace the main trail back to the trailhead or continue on for an additional 2 1/4 miles for views of Double Arch and Dark Angel.Show more
#7 - Zion Canyon Overlook Trail
Zion National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(2462)
Length: 0.9 mi • Est. 22 m
The Canyon Overlook Trail offers some of the most breathtaking views of Zion Canyon. Located in the Upper East Canyon portion of the park, the trail is actually one of the few official trails in the area. This unfortunately means that the shuttle does not stop at this trailhead. To do this hike, you must enter the park in a private vehicle. You’ll be able to see the overlook from the switchbacks on Route 9. After going through the tunnel, the trailhead parking area is on your right. Parking is extremely limited here, but there are overflow lots further down the road. The trailhead is a collection of stone steps that ascend the ridge directly across the road from the first parking area. The trail passes through shaded alcoves with ferns and trees, across a planked boardwalk and through a moist grotto, and over bare slick rock, wandering its way to the edge of an impressive cliff overlook. Although mostly flat and easy, there are sections with steep drop offs on one side. These sections have railings, but those with children should be careful. You can see the expanse of Zion Canyon from the overlook, with its monumental formations visible on either side. You can see the road as it switchbacks below the west end of the Mount Carmel Tunnel. The West Temple, Towers of the Virgins, Streaked Wall, and Beehives all make up part of this tremendous view. The East Temple rises directly above the overlook, towering more than 2,200 ft above the canyon floor. The Great Arch lies recessed into the cliff-face below the overlook.Show more
#8 - The Watchman Trail
Zion National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(3369)
Length: 3.1 mi • Est. 1 h 41 m
The Watchman Trail in Zion National Park is an easy and well-maintained trail that is often overlooked by hikers. Many others are going to the neighboring trails and often pass by this hike in Zion. It overlooks the entire Springdale area and is ideal for beginner hikers. Don’t have shuttle tickets? This trail is a great choice if you missed out on getting tickets beforehand. The Watchman trailhead parking lot is the closest classic hike to the south entrance of the park, only half a mile away. The trail starts as a steady incline up moderate switchbacks leading to great views of the area at the outlook plateau. The hike is mostly not shaded, but you are surrounded by green shrubbery and desert flora. The Watchman tower and Bridge Mountain are visible throughout the hike. If you are looking to get away from crowds, this may not be the day hike for you. Show more
#9 - Bells Canyon Trail to Lower Falls
Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(3605)
Length: 4.6 mi • Est. 2 h 50 m
Know Before You Go. This trail accesses or travels through potential avalanche terrain. For more information and to read the daily avalanche forecast please visit: https://utahavalanchecenter.org For a short hike, this is one tough workout, especially that last half mile. The views of the city and waterfall are great. Since this trail lies within a protected watershed, dogs and swimming are not permitted in the area.Show more
#10 - Fairyland Loop Trail
Bryce Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(2069)
Length: 7.8 mi • Est. 4 h 9 m
SEASONAL CLOSURE: The road leading to this trailhead closes seasonally. During winter months hikers can start this route at Sunrise Point instead. Fairyland Loop Trail begins at Fairyland Point, at the northern portion of the park, and takes you through spectacular hoodoos and scenery along the rim and into the canyon; including a spur trail to Tower Bridge. The Fairyland Loop Trail also includes a portion of the Rim Trail from Sunrise Point to Fairyland Point. This hike is considered hard due to its length and meandering trails with multiple elevation changes. It is best to carry plenty of water, 1 quart (liter) for every 2-3 hours of hiking per person, as this hike typically takes 4-5 hours round trip over the 8 mile (12.9 km) length. In the summer sun screen or large brim hats are recommended and are even a comfort year round to avoid sunburn.Show more
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