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Best trails in Hanksville

1,305 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Hanksville, Utah? AllTrails has 43 great hiking trails, mountain biking trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Capitol Reef National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Fiddler Butte Wilderness Study Area or Mount Ellen-Blue Hills Wilderness Study Area. Ready for some activity? There are 19 moderate trails in Hanksville ranging from 1.2 to 19.6 miles and from 4,078 to 11,525 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Hanksville
Top trails (43)
#1 - Little Wild Horse Bell Canyon Trail
Crack Canyon Wilderness
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(485)
Length: 8 mi • Est. 3 h 45 m
#2 - The Goblin's Lair (Chamber of the Basilisk)
Goblin Valley State Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(209)
Length: 2.4 mi • Est. 57 m
Hidden away on the parks eastern boundary, beyond the cliffs that form the far wall of the Valley of Goblins, is a massive cavernous formation known as The Goblins Lair. Not truly a cavern, the lair is actually a beautiful slot canyon, the entrance of which has been sealed by rock fall. Depending on time of day, light may pour in through ceiling vents more than 100 feet above the chamber floor. Once a secret gem known only to a few, a marked trail now guides visitors to the hikers entrance of the lair. The trail begins at the observation point, and follows the Carmel Canyon loop before splitting off after 1/2 mile. Some moderate scrambling up scree slopes and over boulders is required. Caution is advised. Permits for those wishing to rappel into the Goblins Lair are available at the visitor center desk. A $2 permit fee (per group) is charged for the maintenance of the route. For rappelling, access is from the west side. People climb up from the west, rappel down into the Chamber and exit and hike out from the east on the trail. Show more
#3 - Ding and Dang Canyons
Crack Canyon Wilderness
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(112)
Length: 8.3 mi • Est. 3 h 20 m
This route is rated as a class 4 hike or 2A II on the ACA canyoneering scale. It requires down climbing short drops of about 10-12 feet. Technical gear is not needed to complete this route and a rope and rappelling are not required. That being said, a rope may be helpful as a hand line for the average hiker. The Ding & Dang Canyon loop hike is located in the San Rafael Swell near Goblin Valley. Some guidebooks refer to the canyons as 1st and 2nd Canyon. The hike travels through two slot canyons and is a fun romp for experienced hikers. Amazing loop, on the edge of technical. Having a short rope and some rope skills would help any group. Would NOT recommend bringing dogs through ding canyon unless they are small enough to be carried the majority of the time.Show more
#4 - Valley of the Goblins
Goblin Valley State Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(91)
Length: 1 mi • Est. 27 m
Valley of the Goblin is an area open for exploration with no real trail system. Along the way, visitors see Goblin Valley from different perspectives. Show more
#5 - Horseshoe Canyon Trail
Canyonlands National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(60)
Length: 7 mi • Est. 3 h 45 m
#6 - Crack Canyon
Crack Canyon Wilderness
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(49)
Length: 5 mi • Est. 2 h 15 m
#7 - Three Sisters
Goblin Valley State Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(25)
Length: 1.1 mi • Est. 30 m
The Three Sisters is the most iconic of all goblin formations within the park, and is found on many of the souvenir items available in the visitor center. Most visitors snap a photograph of it as they drive toward the observation point. For those wishing for a closer look, an unmarked but easy-to-follow trail does exist. Simply pull off into one of the nearby parking spots along the road and start walking. In addition to the Three Sisters, the trail also grants views of the Carmel Canyon drainage system, 100 feet below.Show more
#8 - Leprechaun Canyon
Fiddler Butte Wilderness Study Area
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(37)
Length: 2 mi • Est. 49 m
Leprechaun Canyon is a complex of 3 technical slot canyons that requires technical gear and skills to descend. However, the lower portion of the canyon can be hiked from the bottom up to the confluence where, at this point the canyon narrows and traveling up becomes challenging. Please do not vandalize the canyon by leaving behind trash, graffiti, carvings in the sandstone, or rock cairns.Show more
#9 - The Great Gallery
Canyonlands National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(15)
Length: 10.6 mi • Est. 5 h 23 m
#10 - Cottonwood Wash
Capitol Reef National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(24)
Length: 6.4 mi • Est. 3 h 24 m
It’s almost like four different hikes in one. You have the flat open path, the paths up through the mountain, the rocky section, then finally the slot canyon. Some notably harder parts include climbing under a large rock, shimmying your way up a foot wide narrow, and boosting yourself up over a rock a few feet up. It is recommended to stop by the visitor’s center and get info for this trail from a ranger. The start is technically outside of the park and you hike into it if you get past the deep water. Park at the trailhead or off road the first mile and have fun strolling down the flat open pathway.Show more
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