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Best trails in Bryce

11,752 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Bryce, Utah? AllTrails has 34 great hiking trails, views trails, wildlife trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Bryce Canyon National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like White Cliffs or Paria-Hackberry Wilderness Study Area. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 15 easy trails in Bryce ranging from 0.6 to 11.1 miles and from 7,670 to 9,110 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Bryce
Top trails (34)
#1 - Navajo Loop and Queen's Garden Trail
Bryce Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(2596)
Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 10 m
Please note that portions of this loop may close due to weather and freezing overnight temperatures. Other trails in the areas can still be used to make a full loop. This hike is considered by many to be the best way to see the hoodoos in Bryce Canyon. The views from Sunrise Point and Sunset Point on the rim area stunning, but you will experience an entirely different Bryce Canyon from the canyon floor while looking up at the hoodoos. You start by hiking down Wall Street, a narrow canyon with high rock walls on either side. Soon after, you will reach the flat canyon floor with the option to finish the Navajo Loop or continue on along the Queens Garden Trail to see more of the canyon. If you have time, hike on to Queens Garden where you will see some of the most spectacular formations in the park. After you final ascent up to the rim you will arrive at sunrise point with a final view of the canyon. Hoodoos go through several stages: First they start as plateaus and water erodes away the sides until they become fins. Once the things become fairly skinny, holes will erode in the middle of them, creating a window. Finally, after more erosion, the top of the windows will break away leaving a hoodoo in its place. In Bryce, most erosion occurs from "frost wedging". Rain seeps into cracks of the rocks, and when the temperature drops the water freezes and expands, which creates larger cracks in the rocks. Show more
#2 - Fairyland Loop Trail
Bryce Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1454)
Length: 7.8 mi • Est. 4 h 9 m
Fairyland Loop Trail begins at Fairyland Point, at the northern portion of the park, and takes you through spectacular hoodoos and scenery along the rim and into the canyon; including a spur trail to Tower Bridge. The Fairyland Loop Trail also includes a portion of the Rim Trail from Sunrise Point to Fairyland Point. This hike is considered hard due to its length and meandering trails with multiple elevation changes. It is best to carry plenty of water, 1 quart (liter) for every 2-3 hours of hiking per person, as this hike typically takes 4-5 hours round trip over the 8 mile (12.9 km) length. In the summer sun screen or large brim hats are recommended and are even a comfort year round to avoid sunburn.Show more
#3 - Peekaboo Loop Trail
Bryce Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1064)
Length: 5.2 mi • Est. 3 h 5 m
Note: As of January 2020, weather conditions may close Bryce Point. Please check with the park before visiting. The Peek-A-Boo Loop Trail begins at Bryce Point and drops quickly to the canyon floor. While some consider this a more moderate hike, due to the rapid elevation change and the length this hike is considered hard. Hikers are cautioned to be aware that this trail is shared with horses.Show more
#4 - Navajo Loop Trail
Bryce Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(900)
Length: 1.5 mi • Est. 37 m
Please note that portions of this loop may close due to weather and freezing overnight temperatures. The Navajo Loop Trail drops down into the amphitheater and passes through "Wall Street," a narrow switchbacked slot between sheer cliffs, with towering Douglas fir trees growing along the trail. The trail provides outstanding views of much-photographed Thor's Hammer - a tall, narrow pinnacle with a narrower neck, supporting a large hammerhead-like rock. Looking west from the trail are grand views into the "Silent City" where rock structures resemble towers and buildings and temples. To the east, see the "Temple of Osiris." The Navajo Loop Trail extends 1.3 miles, starting and ending at Sunset Point, with an ascent/descent of 550 feet. Most people take 1-2 hours. For a longer hike, continue onto the Queen's Garden Loop or the Peakaboo Loop, each for approximately 3 miles. Both of those trails can also be combined to create a 6.3 mile figure 8 loop. There are portions of the trail that provide no shade and get quite hot especially in the summer months, but there are also stretches of the trail covered by the shade of rock formations that get very cold. Make sure to bring water and dress appropriately.Show more
#5 - Wall Street and Queens Garden Loop Trail
Bryce Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(707)
Length: 3.2 mi • Est. 1 h 17 m
Please note that portions of this loop may close due to weather and freezing overnight temperatures. Heavily trafficked combination trail loop weaving in and out of red rock formations through Bryce Canyon. Please note that the Wall Street portion of the trail is often closed throughout the year due to freezing overnight temperatures. Summer months are the best time to see Wall Street. This same route can be modified by cutting through the Navajo loop segment when Wall Street is closed.Show more
#6 - Sunset Point to Sunrise Point
Bryce Canyon National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(670)
Length: 1.1 mi • Est. 30 m
#7 - Queen Victoria via Queen's Garden Loop
Bryce Canyon National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(674)
Length: 2.1 mi • Est. 1 h 7 m
NOTE: Connection to Navajo loop is closed due to trail maintenance on the switchbacks. Hikers can still access the trail from Sunset point. Check with the NPS site before visiting for trail closures: https://www.nps.gov/brca/planyourvisit/queensgarden.htm Please note that portions of this loop may close due to weather and freezing overnight temperatures. Heavily trafficked combination trail weaving in and out of red rock formations through Bryce Canyon.Show more
#8 - Wall Street and Queens Garden Loop to Peekaboo Loop (Figure Eight Trail)
Bryce Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(411)
Length: 6.3 mi • Est. 3 h 33 m
#9 - Navajo Loop Trail to Peekaboo Loop
Bryce Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(563)
Length: 5 mi • Est. 2 h 1 m
#10 - Tower Bridge Trail
Bryce Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(447)
Length: 3.4 mi • Est. 1 h 56 m
Great hike with a lot of variation in the landscape. As it is part of the Fairyland Loop, you can always extend it to make a longer hike but at the end of the day, just going out to Tower Bridge and back was a great hike to end with. There are some really nice views of the hoodoos. The trail is also fairly wide and even, not too many rocks, but a little snowy/muddy at the end of winter. The white sandstone against the sapphire sky was incredible. And across from that was this sea of red sand and the China Wall. It felt like being on Mars. Tower Bridge, you can't actually get that close to, but you can see it pretty decently if you find a spot between the trees. This trail is not nearly as popular as the Navajo or Queens trails but worth venturing down for some variation.Show more
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