A grouping of several trails that can be scaled up to the full five miles or scaled back to as little as three miles. The centerpiece is the painted bunting trail (have not seen a painted bunting yet), which is 70% meadow to 30% forest. In Spring, the flowers are your main attraction and, if the trail has not been recently mowed, grasshoppers might bounce off of you as you forge ahead. In Winter, the attraction is the unrestrained wind carrying the intoxicating scent of distant fireplaces. You will hike several inclines, but none too high or too rough (just rough enough). You will have to hop-scotch over the rocks; most have been placed by nature at intervals that will favor your feet, but do keep your eyes on the ground as you navigate them. It is true the surroundings are not the most handsome; this is the grizzled Hill Country landscape, after all, and I believe some controlled burns were conducted in the past, giving the place a war-torn appearance in spots. On the other hand, the open view allows you to scan occasionally for feral hogs, whom you might see trotting about. A distant hello is sufficient for these creatures. If you are scaling up, you will detour off the painted bunting trail at the crossroads down inside what I call the 'valley of the souls' (you'll know it when you see it) onto the live oak and river overlook trails. On this detour the view narrows and the rocks get ornery. You can wander off-trail to gaze upon the Guadalupe and wonder who else has been there as the centuries have passed, but do not stop for long, lest you lose the hang of getting through the gauntlet of stone. You will eventually pick up the painted bunting trail again and be hit with the hike's rudest incline. Hit it with all your vigor and it tends to back down. Then you're in open country again (or at the parking lot). Congratulations, it is accomplished.