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Best trails in Gardiner

1,351 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Gardiner, Montana? AllTrails has 11 great hiking trails, views trails, wild flowers trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. You'll also find some great local park options, like Hyalite-Porcupine-Buffalo Horn Wilderness Study Area. Ready for some activity? There are 5 moderate trails in Gardiner ranging from 6 to 47.2 miles and from 5,360 to 9,937 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Gardiner
Top trails (11)
#1 - Mammoth Hot Springs Area Trail
Yellowstone National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(584)
Length: 3.5 mi • Est. 1 h 47 m
Mammoth Hot Springs is a large hot spring complex on a hillside of travertine terraces in Yellowstone National Park. Limestone is the dominant underlying rock in place of rhyolite, which dominates in the other large hydrothermal zones of the park. This region is one of the world's best examples of hot travertine deposits. It is also one of the most dynamic hydrothermal zones in the park: its characteristics are constantly changing. Inactive terraces underlie most of this area, including the hotel and the Albright Visitor Center. The maximum water temperature is 163 ° F / 73 ° C. For hundreds of years, residents of Shoshone and Bannock have collected minerals from the Mammoth hot spring for white paint. These minerals contribute to the beautiful structures of the terrace, as well as to the heat, a system of "plumbing" natural water and limestone. The volcanic heat source for the Mammoth Hot Springs remains a mystery. Scientists have proposed a number of sources, including the large magma chamber underlying the Yellowstone Caldera, or perhaps a smaller heat source closer to Mammoth. In Mammoth, a network of fractures and cracks forms the plumbing system that allows underground hot water to reach the surface. The water comes from the rain and snow that falls on the surrounding mountains and seeps deep into the earth where it is heated. Small earthquakes can keep the plumbing open. Limestone, deposited here millions of years ago when a vast sea covered this region, provides the final ingredient. Hot water with dissolved carbon dioxide prepares a weak carbonic acid solution. When the solution rises through the rock, it dissolves the calcium carbonate, the main compound of the limestone. On the surface, the calcium carbonate is deposited in the form of travertine, the rock that forms the terraces of the Mammoth Hot Springs. Primary Colors: Thermophiles (heat-loving micro-organisms) create tapestries of color where hot water circulates between terraces. Colorless and yellow thermophiles develop in the warmest waters; Thermophiles orange, brown and green grow in colder waters. The colors also change with the seasons. Living Sculpture: These terraces are like living sculptures, shaped by the volume of water, the slope of the ground and the objects on the way to the water. They change constantly and sometimes overnight, but the overall activity of the whole area and the volume of water discharges remain relatively constant. Here, like in other places on the planet, the rock is formed before your eyes. Lower Terraces: You can access these terraces from the sidewalks at their base or from Upper Terrace Drive. Some sections of the sidewalk are wheelchair accessible; the rest of the area has steep stairs or slopes due to the terrain. Upper Terrace Drive: The entrance to Upper Terrace Drive is 2 miles south of the Albright Visitors Center on the Grand Loop Road. This one-way scenic drive winds for 2.4 km through hot springs and travertine formations. Caravans, buses and motorhomes are prohibited on the driveway due to the limited number of parking spaces and a narrow, winding roadway. Park these vehicles on the lot near the Grand Loop road, then enjoy the upper terraces on foot. Please stay on the road and sidewalks.Show more
#2 - Red Rock Point via Red Point Trail
Yellowstone National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(270)
Length: 0.7 mi • Est. 18 m
Short walk that ends with a lower and upper lookout of a beautiful waterfall - a mix of paved trail with switchbacks and stairs. Due to the stairs on this trail, the park does not recommend its use for those with heart or respiratory conditions or using equipment such as wheelchairs or strollers.Show more
#3 - Beaver Ponds Loop Trail
Yellowstone National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(266)
Length: 6 mi • Est. 2 h 56 m
This is a popular loop hike with two trailheads in Mammoth Hot Springs. This is a great hike for those who want to see wildlife. One trailhead is near the Hymen Spring at Mammoth Hot Springs. The other trailhead is behind the Justice Center. The trail loops through an open area on the side of a mountain, were a great view of Gardner Canyon can be seen. The hike's climax is at the Beaver Ponds which are actually on the Montana side of the Park. There are two beaver dams there, and reports of many kinds of wildlife. Much of the trail is also on the edge of a forest. The trail goes up and down regularly, but the trail doesn't seem to be too steep at any point.Show more
#4 - Sheepeater Cliff Trail
Yellowstone National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(55)
Length: 0.9 mi • Est. 23 m
#5 - Hellroaring Creek Loop Trail
Yellowstone National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(14)
Length: 47.2 mi • Est. Multi-day
#6 - Black Canyon of the Yellowstone Trail
Custer Gallatin National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(11)
Length: 20.4 mi • Est. 10 h 20 m
#7 - Thompson Lake Trail
Custer Gallatin National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(5)
Length: 11.7 mi • Est. 5 h 56 m
#8 - Rescue Creek Trail to Turkey Pen Peak (Gardner Side)
Yellowstone National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(14)
Length: 6.7 mi • Est. 3 h 52 m
#9 - Osprey Falls, Bunsen Peak and Terrace Mountain
Yellowstone National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(5)
Length: 16.2 mi • Est. 9 h 5 m
A full day hike in northern YNP, ending in a visit to Mammoth hot springs. The Bunsen part can be shorted to 5.1 km instead of 6.6 km by using the lower service road, this also takes out most of the elevation (see Bunsen Peak Loop on Alltrails) The Terrace Mountain part can be enlongated to 6.3 km instead of 3.9 km by using the left side of the mountain, without losing any elevation (see Terrace Mountain Trail on Alltrails)Show more
#10 - Boiling River Trail [CLOSED]
Yellowstone National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(74)
Length: 1.2 mi • Est. 32 m
Note: As of July 2020, this trail is closed due to high water levels. Please check with the park page for more information. This is an easy there-and-back hike with a hot spring to soak in at the destination. The hot springs are closed to swimmers during spring flooding (undetermined date in May until undetermined date in July usually). Boiling River closes at 18:00 hours. Show more
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