Best camping trails in Mississippi

852 Reviews
Explore the most popular camping trails in Mississippi with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of camping trails in Mississippi
Top trails (16)
#1 - Richardson Creek Trail
Homochitto National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(137)
Length: 9.7 mi • Est. 3 h 53 m
20+ Miles of Mountain Biking/Hiking Trails. Located south of Meadville, MS in the Homochitto National Forest. The Trail system is a ride in ride out facility. The Clear Springs park has 22 full hook-up campsites & 22 primitive sites. Show more
#2 - Black Creek National Recreation Trail
Big Creek Landing Recreation Area
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarGray Star(59)
Length: 40.0 mi • Est. Multi-day
#3 - Dunns Falls Trail
Enterprise, Mississippi
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(40)
Length: 0.4 mi • Est. 11 m
Note: This trail is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. There is a $3.25 fee. A 65 foot waterfall the flows into the Chunky River. It was used as a power source for a gristmill. You can hike a short distance down to the bottom of the falls and swim in the river. Show more
#4 - Longleaf Trace Trail
Hattiesburg, Mississippi
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(106)
Length: 40.5 mi • Est. Multi-day
This southern charmer invites you to explore the enchanted forests of Mississippi w/ interpretive signs to lead the way. This is truly a multipurpose/multi-use trail. The trail is also wheelchair accessible throughout its entire length. This trail is not only the longest rail trail in Mississippi, but it is the longest in the south-central United States. It is a very smooth trail with beautifully forested stretches. In addition to the usual trail scenery and tranquility, this trail has some unique and interesting features from a large beaver dam to a year-round Christmas tree. This trail is probably one of the most family-friendly trails in the world. In addition to being fairly flat and smooth, it has frequent rest-stops with bathrooms, vending machines, refreshments, and covered seating. Another unique feature of the trail is the forestry educational signs. All along the way, you will find dozens of signs identifying various common southern species of trees and other flora. You will find such varieties as Loblolly Pine, Supplejack, White Oak, Crabapple, Southern Magnolia, Mimosa, Sassafras, and the trail's namesake Longleaf Pine. Other trail users exhibit that famous southern charm and gentility and trail-users are welcomed in the small towns along the way. The only large town along the trail is Hattiesburg, home to the University of Southern Mississippi on whose campus the trail begins. At this point, there is an information station and bike rental business called the Gateway at Southern Miss. The rental shop has friendly proprietors and an abundance of bikes including a nice selection of recumbents and some tandems. That works out nicely since this trail is ideal for riding recumbents and bicycles-built-for-two. If you've never ridden either, this is the ideal place to give them a try. Some of the businesses along the trail are quintessentially southern. You will feel like you are in an episode of Petticoat Junction as you browse the quaintly cluttered shelves and old-fashioned cash register in this last establishment. Accessibility: The parking lot (southeast end of the route) is part of the University of Southern Mississippi campus and there are multiple handicapped-accessible parking spots with access aisles there. The trail surface is smoothly paved asphalt and typically at least eight feet wide. The estimated grade is mostly gentle (all 5% or less) so the route will likely be traversable for most wheelchairs/mobility equipment or strollers.Show more
#5 - Noxubee Hills Outer Loop
Tombigbee National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(32)
Length: 26.8 mi • Est. 11 h 47 m
A user has reported the parking inside the camping area is closed, but if you travel a little further down the road and cross the levy, there is a parking lot there. Show more
#6 - Clear Springs Nature Trail
Sardis, Mississippi
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(32)
Length: 0.6 mi • Est. 17 m
A loop near scenic Sardis Lake leading over wooden boardwalk through a cypress/Tupelo gum bottomland swamp; diverse wildlife: bald eagles, terns, gulls, migrating pelicans, cormorants, ospreys, coots, diving ducks; optimum viewing of new offspring in May and June.Show more
#7 - Flint Creek Water Park Nature Trail
Flint Creek Water Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(20)
Length: 2.2 mi • Est. 57 m
#8 - Little Mountain Trail
Jeff Busby Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(36)
Length: 1.8 mi • Est. 44 m
#9 - Wall Doxey Trail
Wall Doxey State Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarGray Star(46)
Length: 1.9 mi • Est. 49 m
#10 - Black Creek Canoe Trail: Brooklyn to Fairley Bridge Road
De Soto National Forest
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(13)
Length: 28.4 mi • Est. 11 h 37 m
Showing results 1 - 10 of 16