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Best trails in Lovell

225 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Lovell, Maine? AllTrails has 5 great hiking trails, forest trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails around Crawford Notch State Park or Mount Washington State Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like White Mountain National Forest or Pleasant Mountain Preserve. Ready for some activity? There are 3 moderate trails in Lovell ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 miles and from 488 to 1,755 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Lovell
Top trails (5)
#1 - Speckled Mountain Loop
White Mountain National Forest
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(125)
Length: 9.4 mi • Est. 4 h 47 m
#2 - White Cairn Trail
White Mountain National Forest
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(46)
Length: 3 mi • Est. 2 h
#3 - Mountain, Orange, and Ron's Loop
Five Kezar Ponds Reserve
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(21)
Length: 2.5 mi • Est. 1 h 25 m
#4 - Red, Blue, Saddle and Gallie Loop
Heald Bradley Ponds Reserve
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(17)
Length: 4.5 mi • Est. 2 h 23 m
#5 - Kezar River Trail
Kezar River Tract (Mill Pond)
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(13)
Length: 1.6 mi • Est. 40 m
This 114 acre reserve is divided by Mill Pond where waterfowl are abundant and beaver and otters frequent the shores. The forest habitat support deer, moose, fox, black bear, owls, hawks, wood peckers, songbirds and a large variety of native species. The colorful “chicken of the woods” and other interesting mushrooms are common. A geological feature uncommon to the eastern U.S., known as “headwall erosion” is believed to have formed the five ravines. These deep v-shaped features occur when underground streams erode the banks and “roofs” slowly collapse, widening from the pond to further upstream. An area marked “quicksand” is a serious precaution as it is very fine, wet and deep sand.Show more