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Best trails in Cumberland Center

395 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Cumberland Center, Maine? AllTrails has 6 great hiking trails, walking trails, dogs leash trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails around Popham Beach State Park or Wolfes Neck Woods State Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Pleasant Mountain Preserve or Town of Harpswell. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 5 easy trails in Cumberland Center ranging from 1.3 to 4.8 miles and from 72 to 472 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Cumberland Center
Top trails (6)
#1 - Rines Forest Trail
Cumberland Center, Maine
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(131)
Length: 1.3 mi • Est. 36 m
The Rines Forest is a magnificent 216 acre woodland in the heart of Cumberland. This beautiful and tranquil natural environment has impressive autumn colors, cascading waterfalls, old stone walls, and interesting terrain. The Rines Forest is part of a 900 acre contiguous block of unfragmented forest habitat. The Rines Forest is a mixture of 60-year-old red pine plantations, old pasture fields grown up to mixed hardwood-softwood stands, hemlock stands, and floodplain forests. The paths throughout the woods are well-marked with the colored markers matching the printed maps. The terrain is very gradual with very little change in elevation. The northwest section of the property can be very wet and should be accessed only in the winter. This area is clearly marked on the maps. The property has large sections of relatively flat sandy soils and terrain where the red pines were planted and a smaller area to the south that is characterized by steep rolling hills interspersed with beautiful cascading streams. The largest stream is Mill Stream which eventually flows into the Presumpscot River and then to Casco Bay. The Rines Forest contains a diversity of plant and animal life. Large hemlock and pine trees, as well as red oak, birch, poplar and maple trees abound. It is the perfect canopy for the forests diverse wildlife, which includes white tail deer, coyote, fox, wild turkey, ruffed grouse, snowshoe hare, fisher, porcupine, hawks, owls, and numerous other wild birds. Signs of black bear and moose have also been seen.Show more
#2 - Knight's Pond Preserve
Knight's Pond and Blueberry Hill
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(90)
Length: 2.8 mi • Est. 1 h 21 m
A network of color-blazed trails (white, blue, red, and yellow) as well as a snowmobile trail across the property allow visitors to explore this recently conserved preserve. A few other short/spur trails provide trail connections or scenic views. Visit Knight's Pond, or follow trails into the woods through oak-hickory forests and alongside vernal pools. Trails crossing Blueberry and Bruce Hills provide for some nice elevation changes. Snowshoeing and skiing are permitted, though trails are not managed specifically for these uses.Show more
#3 - Twin Brook Recreation Area Loop
Cumberland Center, Maine
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Length: 2.1 mi • Est. 55 m
This was once a 140-acre hayfield and is now a 240-acre recreation area. Well-marked trails run through the fields and into the woods. The trail surface is made of wood chips. Some of the trails are at times closed because of erosion, so please respect these signs if you see them and stay off those trails. There are picnic tables and toilet facilities. Lots of people come here to let their dogs run off-leash. This place is open all year.Show more
#4 - Rines Forest Extended Loop
Cumberland Center, Maine
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(23)
Length: 2.3 mi • Est. 1 h
#5 - Cumberland Town Forest
Cumberland Center, Maine
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Length: 1.5 mi • Est. 39 m
The Town Forest was planted in the 1930s. The trail meanders through distinct forest stands. Plantations of red pine, an old field that is now a white pine plantation, a mixed spruce/pine plantation, and mixed hardwood/softwood stands can be seen along the trail. Some signs remain from a self-guided nature trail explaining some of the natural features of the trail. The Town Forest Trail is rustic and can be damp at times especially in spring. Caution is advised for small children and the elderly. The trail is mostly flat but there are sections of the trail require navigating tree roots. There is one section of the trail that is not clearly marked. Roughly a mile into the trail, the trail opens up into a section with tall reeds. Follow the path to the left. You will come out at the bottom of a hill near the town garage. Follow the road up the hill, make a right just before the old school. This leads you to the ball fields. The trail picks up at the far end of the ball fields back to the Town Hall.Show more
#6 - North Falmouth Community Forest Loop [CLOSED]
Cumberland Center, Maine
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(87)
Length: 4.8 mi • Est. 2 h 18 m
As of March 30, 2020, users have reported that there are temporary closures in this area. Please consult the park's website before visiting. North Falmouth Community Forest includes 375 acres of the most remote, and least accessible property in town. As the name suggests, the property is entirely wooded with a mix of hardwood and softwood species. Several well-marked trails have been established on the property, which also connect to Blackstrap Hill Community Forest. Natural Features: NFCF is entirely wooded and home to a variety of species of wildlife, including whitetail deer, turkeys, fishers, snowshoe hares, porcupines, bobcats, a wide variety of songbirds, and an occasional moose and black bear. Several vernal pools are also located on the property. Allowable Uses: Hiking, snowmobiling, mountain biking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, hunting, nature study, and horseback riding are all allowed. Motorized vehicles are prohibited, except snowmobiles on marked trails. Trails are not handicapped accessible. Dogs must be leashed from April 1 to September 30th.Show more