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Best trails in Fort Lauderdale

417 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Fort Lauderdale, Florida? AllTrails has 7 great walking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails around Hugh Taylor Birch State Park or Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Amelia Earhart Park or Virginia Key Park. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 6 easy trails in Fort Lauderdale ranging from 0.7 to 9.3 miles and from 0 to 16 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Fort Lauderdale
Top trails (7)
#1 - Tree Top Loop
Tree Tops Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(94)
Length: 1.7 mi • Est. 42 m
#2 - Hugh Birch State Park Loop
Hugh Taylor Birch State Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(110)
Length: 1.9 mi • Est. 47 m
#3 - Secret Woods Nature Center
Secret Woods Nature Center
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(53)
Length: 1 mi • Est. 24 m
Broward County's first nature center, which opened in September 1978, comprises three vegetative communities found along and influenced by the New River: an inland freshwater cypress/maple wetland, a pond apple/mangrove community along the river, and, farther inland, a laurel oak hammock. The 57-acre site is now designated as an Urban Wilderness Area. Butterfly Island A 3,800-square-foot walk-through butterfly garden where you'll find more than 20 different species of plants that attract butterflies. A 250-foot mulched path winds through the garden and has three benches along the way where you can sit and relax. Among the butterflies commonly seen in the area are the monarch, zebra longwing, cloudless sulphur, queen, gulf fritillary, giant swallowtail, and atala hairstreak. Julia Hall Rustic charm is abundant in this 2,175-square-foot hall, which has tongue-and-groove walls and a ceiling with exposed wooden beams. The room will comfortably seat 75 to 100 people, depending on setup. There is a fully equipped kitchen off the main room, and the adjacent 100-capacity open-air amphitheater measures 2,400 square feet. Wi-Fi is available. Rental of the facility includes chairs and tables (both 60-inch-diameter round tables and 72-by-20-inch rectangular tables are available), as well as use of the kitchen and the amphitheater, which can also be rented separately. The hall is available from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays, Mondays, Thursdays, and Fridays, and from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturdays. (Rental times include setup and cleanup.) Laurel Oak Trail A 1,200-foot mulched nature trail that takes you from a hardwood hammock through a tidal marsh area and back. When you begin your walk along the Laurel Oak Trail, you are surrounded by laurel oaks, live oaks, sabal palms, wild coffee, green- and red-tipped cocoplum, beautyberry, and white stopper. As you continue down the trail, you will come to a series of four bridges that will carry you through a tidal marsh. There you will see leather ferns, pond apple trees, white mangroves, and a variety of palms. You are also likely to see many birds, squirrels, crabs, and lizards. There are several seating areas along the way. New River Trail This 3,200-foot boardwalk trail, constructed almost entirely from recycled plastic lumber, will take you through three different ecosystems. Your journey begins in a hardwood hammock where you are surrounded by native Florida vegetation such as laurel oak trees, sabal palms, white stopper, wild coffee, strangler figs, and cocoplum. As you get closer to the river, you will come to a tidal marsh area. The boardwalk will then rise above the water line, and you will be able to walk through a tidal marsh area that is completely under water during high tide. There you will see leather ferns, red and white mangroves, pond apple trees, and cypress. Monarch Interpretive Center A 2,000-square-foot facility with interpretive displays and hands-on activities focusing on the nature center's flora and fauna. The center opened in October 2002 and includes a working beehive, along with a reptile habitat with snakes native to the area. Three computer kiosks feature interactive programs about plant, animal, and marine life, as well as weather and soil. There are also displays of Native American artifacts, and a mural depicting Native Americans as they approach historic Stranahan House to trade their wares. The center's video room offers presentations on the Everglades and other nature-related topics, available upon request. Public Art and Design The Monarch Interpretive Center is home to a project called Metamorphosis, a ceramic tile floor by Raymond Olivero that represents the flight pattern of the butterfly. The artist also designed brightly colored butterfly "fresco glass" doors to grace the building's entryway. This site-specific, integrated artwork fuses nature with art and design. "I have taken the flight pattern of the butterfly as the basis for the pathway," the artist says in a statement. "I chose the butterfly not only for its unique flight pattern, but also because it is featured at the park, particularly at its entrance area....I also chose the butterfly motif for the butterfly's innate variety and beauty as well as its metamorphosis, which makes it one of nature's mysteries and secrets. In short, the butterfly offers the greatest degree of aesthetic and metaphorical possibilities."Show more
#4 - Warmup Loop
Markham Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(96)
Length: 0.7 mi
#5 - Fort Lauderdale Walking Tour
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(26)
Length: 9.2 mi • Est. 3 h 44 m
This is a walking tour of Fort Lauderdale from bucolic Riverwalk to luxurious Las Olas and the beautiful beaches. First stop on this tour is the jewel in the crown of Fort Lauderdale's efforts to attract more family-friendly tourists: its beautiful waterfront park, the Riverwalk. Located along the historic New River, the 1.5 mile Riverwalk has revitalized Fort Lauderdale's downtown. This walking tour continues over to Las Olas Boulevard, the Rodeo Drive of Fort Lauderdale. This posh pedestrian shopping area is also home to Fort Lauderdale's earliest home, Stranahan House, now a historic museum. Pioneer and trader Frank Stranahan is considered the grandfather of Fort Lauderdale. His turn of the century home and business headquarters provide a peak into Fort Lauderdale's past. Original Victorian furnishings, photos and other memorabilia, plus enthusiastic volunteer guides make Stranahan House a worthwhile stop. Fort Lauderdale is often called the "Venice of America" for its many canals and waterways. Unless you have your own boat, the best way to explore these waterways is aboard a water taxi. While the taxi serves as a mode of public transportation, it's also the best way to get a glimpse into the lifestyles of Fort Lauderdale's rich and famous. Glimpse into the backyards of the mega-mansions that overlook the Intracoastal Waterway and get up close with the multi-million dollar yachts sailing these waters. Show more
#6 - Long Key Natural Area Loop Trail
Long Key Natural Area
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(16)
Length: 0.5 mi • Est. 12 m
At 164.8 acres, this site is one of the largest natural areas managed by Broward County Parks and Recreation. As recently as a century ago this elevated oak hammock was part of a series of islands surrounded by Everglades marshes. Nature Trail: An approximately half-mile trail that winds through the oak hammock. Naturalist-led walks are available, as well as walks around the restored wetlands and to the Baez House. Equestrian Trails: Nearly one and a half miles of trails along the restored wetlands and through the oak hammock, connecting to the Davie Multipurpose Trail.Show more
#7 - Fort Lauderdale Art Beat Walking Tour
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(11)
Length: 9.3 mi • Est. 3 h 48 m
Walking tour of Fort Lauderdale's arts scene including galleries along Las Olas Blvd. and the Broward Center for Performing Arts. This beachside resort city is increasingly making a splash in the Florida art scene. Once famous for being America's college Spring Break capital, it's now displaying world class arts in architecturally impressive venues. On this walking tour you'll cruise through the cultural highlights of the city known as "the Venice of America." Show more