Best trails in Burlingame, California

560 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Burlingame, California? AllTrails has 7 great trail running trails, walking trails, dogs leash trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails around Mount Tamalpais State Park or Castle Rock State Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Almaden Quicksilver County Park or McNee Ranch. Just looking to take a quick stroll? We've got 7 easy trails in Burlingame ranging from 0.7 to 15.2 miles and from 9 to 439 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Burlingame, California
Top trails (7)
#1 - Mills Canyon Nature Area Trail Loop
Mills Canyon Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(202)
Length: 1.5 mi • Est. 50 m
A short walking trail, this is most often used by locals, and can offer a nice oasis in the surrounding residential area. A great spot for birds and wildflowers. Not suitable for strollers or bikes.Show more
#2 - Coyote Point to San Mateo Bridge
Coyote Point Recreation Area
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(144)
Length: 10.4 mi • Est. 4 h 10 m
According to Access Northern California (http://accessnca.org/access-northern-california/explore/explore-detail-view/?site_id=156): The Bay Trail skirts the eastern perimeter of the park, parallel to Coyote Point Drive for much of the way. Starting near the Peninsula Humane Society shelter on Airport Boulevard, you quickly leave the Bay views behind, turning inland to travel past many of the park's amenities. Across Coyote Point Drive is the Poplar Creek Golf Course. Approximately a half-mile in, a grove of eucalyptus trees atop a nearby hill wafts a sweet aroma into the air and, depending on the time of day, provides a little shade. The Bay Trail briefly touches Coyote Point Marina, then travels south out of the park for 2.5 miles to the San Mateo Bridge. No matter where you are on the trail, you can hear planes circling to land at nearby San Francisco International Airport and shots ringing from the shooting range, but the sounds of songbirds and other small animals provide a calming balance to the manmade racket. Coyote Point was once an island separated from the mainland by a large salt marsh that was later filled in. Much of the 670-acre park is flat, except for a few knolls among eucalyptus trees that often reveal scenic overlooks of the marina, the remaining marsh, and the Bay. With an outstanding nature museum, several playgrounds, plentiful picnic areas, a beach, large lawns, and an accessible playground at the Eucalyptus Recreation Area, the park makes a great day-long outing for families. Adults can also enjoy a shooting range, marina, yacht club (not wheelchair accessible), and fishing jetty. Situated on the east side of a tree-shaded knoll in the eastern part of the park, the CuriOdyssey Museum is a top-notch interactive science and education center that allows visitors to observe a variety of native California animals up close. Indoor exhibits include interactive displays, computer activities, videos, and films about Bay Area ecosystems. The open floor plan makes it easy to maneuver. In the outdoor animal habitats you can learn about and get close to various reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and, in the walk-through aviary, nearly two dozen native birds. The butterfly and hummingbird gardens are scenic and peaceful spots in which to rest and watch the wildlife. ACCESSIBILITY: There is firm, designated handicapped-accessible parking with a slope no greater than 2% at the marina, trailheads, promenade, museum, and playground. The trail surface is paved asphalt and it is typically at least six feet wide. It is mostly gentle, all estimated to be 5% or less. Most wheelchair and stroller users will find this trail navigable. The restrooms in the park are partially accessible (most only allow front-transfers, are too shallow to close the stall door, and have no grab bars on the back wall). The most accessible one is by the drop-in picnic area below the museum, which has enough clearance for closing the stall door and pulling alongside the toilet. Numerous picnic areas have accessible tables with a firm and stable path and surface, and at least 27 inches of knee clearance. The most accessible tables are downhill from the CuriOdessey Museum.Show more
#3 - Bayside Park to Robert E Woolley State Park Loop
Bayside Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(31)
Length: 2.1 mi • Est. 51 m
#4 - Bay Trail: Anza Lagoon to Belmont Slough
Burlingame, California
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(51)
Length: 15.2 mi • Est. 6 h 7 m
This is a segment of the San Francisco Bay Trail: a 500 mile long mile trail around the Bay. This is the 4th section of the Bay Trail, taking hikers from Anza Lagoon in Burlingame to Belmont Slough. The section of the Bay Trail between Burlingame and Redwood Shores offers long, continuous stretches of shoreline Trail. In Burlingame, begin at Anza Lagoon. Shortly after crossing the wooden bridge, the trail picks up again south of Fisherman's Park and continues into the 670-acre Coyote Point Recreation Area, along the edge of a golf course and through a large eucalyptus grove. Continuing south, the trail connects directly to San Mateo's Shoreline Park, comprised of Ruder Park and Seal Point Park. Ryder Park features an interactive tidal water system, playgrounds, a kayak and windsurf launch, picnic areas and restored wetlands. Across an elegant 105-foot bicycle/pedestrian bridge over San Mateo Creek is Seal Point Park, a former landfill offering expansive bay views and public art. South of the park, the Bay Marshes boardwalk extends from the trail with views of the mudflats. From here, the trail continues into Foster City, passing underneath the San Mateo Bridge, past Sea Cloud Park and along marshes and mudflats adjacent to Belmont Slough. An interior trail along Marina Lagoon snakes along the edge of this linear waterway. The Foster City section of the trail also connects to a bicycle/pedestrian bridge over Highway 101 that's accessed near the Belmont Sports Complex. A blue bicycle/pedestrian bridge near Oracle connects Foster City to Redwood Shores. Veer right to reach Island Park or a tranquil place to rest along the slough. Continue along the trail adjacent to Belmont Slough towards Redwood Shores Ecological Reserve.Show more
#5 - Robert Woolley Park Trail
Coyote Point Recreation Area
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(53)
Length: 0.7 mi • Est. 17 m
Nice little paved trail around an inlet, good for walking and biking with the whole family. Not the best for rollerblading as the pavement is broken in some places. Accessibility: The trail has a smooth, paved surface and is typically at least five feet wide. It is flat with an average grade of 1% and a max grade of 2%. Most wheelchair and stroller users will find this trail navigable.Show more
#6 - Coyote Point Marina Trail
Coyote Point County Rec Area
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(44)
Length: 0.4 mi • Est. 10 m
According to Access Northern California (http://accessnca.org/access-northern-california/explore/explore-detail-view/?site_id=156): This short loop hike on a breakwater by the marina takes you out onto San Francisco Bay and is very wheelchair-friendly. This trail has the park's best views of San Francisco and other cities in the distance. You can also catch sight of passing boats, windsurfers, and waterfowl. Coyote Point was once an island separated from the mainland by a large salt marsh that was later filled in. Much of the 670-acre park is flat, except for a few knolls among eucalyptus trees that often reveal scenic overlooks of the marina, the remaining marsh, and the Bay. With an outstanding nature museum, several playgrounds, plentiful picnic areas, a beach, large lawns, and an accessible playground at the Eucalyptus Recreation Area, the park makes a great day-long outing for families. Adults can also enjoy a shooting range, marina, yacht club (not wheelchair accessible), and fishing jetty. Situated on the east side of a tree-shaded knoll in the eastern part of the park, the CuriOdyssey Museum is a top-notch interactive science and education center that allows visitors to observe a variety of native California animals up close. Indoor exhibits include interactive displays, computer activities, videos, and films about Bay Area ecosystems. The open floor plan makes it easy to maneuver. In the outdoor animal habitats you can learn about and get close to various reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and, in the walk-through aviary, nearly two dozen native birds. The butterfly and hummingbird gardens are scenic and peaceful spots in which to rest and watch the wildlife. Accessibility: There is firm, designated handicapped-accessible parking with a slope no greater than 2% at the marina, trailheads, promenade, museum, and playground. The trail surface is paved, smooth, and it is typically at least six feet wide. It is mostly gentle, all 5% or less estimated grade. There are benches and fishing spots along the way, but fishing from a wheelchair requires casting over the riprap. The restrooms in the park are partially accessible (most only allow front-transfers, are too shallow to close the stall door, and have no grab bars on the back wall). The most accessible one is by the drop-in picnic area below the museum, which has enough clearance for closing the stall door and pulling alongside the toilet. Numerous picnic areas have accessible tables with a firm and stable path and surface, and at least 27 inches of knee clearance. The most accessible tables are downhill from the CuriOdessey Museum.Show more
#7 - Coyote Point Shoreline Trail
Coyote Point County Rec Area
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(15)
Length: 1.1 mi • Est. 27 m
According to Access Northern California (http://accessnca.org/access-northern-california/explore/explore-detail-view/?site_id=156): The shoreline trail is a good spot for birdwatching and for identifying planes on their approach to San Francisco International Airport. This trail follows one side of the harbor, then curves around to the Bay. A variety of birds can be seen in the surrounding wetlands, so bring binoculars. Coyote Point was once an island separated from the mainland by a large salt marsh that was later filled in. Much of the 670-acre park is flat, except for a few knolls among eucalyptus trees that often reveal scenic overlooks of the marina, the remaining marsh, and the Bay. With an outstanding nature museum, several playgrounds, plentiful picnic areas, a beach, large lawns, and an accessible playground at the Eucalyptus Recreation Area, the park makes a great day-long outing for families. Adults can also enjoy a shooting range, marina, yacht club (not wheelchair accessible), and fishing jetty. Situated on the east side of a tree-shaded knoll in the eastern part of the park, the CuriOdyssey Museum is a top-notch interactive science and education center that allows visitors to observe a variety of native California animals up close. Indoor exhibits include interactive displays, computer activities, videos, and films about Bay Area ecosystems. The open floor plan makes it easy to maneuver. In the outdoor animal habitats you can learn about and get close to various reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and, in the walk-through aviary, nearly two dozen native birds. The butterfly and hummingbird gardens are scenic and peaceful spots in which to rest and watch the wildlife. Accessibility: There is firm, designated handicapped-accessible parking with a cross-slope no greater than 2% at the marina, trailheads, promenade, museum, and playground. The trail surface is paved and it is typically at least six feet wide. It is flat, all estimated to be 1% or less in grade. Most wheelchair and stroller users will find this trail navigable. The restrooms in the park are partially accessible (most only allow front-transfers, are too shallow to close the stall door, and have no grab bars on the back wall). The most accessible one is by the drop-in picnic area below the museum, which has enough clearance for closing the stall door and pulling alongside the toilet. Numerous picnic areas have accessible tables with a firm and stable path and surface, and at least 27 inches of knee clearance. The most accessible tables are downhill from the CuriOdessey Museum.Show more