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Best trails in Alamo

2,452 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Alamo, California? AllTrails has 24 great hiking trails, trail running trails, mountain biking trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails around Mount Tamalpais State Park or Mount Diablo State Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like McNee Ranch or Lafayette Reservoir Recreation Area. Ready for some activity? There are 16 moderate trails in Alamo ranging from 2.1 to 8.2 miles and from 341 to 2,020 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Alamo
Top trails (24)
#1 - Rocky Ridge View and Elderberry Loop Trail
Las Trampas Wilderness Regional Preserve
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Length: 4.7 mi • Est. 2 h 39 m
Take a stroll around the tall rolling grassy hills east of San Francisco in the Las Trampas Regional Wilderness. You climb almost 1000 feet in the first mile, but then it’s an easy amble along the ridge with stunning views in every direction. Wildflower lovers will love the springtime scenery of Las Trampas Regional Wilderness, but when the blooms have faded this East Bay park still has plenty to marvel at. Eagle-eyed hikers in autumn and winter will spot birds of prey amongst the gliding turkey vultures, and there's also the chance of a golden eagle sighting.Show more
#2 - Ringtail Cat, Madrone, Las Trampas Ridge and Corduroy Hills Loop
Las Trampas Regional Park
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Length: 8.2 mi • Est. 4 h 23 m
Las Trampas Regional Wilderness offers a true sense of wilderness in the Bay Area, with an expanded trail system that allows hikers to enjoy its remote and rugged areas. The park’s size and terrain allow visitors a feeling of privacy and escape from urban hustle and bustle. Two major Bay Area faults helped form the steep and rocky hills. This geologically diverse park contains a great variety of rock, from volcanic Pinole Tuff, to metamorphic, fossil-bearing El Sobrante formation, to the ancient beach and shoreline sandstone of the Orinda formation. If you stay vigilant, you may see a fossil on the Las Trampas Ridge Trail. Be sure to carry plenty of water; the park’s water supply is inconsistent, and water may be unavailable at any time. This route explores the northern portion of the park. The trails traverse a variety of terrains from flat grasslands, shaded woodlands, and beautiful, rolling ridgeback hills. This route offers scenic views of the surrounding areas. There are no bathrooms or water at the staging area or along the route, so please come prepared. Park at Ringtail Cat Staging Area, and enter the park through the fence opening, making a left onto Ringtail Cat Trail. Go through a gate, bearing left at the next trail post, and continue to ascend on Ringtail Cat Trail. At the next trail post, you will continue straight onto the Madrone Trail. Follow Madrone past the next trail post, staying to the right. Remain on Madrone Trail for just over 2 miles, passing over a seasonal stream and through shaded portions. The trail will take you uphill to a nice bluff that opens to landscape views of the East Bay. There is a bench here; a good place to take a break. At the next intersection go through the cattle gate and turn left onto Las Trampas Ridge Trail. In a short distance, the trail crosses private property; access is allowed for trail use only, so please remain on the trail. Follow Las Trampas Ridge Trail passing through another cattle gate and staying right to keep on the trail. At the next trail post, turn left onto the Corduroy Hills Trail. This beautiful trail is narrow and steep, snaking through sandstone outcrops among diverse chaparral plants. Take a left at the next trail post to stay on Corduroy Hills, descending the steps. Corduroy Hills will connect with Madrone Trail at the bottom of the hill. Turn left onto Madrone Trail. Follow it around the bend, and make a right to descend the way you originally came up. Be sure to continue onto Ringtail Cat Trail and follow it back to the staging area where you began.Show more
#3 - Las Trampas Peak
Las Trampas Regional Park
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Length: 4.2 mi • Est. 2 h 24 m
This loop passes through oak and bay forest, chaparral, and grassland, on its way to high grounds with great views. No bicycles on the Chamise Trail or single-track segment of the Las Trampas Ridge Trail. ( Bicyclists wishing to ride to Las Trampas Peak must follow the Bollinger Canyon Trail uphill to the multi-use part of the Las Trampas Ridge Trail).Show more
#4 - Alamo, Briones to Mt. Diablo Regional Trail, Stage Ravine and Little Yosemite Valley Loop
Diabio Foothils Regional Park
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Length: 6.5 mi • Est. 3 h 17 m
Diablo Foothills is an imposing and inspiring gateway to the beautiful parklands of Mt Diablo State Park and Walnut Creek Open Space. The foothills’ 1,060 acres are valued for their interesting geologic formations, their sweeping panoramas of the San Francisco Bay Region and the rural quality of the adjacent rolling grasslands. This route starts out in a suburban neighborhood and follows a regional trail to take you quickly into rustic parklands. You will enjoy rolling hills of scattered oak woodland, beautiful rock outcrops, and a meandering, seasonal creek as you make your way around the loop. In Pine Canyon, keep your eyes open for peregrine falcons, as they are known to use the rocky cliffs for nest sites. Make sure to bring water and use the restroom before you take off for the hike; there are no amenities in the staging area. Dogs are not allowed on the trails in Diablo State Park. Park at the Livorna Staging Area, cross Livorna Road, and make the first right onto Serafix Road. Once on Serafix Road, take an immediate left through three fence posts to access the Alamo Trail. Follow Alamo Trail behind the housing development and uphill through a cattle gate. Continue uphill past the next trail marker, making your way past the water tank. At the next trail marker turn right onto Hanging Valley Trail. Continue until the next intersection where you will turn right onto the Briones-To-Mt. Diablo Regional Trail. Shortly, you will pass through the gate that divides EBRPD parklands and Mt. Diablo State Park. Stay on the trail as it goes over the rolling hills, passing the giant outcrops of rocks on your right. At the fork in the road stay to the right; at the next trail post, turn left onto Little Yosemite Trail. Follow Little Yosemite Trail as it winds along the hill and follows the seasonal creek. Cross the small wooden footbridge and continue straight; the trail will become Stage Road Trail. Follow Stage Road Trail to the left for about .75 miles and then turn left onto Fairly Lantern Trail which leads you to Buckeye Ravine Trail. Ascending the hill, Buckeye Ravine Trail will lead you steeply through the narrows of two hills. At the plateau, make a left at the next trail post onto Mokelumne Coast-To-Crest Trail. At the next immediate fork in the road stay to the left and stay on Mokelumne Coast-To-Crest Trail for .81 miles. Turn right at the next trail post onto Hanging Valley Trail for .34 miles. At the next trail post make a left, continuing downhill on Alamo Trail. Alamo Trail will take you all the way back to the Livorna Staging Area where you parked.Show more
#5 - Pine Creek and Wall Point Trail
Mount Diablo State Park
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Length: 4 mi • Est. 2 h 5 m
#6 - Camille To Sulphur Creek
Las Trampas Regional Park
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Length: 5.5 mi • Est. 3 h 28 m
#7 - Del Amigo Trail to Madrone and Virgil Williams Trail
Las Trampas Regional Park
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Length: 3.4 mi • Est. 1 h 55 m
Take the Del Amigo trail to the Madron Trail. This will lead you to the Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site.Show more
#8 - Las Trampas and Rocky Ridge Loop
Las Trampas Regional Park
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Length: 14.8 mi • Est. 8 h 29 m
#9 - Madrone Trail and Dewies Birthday Loop
Las Trampas Regional Park
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Length: 3.8 mi • Est. 2 h 8 m
#10 - Camille Trail
Las Trampas Regional Park
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Length: 2.1 mi • Est. 1 h 13 m
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