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Best trails in Supai

2,066 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Supai, Arizona? AllTrails has 8 great hiking trails, views trails, river trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. You'll also find some great local park options, like Havasupai Reservation. Gearing up for a challenge? There are 6 hard trails in Supai ranging from 5.1 to 28.7 miles and from 2,755 to 6,250 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Supai
Top trails (8)
#1 - Havasu Falls, Mooney Falls, and Beaver Falls
Havasupai Reservation
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(829)
Length: 24.5 mi • Est. Multi-day
Hikers must get a permit from the Havasupai Indian Reservation for this hike. You must get them well in advance. This is a very popular overnight backpacking trip. There are several variations hikers can do, including various falls, the confluence with the Colorado River, and the town of Supai. The Havasupai Indian Reservation is not part of the Grand Canyon National Park, but you cannot tell that from the scenery. From your very first step at the trailhead parking lot until your return at the end of your trip, you will be swiveling your head side to side to take it all in. The water is a turquoise blue/green and the perfect way to refresh the tired legs and back after the 12 mile trek down to the campground. The parking lot at the trailhead is stunning. It is perched more than 1000 feet above the valley floor and provides one of the best vistas of the trip. The trail starts with a steep descent down the face of the box canyon to the valley floor on a series of switchbacks. Be on the lookout for the approaching mules. They have the right-of-way, and won't stop to wait for you to move to the side. Once you reach the valley floor, the trail bends to the north and follows the wash for 8 miles into the town of Supai. Along the way, the canyon walls draw closer and the surroundings become more grand. You get a sense for the true size of the canyon walls when then tower hundreds of feet straight up as you make your way down the canyon. There is more shade in this narrow section of trail. The sun doesn't have the angle to penetrate the canyon and it helps to keep temperatures down. In this slot section ( which starts at about mile 7), you really need to watch for the mule packs. As they approach, move to the canyon wall side and not the cliff side. At the end of the slot section, it opens and the Havasu Creek comes in from the right side. As you cross the open expanse, following the trail as it curves to the left, you will hear the water for the first time. It comes into view as you enter the heavier vegetation. The town of Supai is close. You will follow the irrigation channel into Supai. The two miles following the town of Supai are packed with waterfalls, blue-green water, and tons of photo opportunities. It's just 2 miles to Havasu Falls from Supai. The campground and Mooney Falls are just beyond that. Visitors must camp overnight at either the campground near Havasu Falls or the Havasupai Lodge in Supai. Some adventurous hikers continue on to reach the confluence with the Colorado River.Show more
#2 - Havasupai Trail to Supai
Havasupai Reservation
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(754)
Length: 14.5 mi • Est. 7 h 18 m
This route is part of a multi-day backpacking trip through Havasu Creek Canyon. Hikers must get permits to hike this area. There are no day-hikes, so you must stay overnight if you enter the canyon. This a very popular route, so permits are hard to come by. Please contact the Havasupai Indian Reservation for permits. Depending on your physical ability/timeframe, there are several different variations you can take. Most hikers stay at either the Havasupai Lodge in Supai or the Havasupai Campground near Havasu Falls. Two miles past Supai you will come across Havasu Falls, then Mooney Falls, then Beaver Falls. Some adventurous hikers may choose to go all the way to the confluence with the Colorado River. The Havasupai Indian Reservation is not part of the Grand Canyon National Park, but you cannot tell that from the scenery. From your very first step at the trailhead parking lot until your return at the end of your trip, you will be swiveling your head side to side to take it all in. The parking lot at the trailhead is stunning. It is perched more than 1000 feet above the valley floor and provides one of the best vistas of the trip. The trail starts with a steep descent down the face of the box canyon to the valley floor on a series of switchbacks. Be on the lookout for the approaching mules. They have the right-of-way, and won't stop to wait for you to move to the side. Once you reach the valley floor, the trail bends to the north and follows the wash for 8 miles into the town of Supai. Along the way, the canyon walls draw closer and the surroundings become more grand. You get a sense for the true size of the canyon walls when then tower hundreds of feet straight up as you make your way down the canyon. There is more shade in this narrow section of trail. The sun doesn't have the angle to penetrate the canyon and it helps to keep temperatures down. In this slot section ( which starts at about mile 7), you really need to watch for the mule packs. As they approach, move to the canyon wall side and not the cliff side. At the end of the slot section, it opens and the Havasu Creek comes in from the right side. As you cross the open expanse, following the trail as it curves to the left, you will hear the water for the first time. It comes into view as you enter the heavier vegetation. The town of Supai is close. You will follow the irrigation channel into Supai. The two miles following the town of Supai are packed with waterfalls, blue-green water, and tons of photo opportunities. It's just 2 miles to Havasu Falls from Supai. The campground and Mooney Falls are just beyond that.Show more
#3 - Mooney Falls from Supai
Havasupai Reservation
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(176)
Length: 5.2 mi • Est. 2 h 28 m
This hike is part of a multi-day backpacking trip in the Havasu Creek Canyon. You cannot drive directly to this hike. Please consult AllTrails' other hikes in this area if you are determining how to reach Supai. Visitors have the choice of camping at the Havasu Falls Campground, or at the Havasupai Lodge in Supai. From Supai, likely the second day of your hike, you can continue on to Havasu, Mooney, and Beaver Falls. Some adventurous hikers might even consider hiking all the way to the confluence with the Colorado River. There are for-hire guides that are available for these strenuous sections. The map shown here has the hiker starting in Supai. If you stay at the Havasu Falls Campground, the hike to Mooney Falls would be shorter.Show more
#4 - The Confluence from Havasupai Campground
Havasupai Reservation
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(145)
Length: 17.3 mi • Est. 8 h 59 m
This hike is part of a multi-day backpacking trip in the Havasu Creek Canyon. You cannot drive directly to this hike. Please consult AllTrails' other hikes in this area if you are determining how to reach the Havasupai Campground. A permit is required from Havasupai Indian Reservation. These permits are very sought after and booked well in advance! Most hikers either stay at the Havasupai Lodge in Supai, or the Havasupai Campground near Havasu Falls. The map shown here has the hiker starting at the Havasupai Campground. If you stay at the lodge, add several miles to the length of the trip listed here. This hike passes Havasu, Mooney, and Beaver Falls, eventually reaching the confluence with the Colorado River. It can be very difficult and technical at times. Be prepared to do some route-finding and get wet. This would likely be a 3 day trip. First day from trailhead, through Supai, to the campground near Havasu Falls. Second day, campground to the confluence and back, then third day hiking back to the trailhead.Show more
#5 - Mooney and Beaver Falls from Havasupai Campground
Havasupai Reservation
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(148)
Length: 5.1 mi • Est. 2 h 50 m
This hike is part of a multi-day backpacking trip in the Havasu Creek Canyon. You cannot drive directly to this hike. Please consult AllTrails' other hikes in this area if you are determining how to reach the Havasupai Campground. A permit is required from Havasupai Indian Reservation. These permits are very sought after and booked well in advance! Most hikers either stay at the Havasupai Lodge in Supai, or the Havasupai Campground near Havasu Falls. The map shown here has the hiker starting at the Havasupai Campground. If you stay at the lodge, add several miles to the length of the trip listed here. This hike passes Havasu, Mooney, and Beaver Falls, eventually reaching the confluence with the Colorado River. It can be very difficult and technical at times. Be prepared to do some route-finding and get wet. This would likely be a 3 day trip. First day from trailhead, through Supai, to the campground near Havasu Falls. Second day, campground to the various waterfalls and back, then third day hiking back to the trailhead.Show more
#6 - Thunder River Trail from Indian Hollow Parking Area
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray Star(3)
Length: 28.7 mi • Est. Multi-day
#7 - Grand Canyon via Whitmore Canyon Trail
Grand Canyon Parashant National Monument
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(9)
Length: 1.6 mi • Est. 1 h 11 m
Fun hike down the Grand Canyon via Whitmore Canyon. Interesting hexagonal basalt formations and great views. The hardest part is getting to the trail head which is only 80 miles from St. George. The drive takes about 3 hours. The last 10 miles takes about 1.5 hours because of the rough terrain over the ancient lava fields. The hike itself is less than 2 miles out and back with only 900 feet of elevation change from the rim to the Colorado River.Show more
#8 - Schmutz Spring
Grand Canyon National Park
moderateGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray Star
Length: 5.5 mi • Est. 3 h 28 m