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Best trails in Grand Canyon

9,255 Reviews
Looking for a great trail near Grand Canyon, Arizona? AllTrails has 68 great hiking trails, trail running trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. If you're looking for the best trails in Grand Canyon National Park, we've got you covered. You'll also find some great local park options, like Little Colorado River Navajo Tribal Park or Grand Canyon Navajo Tribal Park. Gearing up for a challenge? There are 41 hard trails in Grand Canyon ranging from 3.4 to 72.6 miles and from 2,342 to 8,238 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!
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Map of trails in Grand Canyon
Top trails (68)
#1 - Bright Angel Trail to Bright Angel Campground and River Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(1414)
Length: 18.4 mi • Est. 10 h 24 m
Note: As of September 2020, Silver Bridge is closed due to structural safety concerns. All hikers must use the Black Bridge to cross the Colorado River, adding distance for those hiking the Bright Angel trail. Please check here for more information: https://www.nps.gov/grca/learn/news/silver-bridge-temporarily-closed.htm#:~:text=Grand%20Canyon%2C%20AZ%2D%20Effective%20immediately,Grand%20Canyon%20near%20Phantom%20Ranch. Majority of the trail is exposed, so it is better to wear sunscreen. The water spigots are located around mile 1.5 and 3 however it is necessary to also bring your own water. Trekking poles aren't mandatory, but are recommended. Mules and mule trains have the right of way regardless if they are going up or down. Hikers climbing up have the right of way. Leave the wildlife alone. No matter how cute the deer and squirrels look, don't feed them. Fact...squirrel bites is the leading animal related injury to park visitors at the Grand Canyon. Pick up your trash, wear comfortable clothing and sturdy shoes. This trail gets crowded near the top.Show more
#2 - South Kaibab Trail to Ooh Aah Point
Grand Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(982)
Length: 1.7 mi • Est. 42 m
Note: As of September 2020 users have reported that the road to get to Kaibab Trailhead is CLOSED, open only for the shuttle buses. This adds a bit to the hike depending where you have to park and walk. There is parking available at the visitor center or at a lot west of the trailhead. This "halfway" point to Cedar Ridge is a beautiful hike all in its self. If you want to get away from the crowd at the top of the rim ( it can be as busy as Disneyland) but if you don't want to go on an all day hike this is a good compromise. Always bring water when hiking any distance in the Grand Canyon.Show more
#3 - South Kaibab Trail to Cedar Ridge
Grand Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(710)
Length: 2.8 mi • Est. 1 h 7 m
Note: As of September 2020 users have reported that the road to get to Kaibab Trailhead is CLOSED, open only for the shuttle buses. This adds a bit to the hike depending where you have to park and walk. There is parking available at the visitor center or at a lot west of the trailhead. The South Kaibab Trail begins south of Yaki Point on Yaki Point Road. Day hike to the mule hitching post at Cedar Ridge is 3 miles (round trip). Best views for a relatively short hike. Steep trail, no water, little shade. Water available seasonally at the trailhead. Upper portion of the trail may be extremely icy in winter or early spring and in summer months watch out for thunderstorms. This is the only trail at Grand Canyon National Park that holds true to a ridgeline descent. This trail is also the quickest way to the bottom. The trail begins with a series of tight switchbacks. After these initial switchbacks, the trail traverses below Yaki Point to Ooh Ah Point (the first panoramic view of the canyon). From Ooh Ah Point on, the trail follows the top of a ridgeline and is consequently without shade. Several broad and steeply plunging switchbacks later, hikers reach Cedar Ridge. The South Kaibab Trail was constructed to bypass Ralph Cameron's Bright Angel Trail. Cameron, who owned the Bright Angel Trail and charged a toll to those using it, fought dozens of legal battles over several decades to maintain his personal business rights. These legal battles inspired the Santa Fe Railroad to build its own alternative trail, the Hermit Trail, beginning in 1911 before the National Park Service went on to build the South Kaibab Trail beginning in 1924. In this way, Cameron inadvertently contributed to the greater network of trails currently available for use by canyon visitors.Show more
#4 - Grand Canyon Rim: Mules to Mather Point
Grand Canyon National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(709)
Length: 5.3 mi • Est. 2 h 7 m
The entire Rim Trail stretches from the South Kaibab Trailhead west to Hermit's Rest and is approximately 13 miles long. The trail is mostly paved and lined with markers to show you how far you've traveled both in feet and years (an earth-time line if you will). There is no water available along the trail but there are areas of shade. Also has types of rocks formed around the time marked on the trail. Very fun for kids and educational too. Mather Point is the closest Grand Canyon overlook to the visitor's center. Dogs are allowed on-leash on the Rim Trail but not on the shuttle busses so plan accordingly. Accessibility: The trail is paved, smooth, typically at least five feet wide, and has a lot of flat stretches but there are some places where the grade exceeds 8% that may not be accessible for wheelchairs or strollers without assistance. The trail may be slippery due to snow in the winter or thunderstorms in the summer so use caution. There are wheelchair-accessible shuttle stops close to the trail and parking lots along the trail to access it at different points.Show more
#5 - Three-Mile Resthouse via Bright Angel Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(660)
Length: 5.4 mi • Est. 3 h 35 m
#6 - 1.5 Mile Resthouse via Bright Angel Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
moderateYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(464)
Length: 2.9 mi • Est. 1 h 57 m
#7 - Plateau Point Trail via Bright Angel Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(441)
Length: 12.2 mi • Est. 7 h 3 m
#8 - South Kaibab Trail to Skeleton Point
Grand Canyon National Park
hardYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(334)
Length: 5.6 mi • Est. 3 h 16 m
Note: as of July 20, 2020, users have reported that the road to the parking lot is closed so you can park on the side of the road, which will add an extra couple miles to your hike. Also shuttles aren’t running, so you can park at Pipe Creek Vista and hike about a mile on the Rim Trail to get to the trailhead.Show more
#9 - Grand Canyon Rim Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray Star(197)
Length: 12.7 mi • Est. 5 h 6 m
This trail is the entire Rim Trail, stretching from the South Kaibab Trailhead west to Hermit's Rest, approximately 13 miles long. The trail is mostly paved and lined with markers to show you how far you've traveled both in feet and years (an earth-time line if you will). There is no water available along the trail but there are areas of shade. The section between Monument Creek Vista and Hermit's Rest is also called the Hermit Road Greenway Trail. A mostly flat walk with stunning views of the canyon. There are several shuttle stops along the way, allowing you to pick and chose the areas you want to explore. Leashed pets are allowed on the trail, but not on the shuttle busses so plan accordingly. From many of the overlooks, you will have unrestricted views to the other side of the canyon, and sometimes as far as 40 miles along the canyon. If you are looking for a place to stop to watch the sunset, try Hopi point (although if it is too crowded, try nearby Mohave Point). The Canyon is best seen during the golden hours (the hour after sunrise and before sunset), when the light is low and the canyon walls turn into amazing shades of red and orange. Accessibility: The trail is mostly paved, typically at least four feet wide, and has a lot of flat stretches (average grade 2%) but there are some places where the grade exceeds 10% that may not be accessible for wheelchairs or strollers without assistance. The steep sections have been marked with waypoints on the map. Between Powell Point and Monument Creek Vista the trail is a three-foot wide dirt trail. The trail may be slippery due to snow in the winter or thunderstorms in the summer so use caution. There are wheelchair-accessible shuttle stops close to the trail such as Powell Point and Hermit's Rest, and parking lots along the trail to access it at different points. Please note, these two shuttles run between March 1 and November 30. Show more
#10 - Shoshone Point Trail
Grand Canyon National Park
easyYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow Star(300)
Length: 2.1 mi • Est. 57 m
This easy, family-friendly trail starts in a ponderosa pine forest and ends at a picnic area with beautiful views from Shoshone Point. Accessibility: The parking lot is dirt and not labeled. The trail surface is dirt, typically at least five feet wide, and it is mostly flat with an average grade is 3%. Trail may be bumpy if there have been areas washed out or roots and rocks exposed. Also may be muddy and slippery. The steepest section is at the end of the trail past 0.9 miles, where the grade is above 8%.Show more
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