Explore the most popular trail running trails near Grand Canyon with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

stunning views, but it's not really a trail. it's a paved walk around the edge of the canyon hence why I have only rated it three stars.

amazing trail! definitely difficult on the last 3 miles going up to bright angel trail. went in aug 11th, temp was about 105 deg. take at least 4 liters of water per person. I took 2 and still wasn't enough. barely made it to the next water point on the Colorado river. make sure you bring electrolytes in any form. the heat and sweat will drain you! salty snacks are a must and maybe some extra socks if you wanna take a dip in a tiny body of water. will be a while till I do this one again.

So good and easy for kids! Beautiful views at the end, it would be amazing at sunrise/sunset

hiking
7 days ago

Ideal for families and anyone with disabilities because a good portion of this trail is paved. If you're a hiker, it's not a hike, it's a walk. ...but a walk with epic views.

Not much more to say than what has said in the reviews already. We got in to Flagstaff the night before (from NC) and had little time to adjust to the elevation (or the heat). We packed plenty of water (thankfully) and needed our trekking poles for the switchbacks on the way up. We're all relatively fit and active, so this wasn't too hard on the body, but the knees took a beating.

You'll find solitude at Skeleton Point if you hit the trail before 7 - we were the only ones there when we reached at about 8:30. On the way back up, we met throngs of 'tourists' who plunged into the canyon with fervor and little hiking savvy - jean shorts, a single bottle of water and cameras slung around their necks. Very global groups, too. Plenty of languages were echoing on the trail.

The scenery is second-to-none. You will never see something as expansive as this canyon, and the experience is breathtaking. We chose the South Kaibab route because it 1) is less traveled than the Bright Angel and 2), is shaded on the way up, past Ohh Ahh Point (at least before noon).

The trek gave me inspiration to someday take it to the bottom, or possibly a rim-to-rim.

Beautiful scenery all the way. Great shot of the river just beyond the “skeleton” sign. Well worth the uphill and switchbacks you’ll face on the way back. Return Hike is completely exposed to early morning sun until you pass ooh-ahh point.

Beautiful hike! Incredible views. It’s not the easiest hike on the way back up but definitely worth it.

This is a great hike with absolutely stunning views. We went on Aug 1 so it was hot-definitely bring lots of water as you will need it. This hike is amazing and when we were on skeleton point we were the only hikers despite it being approximately 1 pm. Hiking to this point allows views of the river below which is also really nice. As others have stated the return trip is a bit steep and tiring in the hot sun but definitely worth it.

best kept secret.
super impressed with the view. 240 degrees.
take a lunch and a book.
spend a lazy afternoon in quiet!

This is an easy and enjoyable hike for an amazing and uncrowded view of the Canyon. We did it at sunset and took a picnic with us. It’s my favorite hike at the Grand Canyon. Be sure to hike all the way out to the rocky overlook, but I wouldn’t take small children out there.

The views are incredible. If going from South Kaibab to Bright Angel the last 3 miles up to the top of the rim can be pretty brutal. Fortunately there are plenty of places to rest. My girlfriend and I did the hike in 2 days and stayed at the night at Bright Angel campground. We parked at the backcountry visitor center and shuttled to the South Kaibab trailhead, and then back to the backcountry center when we re-emerged at Bright Angel. The weather was really quite different at the rim compared to the base. It was snowing at the rim, but at the base we were in shorts and t-shirts. So be aware of what layers you might need to bring depending on the time of year you go.

Short, easy, and really cool at the end! Has a restroom also. No hills.

We only went a few miles in due to a late start. The trail is very well maintained, and heavily trafficked, but worth it. I imagine if you start early you’ll avoid most of the crowds and be less burdened by summer heat. I’ll make the trip back and go all the way down at some point.

walking
27 days ago

What a great hike! Very desolate with little to no people on the walk to the point. There was actually a wedding the first day we went!! Very jealous we didn’t think of having our ceremony there as you can truly get an incredible panoramic view of the canyon. Highly recommend for everyone!! Strollers/wheelchairs could easily be pushed there

hiking
1 month ago

Beautiful views! Short, easy hike with massive payoffs! Toilet available at the end, along with picnic tables and grill for picnicking while watching the sunrise or sunset over the south rim of the canyon.

Great trail for views, varied terrain and a beautiful walk in woods!

hiking
1 month ago

Somewhere in one of the guidebooks about Grand Canyon an author once referred to Boucher as "a classic Grand Canyon beatdown of a trail." We've gone down Boucher twice (Feb '11 and May '16) and I couldn't agree more. I love that description.

A decent snow storm hit the day before our February trip, which was our first time seeing the trail. Shaded parts of the canyon still had 12-18" of snow, obscuring large portions of trail. There were no footprints to follow, either - we were the first to go down.

It became quite stressful. We simply could not find the crucial break in the wall that you need to get down to the next level of canyon safely (see pic from May '16). It took us at least a solid hour of cold, impatient hunting out on those slippery ledges before we spotted an old piece of iron hammered into the top of the chute.

By the time we reached the beach at Boucher Rapids we were in great spirits. Great beach, by the way! One of our guys was so exhausted upon arrival that he fell asleep immediately after setting up his tent. He never made it fully inside -- he just face-planted into the opening, out cold with his butt in the air. It was hilarious. It took at least 20 minutes before someone noticed his legs sticking out in the sand, which made it even funnier. We nudged him in. He was fine, just had his dinner for breakfast the next day.

So yes, Boucher is a classic Grand Canyon beatdown. We did find it much easier the second time around because there is no real guesswork (and no heavy snowfalls, hopefully). I enjoyed it the first time (minus the stressful part) and really loved it the second time. We got a late start the second time, and found a decent dry camp about halfway down.

Boucher is tough and challenging but the views are fantastic and the trail sees very little foot traffic. You could easily have the entire thing to yourself.

We did this trail. we had the place to ourselves from almost 2 hours, then as sunset got close about 4 others families joined us. I don't think you can find a better spot to watch the sun go down. it's absolutely breathtaking and definitely worth the easy, flat 1 mile walk out there

hiking
1 month ago

We did this for an easier walk the day after a more strenuous trial. The views are absolutely breathtaking. You walk a flat road trail with lots of trees up to the canyon, there are spots with tables and a bathroom, if you can bring lunch it would be a great place to eat. You’ll see an area you can continue to walk up, there is a big rock in the middle of you walk out there are the most incredible 365 degree views of the canyon we encountered only 2 or 3 people. A must do if you have some extra time and and to avoid lots of people. I wouldn’t bring kids with you out to the point as it is extremely dangerous but really cool and worth if it you trust yourself

Paved. VIEWS

Did this as a day hike -- about 13 hrs. A long difficult hike but worth every minute. Unbelievable views, and the night sky is incredible. Don't forget to look up!

Amazing views. We completed this train on 6/22. It took us about 3.5 hours to get down and 5.75 hours to get up with 25ish lbs of gear. The hike back up was pretty rough but the views were absolutely stunning.

hiking
1 month ago

Incredible views. Easy paved pretty level walk. Fairly busy but many shops and stops to explore.

Great views, and an awesome hike. Got on the trail at 7:45 am. Cool trip down to Cedarridge by nine. We felt fine so we went another 30 min. The heat was building so we headed up. It took three hours to get up to the top. You got to bring plenty of h2o. I took 75 ounces and only had a sip left. I got to the top and saw a bobcat grab a squirrel, so hold on to your little ones.

We started at Hermits Rest to Hermits Creek Campgrounds for 1 night then Hermits creek to Granite Rapids Campground for 1 night, then from Granite Rapids Campground to Monument Creek Campground for a night before the hike out. You do need permits far in advance for any overnight camping. We booked the permits in January for our trip starting April 20-25th.

Hermits Rest to Hermits Creek is an AMAZING hike and the views are something words can’t even express. You truly have to see this in person to grasp how incredible the Grand Canyon really is. When we started at the rim it was snowing and pretty cold with rain clouds to cover us with shade thank god! The trail was well marked with heavy traffic for the first 2 miles. Following Santa Maria Springs there is almost no one on the trail which is what we wanted. The snow stopped and it quickly got warmer the feather we got down, making us stop to take off all our layers, I was down to a tank top and warm leggings.

The rain clouds gave the Canyon a very mystical magical, eerie look which was incredible. There is almost no shade on this trail so we got very lucky on the hike down. About half way to our campsite at Hermits Creek a massive rain storm came through making us have to creep between two huge boulders to hurry up and cover our packs. We pushed through the rain and keep trekking as there was no cover. After a what I would call fun hike in the rain we got to our camp site and it stopped raining as we walking in, 3 hours later. It took us about 5 hours total from Hermits Rest to Hermits Creek.

Great campground with a new bathroom hut that was surprisingly nice! If you get to the Campground early enough there is a huge cliff overlooking the waterfall and spring we would have loved to have! After we hung everything out to dry and set up camp we went down to the waterfall and explored a bit! Great pools to swim in that are very cold but awesome! Views are incredible and all in all great Campground.

Only problem was we were soaking wet and so were out packs so when we hung it out to dry over night the temperature dropped and everything froze, and since it’s in a Canyon there was no sun until almost 10AM to help dry it out before our next hike to Granite Rapids over the Tonto Trail. So we got a late start and it was very hard due to the sun at that time with no shade or water before hitting Granite Rapids.

Started hiking on the 05/30 at 0425 am (catching the Hikers Express from the Visitor Center) with headlamps on. Only two other hikers starting with us. Arrived at Skeleton Point at about 0555. We took a 30 minute break to enjoy the scenery and have a small breakfast. Started the ascend at about 0630. On the way up, we took countless photos and another break (30 minutes or so) at Cedar Ridge. We eventually arrived at the South Kaibab trailhead at 0930.

The hike was well maintained and provided scenic views all the time. In order you really get to enjoy the hike, I'd recommend starting (very) early as a) it heats up quickly (90°+ even at 1000 am) and b) you'll meet only a handful of people up until 0730.

Please remember to bring plenty of water/snacks/electrolytes, prepare for a strenuous ascend and to take your time.

hiking
2 months ago

hardest trail i ever worked on.

Started the trail today (6/5) at 10am which was a mistake. As we came down it is a breeze, smooth sailing with much of it shaded as the sun was behind the canyon wall. We originally intended to stop at Cedar Ridge, but felt good enough to continue. The way back was strenuous. The temperature jumped to about 100 in the canyon and the sun was beating. My brother began showing signs of heat exhaustion and we had to take many stops and eventually ran out of water about .7 miles from the top, which includes the tough switchbacks that you start on and think nothing of. All said I would definitely do it again, but much earlier, like 7am, and with much more water. The views are solid, but I felt like it would have been much more worth it to buckle down and go to the river and stay the night to return the next day.

Absolutely amazing!! The hike is extremely simple & flat but then you get to the end it’s the most stunning view. The view from the picnic tables is great but nothing like walking out to the ledge. When my husband and I got to the end (10:15am) we were the only people there. Never have I been in such a quiet place. It was so quiet we heard a birds wings flapping as it flew past us. Slowly about ten people came out, which was nice cause we needed some photos. As we left we passed about 15 people. As with most hikes the earlier the better.

on South Bass Trail

backpacking
2 months ago

This is a breathtaking way to experience the Canyon and miss all the crowds, but you're going to have to work for it. A wisely operated high-clearance, two-wheel drive vehicle can make access to the trailhead. Plan on spending two hours + or - 30 minutes on the dirt road heading out and back. Six hours down and seven to eight coming out are reasonable time estimates for fit, experienced backpackers with base pack weights of less than 20 lbs without water. As noted elsewhere, cache water on the Esplenade, (Immediately before dropping down toward Bass Canyon is a great place.) One gallon per person will get you back to the trailhead in hot conditions. We did this hike with daytime highs on the river of 100 degrees and are Phoenix heat-acclimated. I would NOT recommend doing this hike in 80+ degree river temps if you are not used to hiking all day in the heat, as you will find no shade during most of the day. When you get first sight of the river on the way down, start looking for an old fireplace ruin on the left side of the trail. When you reach it, turn right and drop steeply down to the river. There are several beach sites to choose from for camping. Mind the ants and the cold water, and guy out your tent to keep it from blowing into the river. 5 AM is a fine time to start heading back out if you're expecting heat. The last two hours of the hike in are the hardest of this trip. If you can make it down, you can make it out. The load on your feet and legs will feel different going uphill compared to down. Trekking poles and a light-as-you-can make it pack are a must. A practical trip plan might be to drive in and hike down to the Esplanade on the first day, hike to and camp at the river on the second day, then hike out and drive home or camp at the trailhead on the third day. Breaking up the descent would take a lot of stress off of your knees and eliminate any question of ability to make it to the river in one day. For reference: We're in our mid-40's, are reasonably fit and have a lot of backcountry experience. This hike is not for unguided beginners.

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