Explore the most popular wild flowers trails in Alabama with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

this trail was a relaxing walk with a great view.

Hiked this trail this weekend with a group of Boy Scouts and siblings. Great hike for kids. It was easy but still a bit of climbing around the rocks for the kids.

Great walk in the woods in the middle of the city. Easy trail with some interesting historic spots along the way.

An uphill trek begins from the North Trailhead. Once on the ridge, you'll be treated with gorgeous scenic views. Don't miss King's Chair, Eagle's Nest and other views from the ridge. Will definitely be back.

Plenty of water along the trail and the rock gardens along the trail are a real treat for any hiker. One of the best section hikes in the state.

Hiked this yesterday, but only to get to Cheaha Falls which is about 1.5 Miles from Turnip Seed Parking Area.Parking at Turnip seed cross the highway and follow the Silent Trail until it leads to the falls. Great swimming hole for the summer. Pretty area. It was late in the day and we were unsure how far the rest of the trails went or where they led to. I highly recommend picking up a nap from the store at the opening of Cheaha Map.

3 days ago

Short, easy hike with a wonderful view at the end! Highly recommend this trail if you’re looking for a quick, non strenuous trail

Beautiful and runnable for the most part. I did miss a turn at one point and had to backtrack. I would rank this trail as easy. The access road has some rough patches, but I made it fine in my camper van. I will definitely return to explore some more.

great hike for kids. Just dont let them get too close to the edge! Beautiful view!

Hiked this yesterday from the turnipseed trailhead. Great hike. Way more beautiful than I expected.

Only issue was that it was unclear which way the trail went once you got to cheaha falls. There are multiple paths in that area. Chinabee silent trail goes straight across the top of the falls to the other side.

First time hiking in oak mountain. The green trail has a bit of a bite to it. Definitely a moderate trail with various dips and rises across the mountain to the Peavine Fall. We connected to the white trail to the top of the falls. The climb down to the bottom of the fall is a bit tricky an can be slippery climbing out. Taking the green trail back became a little tasking so we took the orange (horse) trail back to the wild life center. It’s a pretty level hike back saved us about 30 minutes (just watch your step). Overall Peavine Falls did not disappoint and the green trail was a welcomed challenge.


A nice hike but the views we're nothing special this time of year. Only two short uphills, the rest is easy walking.

easy trail ... Beautiful waterfalls... when you reach creek cross over and pickup the trail to the right... follow it to Parker falls

great trail.lots of trails that connect with others witch can create some confusion.well worth a day in the woods.

Short trail that connects the park office area with the Alabama Wildlife Center, a hospital for injured wildlife. Name comes from a high boardwalk near the park office that features some caged birds (vultures, hawks, owls, etc.). Note that to do the 1.7 miles loop you also have to use part of the Yellow Trail, not just the Treetop Nature Trail. Nice hike if you are not up for some of the park's more challenging trails.

Nice loop with some flat areas and some steep, rocky areas. 20-foot Peavine Falls is nice when it has enough water, which it frequently does not. The Green Trail keeps going east on the ridgeline and ends down near the park office, so do not miss the right turn on the green-white connector to stay on this loop. Also, there is a nice overlook from the ridgetop Green Trail. Probably the most scenic hike at Oak Mountain though definitely not the longest.

Nice lollipop loop featuring Civil War era iron furnace. Route entirely follows two-track old roads including an iron haul road and a stagecoach road. On the harder side of easy due to length and several small hills. There are also many single-track mountain bike trails here, but if you end up hiking on single-track you have lost the main loop. Overall, a quiet, fairly easy hike with an historical flair.

Maintenance is being conducted. Staff apologetic that a lot of undergrowth and trees were taken out leaving trails needing to be remarked. Caution tape around trees was redirecting me to tracks leading to nowhere. New mulch obscured the trail. Never got beyond the trail head for the 1 mile. Even had two of the locals scratching their heads. No dogs allowed.

10 days ago

I’ve hiked this from numerous trailheads. Thompson is the easiest. If you were on horse trails you started at Borden TR and took 224 Bunyan Hill which is hamstrings going north and a shin-breaker going south...or Thompson and took NW Road. You won’t see anything spectacular on those routes. The best route as far as waterfalls and ease is Sipsey TH past Parker Falls to Big Tree. It’s longer but has better views. Anyone who sets out to see the Big Tree on a day hike is either ill-informed or training for an Ironman. There are shortcuts but, unless you’ve been out there for years, best to stick to the marked trails.

Enjoyed the hike. Pretty stout terrain. Definitely moderate. Not for beginners unless you enjoy being super sore.

Just a lot of fun. They've done a great job if incorporating a lot of hiking into a relatively small area. You could spend a lot of time loving it!

This is a really great extension of the Smith Mountain Fire Tower Trail which is a part of the Cherokee Ridge Alpine Trail Association system (CRATA.org). The trail begins by following the white blazed Fire Tower trail. We made the ascent to the old tower which once was the central tower in a 6 tower network of fire lookouts. We followed the white trail until we connected to the light blue blazed Lakeshore Trail. We followed this a few hundred yards until it connected to the Magenta Blazed Little Smith Mountain trail.
The initial leg of the trail is an easy descent through mixed forest. There are some nice rocky outcrops on early sections of this trail combination, and I expect that this will get pretty shady as the hardwoods take on leaves. The trail turns southeast as you hit the lake. At this point you can take a spur trail to Boat Docks and Island Hop trail (Island Hop will be really fun next winter when the water level goes back down and it becomes accessible again without a swim.)
The trip back up Little Smith Mountain is rocky and narrow. CRATA suggests that it is not for young or unruly children and I tend to agree with them.. While it's not as treacherous as the nearby Deadening trail, it is very narrow in places and the margin for error is small.
The climb back up is through areas that are pretty sparse due to wildfires from a few years ago (and maybe from the tornadoes too). It's a really good place to see Nature reasserting itself in new growth.
We had a fun run in with a nesting hawk. The hawk decided our chihuahua looked like a tasty springtime meal and swooped on him before realizing we were right behind. him. He continued to track us while we were on the mountain.Got some nice photos out of it though.
The return trip is pretty easy. A nice walk in the woods.
I'm looking forward to going back in a few weeks to see how it changes as the lake fills and the trees fill in.

Just finished hiking the 10.25 loop here today. The trails were very well marked but for longer distances you saw some of the same things. To call this a moderate hike is a bit much if you have done any hiking before. Still a gorgeous place to go and see the waterfall.

12 days ago

This was an extremely challenging trail, but it doesn’t get challenging until close to the actual falls and of course the OUT and UP part.

We dropped a car at the Tennessee side and drove back to Alabama side and started there so that we could through hike. I think the through hike was the best idea because we got to see different things which kept it rewarding rather than an out and back situation.

It’s worth it but if it’s rainy it is quite slippery and a little scary. Trekking poles or walking sticks are essential in this sort of situation and would help even if it’s dry when you go.

It as my first time to hike this loop. Fortunately, I have a good sense of direction and a serviceable map of the Cheaha Wilderness Area which I printed from the USDA website beforehand. The Cave Creek section of the trail was poorly marked. I never saw a sign near the Trail Head or the Connector Trail. At one point I wasn't sure what trail I was on. Was I still on Cave Creek or had I pushed past it, moving on to the Nubbin Creek or Odum Scout Trail by then? . My map did not reflect what I was seeing and because of no signage, I had no way to verify my position. Stumbling upon a trail intersection is not good when there are no markings telling me what trail was what. All I knew is that if I took the trail that was heading generally west, I would eventually run into the Pinhoti. I never saw any signage for Cave Creek until I came across another trail intersection aprox a mile from the Pinhoti. Once you get to the Pinhoti, everything is gravy. This trail is wonderfully marked with blue blazes and metal tags, a welcome contrast to Cave Creek. Despite Cave Creek challenging my old Boy Scout skills, I had a wonderful time. And the Pinhoti serves up one gorgeous view after another. I can't wait to go back.

13 days ago

This trip kicked our tail. We went counter clockwise so we could hit the mountain first. Climbing the mountain had tons of rocks so be extremely careful not to twist an ankle. The path down was very similar. Once you make it to Chinnabee Silent Trail near the next railhead it levels out and is incredibly enjoyable for the next 5 miles. trail is 6 miles of rolling hills. You have to cross 3 creeks so be careful to spot the correct trail. The last 3 miles are mostly uphill and we were exhausted. Barely made it due to exhaustion. Having said all this, this is absolutely a trail worth taking. A beautiful view from the top of the mountain, gorgeous waterfalls, rolling hills, canyons, pine thickets, and some killer camping spots. The distance wasn't bad, but the elevation certainly was. Next time I'll make it a 3 day tip and preserve our strength.

A beautiful place! Easy hike in strenuous hike out.

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