Explore the most popular wild flowers trails near Lineville with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.

Nice trail with several overlooks, plane wreckage, and rock formations. After reading some of the posts regarding lack of trail markings, I was fearful of being lost (we are new to hiking). So I bought a paper map, compass, and read many reviews and watched Youtube videos of the trail. In the end, all I needed was the AllTrails Pro app. The Pro app enables you to download maps so that you can view them offline. So, when you lose cell service, GPS allows you to see your location on the map as a blue dot in relation to the red trail outline.

We entered at the Cheaha trail head (a short way down the road from the general store at the top of the mountain). We decided to do the counter-clockwise route since I read that the Pinhoti portion of the loop is more strenuous. Not long into the hike we took a wrong turn (while still on the blue-blazed Pinhoti) and it ended at the road that leads down to the trail head (I looked on a map afterwards and it turns out that this is where the Pinhoti crosses the road and continues on north-east toward Georgia). So I consulted the AllTrails app and found our location (the blue dot that gives your current location) and just followed the trail back to the proper place and continued on. We got confused a couple of other times, but each time we consulted the app and got back on course. The Pinhoti side of the loop was especially narrow in some places with high grass crowding us on the trail, but the blue blazes kept us on track.

Because running the app (like running any other app) will cause the battery to drain as you hike, take a battery pack that will charge your phone when it gets low. Also, because there are so many rocks and roots on the trail, I recommend hiking shoes/boots. Our feet were sore afterwards even though we both wore Merrell Moab 2 shoes, which have soles made for this type of terrain. I guess if you are not doing the entire loop in one day, this may not be a problem.

Be sure to record your hike in the app so that at the end, after you stop recording, the app will provide distance traveled, calories burned (if you set your height and weight in your profile), elevation gain, and a red-line exact map of your route (including your detours). We walked exactly 9 miles (we walked out to the McDill overlook and to several others). I would do this hike again; I think a fall or winter hike would provide a cool, different perspective.

This likely won’t apply to anyone who uses this app, but I have to say it: flip flops aren’t ideal hiking shoes, particularly the $5 Alvin’s Island variety, and I am not sure why anyone would think they were. So, I felt very little pity for all the folks I saw on the trail wearing said shoes and complaining about their difficulties: “they should let people know...yada yada yada.”

Nope...you shouldn’t go for walk in the woods wearing shower shoes. Craziness.

I think this was the trail I did, but I honestly don’t know such were the markings (or lack thereof). So much so, I decided to just set my timer and simply turn around when it went off...didn’t want to get lost.

With that said, it was a great hike with a few scenic spots. It appears beetles have attacked the pine trees.

Beautiful trail!

hiking
26 days ago

Nothing to see here but the waterfalls towards the beginning of the trail. Just wooded and flat areas with a few primitive campsites beyond the falls. If you do decide to trek out further, wear pants! The overgrown grass will slice and prick your legs. There were a few steep inclines and we traversed across rocks in the water at one point, which was not difficult because the water was low. There were stairs near the waterfalls, but some were uneven and loose. The trail is also not well marked. Be careful: we came upon a snake on the trail. It quickly slithered away, but it was a good reminder for us to look before we took a step. Over all, not a difficult trail but also not worth a second trip.

hiking
1 month ago

Did the loop for the first time last week (early June). Counter-clockwise. Obviously the bugs were out and the trail was starting to get overgrown with weeds in a few places. Didn't seem anybody had been on it too recently and lots of spider webs to negotiate. Not bad though, as the hard-packed trail is still easy to follow, but would imagine it would be uncomfortable soon. In some areas I was walking through weeds and shrubs on the trail, so grateful I was in long pants. 1 tick and a couple of chigger bites is what it cost me. Temperature was not bad, but ended up using a lot more water than I thought I would. In the rocky sections of the Pinhoti and stairway area I needed to find the marks on the trees to follow the trail. It was fine, but had to double back a couple of times. That is the most difficult part, the Chinnobee Silent is easy, and the skyway probably moderate. I hiked 13 miles the first day and camped by the water a couple of miles into the skyway trail. I missed the water crossing where I camped and again had to double back past the campsite to find the path. No big deal, just lost a little time. Be careful to notice the painted trees if you are by yourself, and note that the actual path is hard packed and easy to stay on. Looking forward to doing this in the fall, winter or spring when things would be more ideal

This trail needs traffic—foot traffic! It is close to being overwhelmed in sections by weeds. This is a lovely track but quite rugged with roots and rocks, and a couple of challenging ascents. Would not recommend for children under 12. Old timers like me need sturdy footwear and dual trekking poles.

This was a very beautiful trail. A large portion of it winds right beside a stream blotted with lots of drops and a waterfall or two.For me it was a fairly easy trail and only became more inclined halfway through. A good trekking pole would serve most people well. A must see if you are in northeast Alabama.

My only slight negative is that it was highly trafficked, at least compared with most other trails I’ve been on. This could’ve also stemmed from it being Memorial Day weekend however.I like the solitude of a lonely trail, but that is just my preference. Great trail nonetheless!

My family of three set out at the Cheaha trailhead, intending a moderate 6+ mile trek and almost ended up spending the night, unprepared, on this trail. We set out in plenty of time to complete by dark, missed the turn/connector, and ended up hiking ~12 miles, the last of it in the dark and on an abandoned roadbed (with multiple downed trees requiring detours; marked FS 589), gaining 2000 feet elevation. We encountered the connector in the rain and that might be why we missed it--also the connector was not marked at all. This trail is NOT well marked--we almost lost the blue trail several times. I was seriously worried we would end up dehydrated and hypothermic, even at the end of May, after spending the night on the trail.

Remember to take three times as much water as you think you will need, plastic bag for cell phone or electronics needed to mark bearings, backup phone battery, rain gear, bug spray, flashlight, high-energy food, personal first aid kit and a backup map/compass, just in case you end up on a different (longer) trail with no cell phone service. Long pants are essential, as there is a LOT of poison oak on the trail. There was little water. Make sure someone knows your intentions and the trail you intend to hike before you set out. If you get off the trail, notify someone about your location in case things go terribly wrong.

The trail had some pretty flora (gooseberries, wildflowers, mountain laurel, oak leaf hydrangeas and more), but the trek is very difficult and only for those who are good with maps and who have strong legs and hearts. Plan for slow speed, as the elevation change is significant.

At the end (9pm), this felt more like a death march than a pleasant family hike. I will not let this happen again.

backpacking
2 months ago

This trail has it all! Planted pines where you can see for 100s of yards, beautiful waterfalls, and numerous overlooks and elevation changes. I started at the Turnip Seed side of the trail and hiked to Lake Chinnabee. The trail is very well maintained the only spot where it was a little dicey was when you get to Cheaha Falls just continue right over the flat rocks before the falls and follow the trail which works it’s way up the hill to the left to the Cheaha Falls Shelter, where I chose to camp. Devils Den Falls is also an amazing place, perfect for swimming. I would watch for snakes obviously I had one cross the trail in front of me along a stagnant part of the creek. Also there are a lot of bear postings so be aware of that and use a bear bag 200 ft minimum from your campsite if overnighting. I will definitely be back!

Loved this trail. Parts were not marked very well but other than that it is a perfect day hike trail.

backpacking
2 months ago

Skyway Trail to Chinnabee Silent Trail to Pinhoti Trail

This is mine and my wife's second time completing this loop. The first time (going counter-clockwise) was a nightmare. We got lost around the trail change from Chinnabee to Skyway and ended up having to spend an extra night out.

Clockwise was a much easier to navigate route. On Day 1, we went from the Adams Gap trailhead to the Turnipseed Campground just off US 281. You get deep in the woods pretty quickly on this section. Occasionally, there's a nice view of just how secluded you are; the surrounding hills will peek at you as you crest a hill only to disappear as you go down the other side. There is no lack of water as there are several easy stream crossings. As you approach mile 7, the Skyway trail gets narrow and steep leading down to the Cheaha Creek crossing just before it flows into Lake Chinnabee. This crossing can be tricky if there's been recent rainfall but a patient rock hop will keep you dry. Once over the creek, you'll be on the Chinnabee Silent Trail. The Chinnabee Lake parking lot with restrooms is a relatively short walk NW, but the trail continues E. The Devil's Den area after this is a steady, rocky ascent. Once through this area, you'll resume the steady up and down that characterizes the Appalachians and their foothills until you arrive at the Cheaha Falls shelter followed by the beautiful Falls themselves around 9.5 miles in. This is the same water source that flows through Devil's Den and into Lake Chinnabee that you crossed a few miles back. Just over one more mile gets you to the Turnipseed Campground where there is plenty of space to pitch a tent (finding a flat area is a trick, though). There is a $5 honor system fee to camp here. Just past the campground there is a small creek at which I'd advise you fill up your water cache for the night and for the day ahead.

On day 2, we finished the loop with a pretty grueling climb and descent of Talladega Mountain (actually a mountain mass of which Cheaha Mountain is the highest peak). From Turnipseed, you'll gain ~917' in just under 2 miles (a 9% grade on average). As you crest that climb, you're at the Little Caney Head Campground at which you'll take a right onto the Pinhoti Trail. A less steep ascent gets you to 2,217' of elevation, the highest point on this loop (for comparison, Cheaha is at 2,411'). There's an almost unimpeded 180 degree westerly view from this point and it was a much needed 45 minute lunch break for us. After this ridge, you dive down immediately losing 752' of elevation in 0.9 miles (approx. -16%). The Pinhoti undulates but continues to lose elevation for another 2 miles after this. As the loop nears completion, nearly a mile of climb appears out of nowhere, the trail reasserting its dominance as if the earlier ridge weren't enough. To finish up, you fall 0.3 miles downhill back to your car.
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With GPS for reference after some of the creek crossings, through campsites and at trail junctions, the trail is relatively easy to follow. There are a few service roads that cross the trail near the outset; take care not to let your feet get distracted by them.

Happy trails!

hiking
2 months ago

This was a great Trail I enjoyed the hike.The forest was showing signs of Spring everywhere. it looked like they may have attempted to do a controlled burn on both sides of the trail most of the way. there was alot of burned and scorched forest on both sides of the trail, amazingly the trail itself showed no signs of being burned.

backpacking
2 months ago

Great trail! It is muddy for the first section but besides that it was great. We stayed the night in the shelter after a short hike in (~3.5 miles) and then hiked out the next morning! Good hike for a beginner backpacking trip I have been on several and this was one of the easiest. It was a gradual uphill in and all downhill on the way back. Very nice!

on Skyway Loop Trail

hiking
3 months ago

I hiked this trail yesterday from Adams Gap moving counterclockwise. First - it is not 17.7 miles, but 18.8 miles. I think I have seen someone else mention this. When you are exhausted from hiking this in one day, then finding out you actually aren’t finished, but rather, have one more mile to hike is not good news. Second, your feet are going to get wet. Just go ahead and baptize them early, and you don’t have to worry about it anymore. Yesterday, the creeks were high and the current was stronger than I have seen it because of all the rain Saturday. I spent 20 minutes trying to find a safe place to walk across at Chinnabee Lake area. The waterfalls are gorgeous on the Chinnabee section, and the rock gardens on the Pinhoti are just beautiful - although make for a very slow ascent to Pearly Gates. Skyway section is great exercise because it is rolling hills most of the way with a good uphill run at the end. This trail is rated moderate, but there are definitely hard sections. The trail is well marked except for the section coming down off Pinhoti all the way to Devils Den. It got a little tricky in a few areas coming down after I left Pinhoti, and I was thankful for GPS to show me where the trail was. There is one creek crossing about 2 miles from finish to Adams Gap that is a T where one creek meets another, and it is a bit confusing because of a campsite being there which dissolved the trail. There are markings here, but it took me a minute to find them, and at 5:45 I was pretty nervous about getting lost! All in all, a good, but EXHAUSTING hike! It would be much better and more fun to take in two days with a camping buddy.

hiking
3 months ago

I loved this trail. So many areas where you are hiking along the water. We did the skyway loop in one day going counter clockwise. It was exhilarating and exhausting! My hiking partner is 5 months pregnant and was able to complete it - only becoming tired the last 2 miles of the 18. ( she was already an avid hiker so no worries...). I would like to note that going CCW, we completely lost the trail around mile 13. We bushwhacked for approx. 45 minutes until we backtracked far enough back to finally discover that the trail takes a very sneaky hidden 180* jump across the creek. There are no blazes at this area to tell you to cross. Besides that, the waterfalls and beautiful terrain, I fell in love with it.

Good trail well marked with good water. About half of the trail follows the pinhoti so the blue blazes light your path. When you get off the pinhoti just follow the signs and stay on the well beaten path and you should be fine. The trail passes by the out and back trail to McDill Point. It is worth the extra 1 mike out and back to take a gander. All in all it’s more like eight miles so bring a snack and water. I used most of my water cooking for my son and Myself but I had a sawyer filtration system on hand. There is a plane crash to see on the McDill trail.

backpacking
3 months ago

This is one of my favorite trails. We joined this trail from the north from the Pinhoti trail at Cheaha State park. The skyway trail from Adams Gap to the intersection with the Chinnebee Silent trail has numerous small stream crossings and two "significant stream crossings" . The Chinnebee Silent trail section of this loop has more foot traffic a two waterfalls (Devils Den and Cheaha). You have to make a crossing at the top of Cheaha Falls. Great camp sites, lots of water, rocky and some gradient.

hiking
3 months ago

Awesome trail. Was my first solo trip, started counter clockwise and climb to the top of the mountain the first night after a late start. I didn’t find the stairway to heaven that terribly hard but definitely very rocky on the way up and down. There was a nice overlook camping spot at the top of the the mountain at like mile 4.1 or so (before the pearly gate). Stayed there the night sunset and sunrise was amazing, enough room for a 1 person tent. Rest of the trail on the pinhoti was fairly straight forward, once you get to the Chinnabee silent trail play close close attention to blazes. After hitting cheaha falls is very easy to get lost, ended taking a detour on a car trail (I thought was part of the loop) to CR 385 to rd 646 to lake chinnabee since I didn’t want to turn around.... but was a pretty awesome place. I missed devils den unfortunately but hikers I met said it’s an awesome swimming/ cliff jumping spot. Once back on trail at lake chinnabee you have to cross a decent creek... the Skyway part is not very visible and very hard to see only found it bc of some other hikers tbh. After getting on skyway though it’s a basically a straight shot till you hit pinhoti, those rolling hills will kick your but though. Would be a moderate 2 night hike and an ambition 1 night hike after a late start. You can pick up a map in the way at the turnipseed trail head along the way.

Great unique trail. Has rocks thru out and challenging in spots.

Hiked this yesterday, but only to get to Cheaha Falls which is about 1.5 Miles from Turnip Seed Parking Area.Parking at Turnip seed cross the highway and follow the Silent Trail until it leads to the falls. Great swimming hole for the summer. Pretty area. It was late in the day and we were unsure how far the rest of the trails went or where they led to. I highly recommend picking up a nap from the store at the opening of Cheaha Map.

Hiked this yesterday from the turnipseed trailhead. Great hike. Way more beautiful than I expected.

Only issue was that it was unclear which way the trail went once you got to cheaha falls. There are multiple paths in that area. Chinabee silent trail goes straight across the top of the falls to the other side.

It as my first time to hike this loop. Fortunately, I have a good sense of direction and a serviceable map of the Cheaha Wilderness Area which I printed from the USDA website beforehand. The Cave Creek section of the trail was poorly marked. I never saw a sign near the Trail Head or the Connector Trail. At one point I wasn't sure what trail I was on. Was I still on Cave Creek or had I pushed past it, moving on to the Nubbin Creek or Odum Scout Trail by then? . My map did not reflect what I was seeing and because of no signage, I had no way to verify my position. Stumbling upon a trail intersection is not good when there are no markings telling me what trail was what. All I knew is that if I took the trail that was heading generally west, I would eventually run into the Pinhoti. I never saw any signage for Cave Creek until I came across another trail intersection aprox a mile from the Pinhoti. Once you get to the Pinhoti, everything is gravy. This trail is wonderfully marked with blue blazes and metal tags, a welcome contrast to Cave Creek. Despite Cave Creek challenging my old Boy Scout skills, I had a wonderful time. And the Pinhoti serves up one gorgeous view after another. I can't wait to go back.

hiking
4 months ago

This trip kicked our tail. We went counter clockwise so we could hit the mountain first. Climbing the mountain had tons of rocks so be extremely careful not to twist an ankle. The path down was very similar. Once you make it to Chinnabee Silent Trail near the next railhead it levels out and is incredibly enjoyable for the next 5 miles. trail is 6 miles of rolling hills. You have to cross 3 creeks so be careful to spot the correct trail. The last 3 miles are mostly uphill and we were exhausted. Barely made it due to exhaustion. Having said all this, this is absolutely a trail worth taking. A beautiful view from the top of the mountain, gorgeous waterfalls, rolling hills, canyons, pine thickets, and some killer camping spots. The distance wasn't bad, but the elevation certainly was. Next time I'll make it a 3 day tip and preserve our strength.

hiking
4 months ago

This was my first time to hike this trail. When I walked to the trailhead from the parking lot I took a wrong turn! I turned right and ended up on the Pinhoti headed away from the loop. I hiked a few miles out and back in to the trailhead and decided - what the heck - I came to hike the Cave Creek Trail so I'm going to do it. I proceeded taking the trail south toward three o'clock in the loop - I would say this side of the hike was easy. I was able to move fairly quickly. The scenery changes dramatically on the "back side" - several areas when on the actual Pinhoti required finding the blazes. When I decide to hike this loop again I will dig the backside in on the front stretch. Great views on the backside.

hiking
4 months ago

Great trail. Falls were a great site to see and hear. My fiancé and I hiked it with our dog. The Cheaha 50k happened to be racing through. It was fun cheering on the runners. Only mistake was that we wanted to start at Chinnabee Lake. It’s closed until March 1. Fun one though.

backpacking
4 months ago

Backpacked in/out from 281 last weekend with my husband, 11-year-old daughter, and our dog. Great family hike -- not too rigorous with interesting geology, plant life, and water falls! The first section of the trail from 281 to Cheaha Falls is a bit busy with lots of folks just hiking in to the view the main falls, but traffic diminishes considerably after you cross the creek. We ended up with a sweet little camp spot down in the valley off the left-hand side of the trail in the area known as Devil's Den.

Nice hike. 2nd half more rocky and more ascents. Worth it to head off 1/4 mike trail to Mcdill overlook on the back half.

hiking
4 months ago

My wife and I are wanting to get into hiking. Got this app and found this trail and read the reviews. The trail is rated easy but as beginners we found it to be challenging. The trail itself is well marked and pretty well traveled. However, it was very very steep in certain places. Guess we are really out of shape. LOL! Although it is short the steepness should make it moderate. The view at the top though was well worth the hike. Cool waterfall and scenic views! We will definitely hike it again.

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