Nason Ridge Trail

HARD 2 reviews
#94 of 137 trails in

Nason Ridge Trail is a 22.1 mile lightly trafficked point-to-point trail located near Leavenworth, Washington that features a great forest setting. The trail is only recommended for very experienced adventurers offers a number of activity options. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.

DISTANCE
22.1 miles
ELEVATION GAIN
7867 feet
ROUTE TYPE
Point to Point

dogs on leash

backpacking

hiking

mountain biking

trail running

forest

views

Directions from Lake Wenatchee: Take State Route 207 south to the Nason Creek Campground. Cautionary note: if you plan on doing the entire trail (starting from the trailhead), there is an intersection with multiple logging roads (not trails) at approximately 2.5 miles into the hike. While there is a sign pointing you back in the direction of the trailhead, no marker exists to point the way to continue along Nason Ridge trail. From the middle of the intersection, you can see no less than five different options. Turn right (north) to the steepest of the roads; it returns to a trail approximately half a mile up and there is another sign pointing you in the direction of the trail. No running water to speak of during the first six miles of the trek.

hiking
4 months ago

Trail is marked closed to the public 0.5 miles in from trailhead at private property line. Only sampled this portion of the trail.

backpacking
4 months ago

Cautionary note: if you plan on doing the entire trail (starting from the trailhead), there is an intersection with multiple logging roads (not trails) at approximately 2.5 miles into the hike. While there is a sign pointing you back in the direction of the trailhead, no marker exists to point the way to continue along Nason Ridge trail. From the middle of the intersection, you can see no less than five different options. Turn right (north) to the steepest of the roads; it returns to a trail approximately half a mile up and there is another sign pointing you in the direction of the trail. No running water to speak of during the first six miles of the trek.