Kendall Katwalk Trail

HARD 160 reviews

Kendall Katwalk Trail is a 14.5 mile moderately trafficked out and back trail located near Snoqualmie Pass, Washington that features a lake and is rated as difficult. The trail offers a number of activity options and is best used from June until September. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.

DISTANCE
14.5 miles
ELEVATION GAIN
3202 feet
ROUTE TYPE
Out & Back

dogs on leash

birding

hiking

nature trips

snowshoeing

trail running

walking

horseback riding

forest

lake

views

wild flowers

wildlife

bugs

snow

Hike along the Pacific crest trail from I-90 to reach the Kendall katwalk, a rock path blasted out of the cliff face.

1 month ago

I love it when I am able to do a new hike with gorgeous weather along with Gorgeous views. I couldn't believe I haven't hiked this one before, now I can add this one to be a duplicate, because I'm sure I will like this one again. great day great hike

hiking
1 month ago

Hiked Sat 10/28. Conditions were very good, 2 or 3 water crossings at the 1/3 portion of the trail - if you have hiking shoes you'll get through dry footed. Some snow (ankle deep?) at 2/3 of the way. We had hiking boots and a trekking pole each and it was sufficient. Great views along the way. It is a little disappointing that the trail has no climax point, but definitely worth the effort.

Hiked this incredible trail Tues Oct 24! Made it all the way to the Katwalk... Microspikes may be necessary, as snow became about knee dip 5 miles in! Water crossings are deep and intense...complete waterproof gear, especially shoes would be worth it. Totally worth it for the blue sky, snow, and fall colors...it was phenomenal scenery...with Rainier as the icing to our cake. The hike is long, but moderately challenging vs alltrails rating as difficult. Recommend on a clear fall day.

hiking
1 month ago

Hiked this mid-week. Turned around at the 5.2 mile mark, and didn't make it all the way to the Katwalk. No snow at all until the 5-mile mark, but there was some after that. Weather was really nice with outstanding views of Rainier. The water crossings were no joke - very full!

hiking
1 month ago

Great hike. It seemed like it should be moderate level hike in the summertime rather than "hard". but it was overall gorgeous! I enjoyed it on my day off and would 100% recommend to a friend. be careful with kids-there are steep cliffs.

hiking
1 month ago

Nice sunny views of red mountain, and guye peak. the snow definitely added much beauty.

I started early, around 9. trail was icy and boot packed snow. quite slippery at times. muddy and slushy in the warm afternoon.

it is a beautiful trail but it also felt kind of long, and features mostly the same views until the very end when you crest the ridge and get to see the other side, near the katwalk.

not exactly exciting since the trail is quite wide and heavily trafficked, but it is surely a beautiful spot in the Snoqualmie hood... way prettier than your usual i90 hikes and not as grueling either.

2 months ago

Incredibly mucky, slushy, snowy and a little icy. Those views made it worthwhile as it may have been my last chance at it for the year.

2 months ago

Fantastic hike. Make sure to wear study boots as there are many rocks to climb over.

2 months ago

Last 1.5 miles is all snow! About 4-6 inches. Bring gloves. Really foggy up top.

2 months ago

This is definitely the time to go. Trail is clear. Bring layers, it can get pretty cold and windy on the katwalk.

hiking
2 months ago

This trail is part of the famous PCT , it was great hike and fantastic view . I have enjoyed the trail and I am considering doing it again.

3 months ago

Most of the hike is through the woods but the few views you get are worth the whole hike. Enjoyed hiking it

hiking
3 months ago

If you are bringing a dog you might want to bring hiking booties for them. The loose ruble rocks the last 3 miles are sharp.

You do hear noise from I-90 the first 2-3 miles.

The katwalk is not as steep or impressive as expected.

It is about 6 miles from the parking lot to the catwalk.

A forest service pass or an interagency national park pass is required. They do not accept the discover pass.

hiking
3 months ago

Guess I'll go for the minority opinion here - it's crowded, most of the trail has highway noise, & about 2/3rds of it is viewless woods... and for such a long trail, that kinda stinks. (Also, it's closer to 12 miles round-trip and 2600 ft gain to the "katwalk" itself; maybe 14.5 miles if you're going to the lakes).

Of course the mountain views are neat once you get there, but not uniquely or spectacularly so. It is an impressive engineering feat for sure. One of the best trails in the Snoqualmie Pass area? Sure. One of the best in Washington? It wouldn't rate for me.

There was a nice flowing stream about 1/3 or 1/2 way in where you can filter water from. Also, at around the last 1/3 of the hike you're on exposed rocky slopes and if it's hot like it has been this summer, this section is like an OVEN in the afternoon, despite being relatively higher up. Even peeps much fitter than me looked beaten down and were asking how far from the top they were.

hiking
3 months ago

If you are a fit individual, this isn't too much more than a long (beautiful) walk in the woods. The "hard" rating must be due to the length only. The ascent/descent are very gradual making the elevation gain feel minimal. If you are up for a challenge, I HIGHLY suggest taking the unmarked trail (ascending) to Kendall Peak for 360 degree views of surrounding mountains. The summit trail can be found on the right-hand side a little after completing the last/small switchback at about 5248'.

If it's mid-to-late summer, or if you like cold water, bring something to swim in as the trail terminates at alpine lakes!

hiking
3 months ago

Beautiful trail with very little difficulty

trail running
4 months ago

This trail is fantastic and very good for trail running. It gets a bit rocky at times, but the views are fantastic. The length makes the elevation gain really gradual, so it's not a very difficult trek. I recommend going on a weekday, if you want to avoid the big crowds of people. I went on a Wednesday (August 2nd) and I felt like I had the trail all to myself. I love this trail and will definitely come back and do it again!

4 months ago

As only one very small part of the Pacific Crest trail, Kendall Katwalk trail is an astounding, beautiful, and breathtaking journey across just about every natural "feature" one could want in a trail excursion. And while the destination (the "Katwalk") is spectacular, the journey to it is rife with astounding views. Today's visit (7/29/17) was nearly incomparable, my only caveat being that I'd wished to not suffer so much the day after, my feet, knees and lower back all complaining. But worth the price? Yes - FAR worth it.

Arriving at the trail at 8:45, the parking lot was full; get there early, and have a Northwest forest pass, or pay a fee. Fortunately, an adjacent lot just north provided a single spot that I was able to squeeze into. It's a short walk to the trailhead, equipped as most better ones are, with restrooms and an information board. The Forest Service does an incredible job of maintenance on these trails!!

Having traversed the trail, it's easy to "dissect" it into three distinctive sections, across a distance of just over seven miles (one-way), ascending 3,833 feet. The first 3.5 miles are most pleasant, drawing the hiker through thick forest canopy, mostly sheltered from the sun, on a nice gradual climb. This took me two hours. At 3.6 miles, the trail "splits", and can be deceiving; as you exit the woods and come out into the open, you can climb some rocks in front of you, and continue on, or go to the right, which remains a nice dirt path. GO RIGHT - which is the correct path to the Katwalk.

Shortly after the split, you again enter the woods into what I refer to as the "second section", also covered in canopy. Here, you will encounter steeper, smooth switchbacks that curve their way through the forest. The trail itself is relatively smooth, though there are several outcroppings of roots and rocks along the way. The most interesting part of this area is being able to look up at the trail and see people well above you on the switchbacks, knowing that you have to make it up there, too! After two miles of uphill climb, you break out into the open, onto a massive rock bed.

On this particular day, with bright sun in the sky, I saw some people up ahead looking towards the hill. There, perched atop a rock about twenty feet above, was a large marmot, casually watching the hikers below. It was my first "encounter" of one of these animals, just another discovery in a series of adventures. More importantly, I was in the third and final section, having only about 1.5 miles to go.

But here, the real magic begins. Turning to look towards the southeast, the horizon was graced with the massive beauty of a snow-covered Mount Rainier! What a lovely surprise, and an incredible backdrop for photographs. It was both an unexpected and wonderful delight, obviously a highlight of the trail, as many folks were stopped in this area, looking beyond.

With interstate 90 appearing as a narrow ribbon in the valley below, the height of the climb became obvious! After a short break, and a snack, I trudged forward, as the path led around open curves, and beautiful vistas of the valley and ridges that surrounded the path. Wildflowers abounded, in all shades.

There is a point where the path no longer parallels the valley, but turns and takes you to the other side of the mountain, onto new ridges and overlooks. There are a number of places to stop and take photos, with sharp, stony ridges and even remnants of snow, lingering here late in July. It seemed like I would never reach the Katwalk, though I was told by several hikers that I was "getting close".

A few more twists, turns, a flattening of the trail, some shaded spots, and there it was! The Katwalk, so named because of the sheer drop on one side, and a cut rock face to the other, is a short (40-50 feet) expanse. Fear not, however; it's about eight to nine feet wide, which exits onto more pathway that leads you farther into the wilderness, and as I'm told, to some alpine lakes beyond.

But here my journey ended, a four hour trek, as I stopped to rest and have lunch. As I sat and pulled out my sandwich, birds took a sudden interest; these are the infamous "Grey Jays", or more appropriate "camp robbers", known for their tendency to readily walk off with edible items whenever they surround a camp site.

As I sat and ate, I pulled bits of bread from my sandwich, and tossed them away, with the birds swooping down on them. I then held a piece in my fingers to see what would happen; one of the birds immediately flew onto my hand, grabbed the food, sat for a few seconds, and then flew away. What a great experience!!

The trek back in the warmer mid afternoon sun took two hours and fifty minutes, with the total trek adding up to nearly 7.5 hours. Of all the trails I've encountered to date, the majority having waterfall or lake destinations, this one was the longest (14.5 miles round trip), offered the best changes in terrain, and had the most outstanding vista views by

hiking
4 months ago

This hike provides you with series of breathtaking panoramic views both on the way and on the katwalk. The ascent is pleasantly punctuated with varied terrain, and sections of just enough flat sections for it not to get too strenuous to enjoy the wonderful panorama.

hiking
4 months ago

Great trail. Nice gradual switchbacks. The views of Rainier and the other peaks were great. There were several areas with snow drifts over the trail in the high alpine but they were easily manageable going slow and following the path people had already carved out. Good hiking boots are a must as there are several areas of large rock gardens on the trail.

Load More