Lone Star Hiking Trail and Little Lake Creek Trail

MODERATE 52 reviews

Lone Star Hiking Trail and Little Lake Creek Trail is a 14 mile lightly trafficked loop trail located near Richards, Texas that features a lake and is rated as moderate. The trail offers a number of activity options and is best used from March until October. Dogs are also able to use this trail.

DISTANCE
14.0 miles
ELEVATION GAIN
721 feet
ROUTE TYPE
Loop

dog friendly

birding

camping

hiking

nature trips

trail running

walking

forest

lake

river

views

wild flowers

wildlife

bridge out

bugs

muddy

The Lone Star Hiking Trail is continuously marked with aluminum tree blazes and mile markers. It is well-maintained by several clubs, including the Houston Sierra Club and LSHT Club. Currently, the only major trail obstacle is the downed bridge over the East Fork of the San Jacinto River in the Magnolia Section (the river here can be crossed on a fallen log or by fording; it is about thigh deep and slow-flowing normally). There are ten sections of trail broken up by road crossings where there are usually free trailhead parking areas. The trail is popular among thru-hikers, who seek to hike the entire length in one continuous trek. There are several places to resupply, the most popular being Huntsville State Park about mid-way along the route. The trail is mostly flat to gently rolling; it can be muddy after heavy rains, but only in limited sections. Most of the tread is over sandy soil and stay dry. The forest is very diverse, a mix of pine and hardwood. Creeks are common, most of which are seasonal but some of which are larger and offer good wildlife sighting opportunities. The trail is a hidden jewel in East Texas, the only long distance trail in the state and a treasure of hiking adventures for any age or experience level. It is best hiked in the fall, winter and spring, as summers tend to be hot, muggy and buggy.

hiking
18 days ago

hiking
26 days ago

This was my first real hike, as I normally jog on paved trails. If you’re a novice hiker like myself, I’ve listed some of my recommendations/general observations below. To give you an idea of my fitness level, on average, I jog 10-15 miles / week.
1) Wear pants and long sleeves. There were several spots where the brush was shoulder-high with a very narrow trail. My pant legs and sleeves were snagged by thorns dozens of times. The downside to pants & long sleeves, is the heat and humidity… and good lord was it humid, I started at 8am.
2) Bring a walking stick. It doesn’t have to be some official hiking pole. I literally unscrewed the handle to a push broom in my garage before I left in the morning. Early on, the primary role of the “stick” was to knock away spider webs covering the trails. Later in the hike, it did come in handy for stabilization purposes traversing some creeks or steeper climbs, particularly as I became more fatigued. If you hike early, you’ll likely be the one clearing all the spider webs…
3) Backup socks. This may be a non-issue for many folks, but I wore some brand new hiking boots with some of those “wicking” socks. They didn’t like each other and my feet were being rubbed raw after only a few miles. I brought a backup pair of normal cotton socks and they fared much better.
4) I sprayed some “OFF” on, as I assumed the mosquitos were going to be pretty bad. Either the OFF worked great or there just weren’t many mosquitos to contend with
5) Water/Drinks. I brought/wore a 1.5 Liter Camelbak backpack and carried a 20 oz bottle of Vitamin Water to drink from first. My Camelback was nearly empty when I finished the trail. Be sure to leave “post-hike” water or drinks in your vehicle.
6) I brought some cliff bars and beef jerky to eat. I didn’t stop for a formal lunch or anything like that.
7) Maps & Cell Service. I printed and brought a couple maps, but they disintegrated in my pocket from sweat. However, I did download the maps to my phone. The cell service was spotty, certainly not reliable if you’re trying to access the internet (map). I did need the map a few times just to be sure I wasn’t making a wrong turn at the few junctions where a wrong turn is possible. Otherwise, the trail markers worked great. I did bring a cell phone backup battery, just in case. The GPS did seem to work OK.
8) Overall, it was very enjoyable.

1 month ago

hiking
2 months ago

2 months ago

3 months ago

hiking
3 months ago

Only hiked the first loop, it was a fairly easy hike. No spectacular view points, but a nice way to enjoy the outdoors on a sunny March day. There were a couple muddy spots and very small water crossings, but nothing challenging.

backpacking
3 months ago

I took my Boy Scout Troop on a 24 mile, two night hike from Winter's Bayou to Iron Ore trailheads. We hiked in March and the trail was muddy, but enjoyable. There are many water crossings that have missing or damaged bridges that made for interesting crossing - but we made it across.

hiking
4 months ago

Long hike, but relatively flat and easy. No exciting views, but lovely surroundings. Quick and simple way to get into the outdoors and forget that you are near any roads (except for when you have to cross them)!

4 months ago

It was a short jaunt during February (winter time) with the toddler, but I am curious to explore it some more! I notice some things starting to bloom and some past forest fire indications, but green trees hover above.

4 months ago

4 months ago

5 months ago

hiking
7 months ago

it was nice. we found a good spot for yoga and lunch

hiking
7 months ago

It I okay for a Texas trail. Lots of thorns on the trail. Long pants are necessary some sections needs better maintenance.

hiking
8 months ago

hiking
8 months ago

9 months ago

hiking
9 months ago

It was beautiful!

9 months ago