Gold Lake SnoPark to Bechtel Shelter via Pengra Pass

MODERATE 3 reviews

Gold Lake SnoPark to Bechtel Shelter via Pengra Pass is a 4.5 mile moderately trafficked out and back trail located near Crescent, Oregon that features a great forest setting and is rated as moderate. The trail is primarily used for camping, cross country skiing, and snowshoeing and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail.

DISTANCE
4.5 miles
ELEVATION GAIN
341 feet
ROUTE TYPE
Out & Back

dog friendly

kid friendly

camping

cross country skiing

snowshoeing

forest

views

snow

hiking
10 months ago

Went on a clear day with probably 18" of snow pack along much of the trail, didn't need snowshoes but they wouldn't have hurt to take along. Took a detour on accident down to the train tracks (sharp right off the trail just before the slight right that goes to the shelter) and had a serendipitous train sighting which was enjoyable. Tons of railroad spikes laying around by the tracks that might make for a welcome souvenir. Gradual grade most of the way to the shelter which is a short side path off of the main trail. Well stocked with wood and we got a fire roaring quickly, had a couple Worthy beers and enjoyed the afternoon before making it back just in time to lose daylight. A welcome day trip that I'll make again.

snowshoeing
Thursday, November 23, 2017

I snowshoed to Bechtel shelter in mid November after a good weeklong snowfall.
The whole route is on forest roads (Abernathy/Pengra pass road): NF5899 for the first mile and then NF511 for the last mile to the shelter.
I had to blaze the snowshoe trail in virgin deep (2+ feet) and powdery snow. That made for a pretty long slog and a couple undignified falls. If the trail is already packed by others this should be a easy to moderate snowshoe route; the elevation gain is around 300ft and makes for a relatively flat-ish route. The last half-mile to the shelter is a bit steeper than the rest.
The shelter is a a couple hundred feet steep drop below the road and steep (I put on my heel lifts when climbing back up).
When I got there, the shelter was well kept and stocked with firewood. A wood stove, wooden table, and benches form the ground floor room. A loft provides sleeping quarters for a few backpackers.
There are no views to speak of on this trail (other than, of course, the wonderful winter scenery on a bright sunny day).
Parking at the Gold Lake Sno-Park is convenient (don't forget you Sno-Park pass in season) and provides restrooms plus the Gold Lake SnoPark shelter and warming center (fully enclosed structure).

snowshoeing
Saturday, November 18, 2017