Stanton Mountain is a 7.5 mile moderately trafficked out and back trail located near Whitefish, Montana that features a lake and is rated as difficult. The trail is primarily used for hiking, nature trips, and bird watching and is best used from July until October.

Length7.5 miElevation gain4,484 ftRoute typeOut & back
HikingNature tripsBird watchingForestLakeViewsFee
Description
Waypoints (0)
Getting There

https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/statusupdate.htm. Glacier National Park charges a fee to enter. Fees are per vehicle or per motorcycle, with different rates in the Winter. If you are entering on foot, horse, or bike the fee is per person. You can also purchase a park-specific annual pass. Winter rates are in place 11/1-4/30. Stanton Mountain stands at the head of Lake McDonald. Its south facing slope melts out earlier than other peaks in Glacier National Park making it a great candidate for an early season summit.

To climb Stanton Mountain, begin at the Howe Ridge Trail on the Northwest shore of Lake McDonald.

Weather
UV Index
Daylight
Reviews (7)
Photos (22)
Activities (6)
Completed (25)
View user's profile page
Brian Elkins
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarDecember 3, 2020
HikingBlowdownGreat!No shadeOff trailSnow

Difficult this time of year with snow, but if you're in it to snowshoe/climb, this one is incredibly rewarding. The weather was perfect, wind 5-10mph, great temps, warming up the higher you go (6000ft+ upper 40's). Bring more water than normal. The hike starts off fairly easy, but after 2.5 miles in and the turn off-trail into the deadfall, it reminds you this is a mountain and the grade dramatically increases and your snowshoeing becomes climbing. As of yesterday, the avalanche forecast was clear for the area. But, with any backcountry outing —always read the snow and check the forecast; https://flatheadavalanche.org/weather-station-map# I did see signs of two thin slab slides that broke along the South-Western side, higher temps, and direct sun. The views are great, but I chose to cut the climb short 0.2miles from the summit because of the slides near the route. The descent is tough on snowshoes —could have skied partially down. Great workout.

View Brian's activity
View user's profile page
simon roston
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 27, 2020
Hiking
View simon's activity
View user's profile page
Travis Shipley
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarJuly 27, 2020

The view is great, but I think there are other hikes in the park with a bigger reward for the same or less effort put in. The descent is brutal on the knees and feet. FYI, finding the trail off the marked trail takes a little work as there is alot of downed trees from the previous burn. Trekking poles are highly recommended.

View user's profile page
Abigail Roston
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarJuly 5, 2020
HikingBugsOff trailRockyScramble

7/4/20 this is such a fun climb. The hike starts off pretty mellow up the Trout Lake trail and then the off trail work begins. Although it’s a little hard to find and keep the trail on the way to the summit, it’s totally manageable. We mostly relied on our intuition to make it to the top through the down trees and gorgeous meadows. The trail is steep with a couple of false summits but not too sunny or hot. The views are exceptional and well deserved after the climb up!

View user's profile page
Will Crawford
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarJuly 4, 2020
HikingOff trailOver grownRockyScramble
First to Review

Difficult but incredibly rewarding hike (climb?). From the Trout Lake trailhead, head up the trail to 5120 feet where you’ll encounter a sign on the left hand side of the trail indicating a junction. From there, proceed off the trail to the right (East). It will look wrong, as it’s just overgrown thickets and downed trees for about half a mile with no visible trail. If there is a real trail beyond this point, we could not find it. Trust your navigational instincts (or GPS) and bushwhack for about 15-20 minutes trying to make your way up the ridge towards Stanton Mountain. Once you clear the overgrown/blowdown area, the terrain changes to short grass and the going is much easier, albeit steeper. There is visible “trail” in patches through this section, but don’t waste time trying to follow it. Simply head up the ridge through the path of least resistance. Once you reach the first false summit, the trail changes to scree and scrambling is required, but the route to the top is much more clear and a consistent trail can be followed. The trail is steep and loose but never too exposed. The views at the top are incredible! Well worth the side-country effort.

View user's profile page
Gillian King
Gray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarGray StarSeptember 25, 2020
Hiking
View user's profile page
Leah Gunnink
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarJune 23, 2018
Hiking
View Leah's activity