Adventure Hiking Trail

HARD 49 reviews

Adventure Hiking Trail is a 22.4 mile moderately trafficked loop trail located near Corydon, Indiana that features a river and is only recommended for very experienced adventurers. The trail is primarily used for hiking and backpacking and is accessible year-round.

22.4 miles 4438 feet Loop

backpacking

hiking

forest

river

views

wildlife

8 days ago

hiking
8 days ago

backpacking
12 days ago

I have to say this trail was the most physically demanding yet gratifying trail I have done to date. It will really test you beyond what you think you are capable of. At one point, on day three, I almost gave up. I pushed through my own personal wall and kept going. The Ohio River Shelter and Indian Creek Shelter areas are the prettiest views southern Indiana can offer. Water Caches at Pioneer Picnic, Cold Friday Road, and Old Forest Road seemed to be the most effective. I would recommend this trail to anyone who wants beauty and a challenge

backpacking
17 days ago

What an amazing and challenging trail. This was the best marked trail that I have hiked in 2 1/2 years. The shelters were awesome. Be careful with the cheap version of the map, it is missing a good part of the trail. This is going to be one of my training courses as i build up for hiking the Appalachian trail southbound July 2018. I loved this trail, and the shelters make it that much better. Bring plenty of water there is not a bunch of water sources. Look for the many locations of natural spring water. Cold and refreshing. Make sure you bring food for 3 days, just in case you realized its not as easy as you might think. I will be doing this trail many times this summer and fall. Thanks O Bannon Woods for a great adventure!! Joel L. (The Hiking Source) on facebook.

backpacking
1 month ago

Overall a very decent trail for a challenging
Overnight hike. I made the drive down from Michigan after work on a Friday, it was quite the drive (5+ hours through Indiana backcountry). I made it too the Old Barn Shelter where I was greeted by no one around 1130pm. The shelter itself shelters your from the elements and offers a fire pit under the shelter. It made for a chilly night with a only 3 walls and an open entrance, however I'll take a 45 degree night in February anytime! After an early
Morning I drove through O'Bannon Woods to take in some sights and cached three liters of water on Cold Friday Road in between the Homestead and OHio River shelter (most reviews recommended it and I wasn't taking any chances). I parked on SR-462 near the entrance of O'Bannon woods. The trail itself on day one (13+ miles) featured plenty of ups and downs and all arounds the ravines and valleys, slowly making your way towards the Ohio River. I crossed over several dried up creek beds that would be quite the sight during a heavy spring runoff. I chugged along and heard the unpleasant moans and groans of heavy machinery labor in the distance. Shortly thereafter signs posted detoured me to a fireplace (bushwhacked up a hill) which ran about a mile until a clearing with heavy machinery that is used for a logging operation. The trail met back up with the AHT and soon I traced the Indian creek shelter which looked inviting and the view down to the Indian creek was awesome. After some snaking through ravines I made it to a primitive shelter (more or less an emergency stop) and another mile later to homestead shelter where I broke for lunch. Crossing Cold Friday Road and refilling my water I was in for quite the uphill, however there was glimpses of the Ohio River through the February woods. After some laboring again ( you guessed it ravines) I made it to the Ohio River Shelter which is the prize of the whole AHT. The shelter was one of the nicest I've seen. I was thrilled, yet disappointed when I realized there was no one else at the shelter, allowing me
To stake my claim to a nice corner within the shelter. A few hours of slacking around, gathering wood, and hoping the rain would hold off two guys showed up (the first people I had seen since leaving on Friday evening). The rain held off aside from a sprinkle or two and it make for a peaceful night watching the barges steam up and down the river from the high bluff. The sun set per usual on a mid-February night (6pm) which made for an early bedtime, however the wind really picked up. I was awoken from my slumber at 1am by the door being swung open by a heinous gust of wind that was straight from the evil dead. I stumbled to my feet worried the deadites would soon follow. I woke up several times from that moment as it was unsettling yet fascinating to hear the creeks and groans of the wind meeting the log cabin. I woke up around 7 and hurried to rush out of camp to make it back to my car in a reasonable time, getting out around 745a as the wind was subsiding however the drizzle began, a mist leading into a light rain for an hour or so making the trip down the bluff and towards the picnic shelter a little more interesting. After making
Past the picnic shelter it became an uphill gain for a distance, until reaching the campground junction in which I intended to stop for water, but passed on it as I was doing pretty well I'm the 50-60 degree weather since my fill-up the day prior. The AHT snakes around the campground and a short mile later you are at the Old Iron Bridge that crosses the Blue River (more so a green river). The trail up to this point was marked extremely well, markers every 150-200 feet or on trees, however from the Old Iron Bridge to The Rendezvous point becomes a more rugged, less markers, and more trash. The trail follows the Blue River for a distance then you make a strenuous uphill trek to reach the Hog Barn Shelter. After the Hog Barn there's some
More uphill followed by a junction in which you can continue north to the Old Barn Shelter or head South (East). I made it back to my car right around noon. Thus making my total trip of 23ish miles in 28 hours ( 11+ hours of hiking time). I usually average 2.5-3 miles an hour, the uphill and elevation gain defiantly added some time to this trip.

Overall, an extremely pleasant and challenging trail that is perfect for an overnight. It would be quite the challenge to complete in one day given the toil on your knees. The lack of water on this trail wasn't as concerning as I thought it would be. If you're in a pinch you could filter from the Indian River or Ohio River (no clear way to get there, but manageable) or the blue River. All three rivers looked pretty cloudy, so maybe sticking to drop points would be better. In the whole trip, I saw 6 people, which really surprised me. This is a wonderful trail that is a mere 30 minutes from Louisville and a short distance from Evansville and Indianapolis. If more trails like th

backpacking
1 month ago

Visited In February of 2017. It was an amazing 60+degree day with sunshine. Only had a few hours of hiking so just went from The Pioneer Shelter to first Cabin over looking the Ohio River. (1.3miles one way) This section is great for those wanting a short decent uphill hike with a view!

1 month ago

backpacking
1 month ago

1 month ago

This trail is much longer than I initially thought. I must urge anyone who attempts it to bring a water filter and at least two days of food, extra if possible.
As of January 27, three parts of the trail are closed due to logging. The fire trails used to reroute hikers are poorly marked, and shorten the trail. I would recommend anyone interested in hiking this trail to wait at least a couple weeks, and to check with the park rangers beforehand. Overall the trail was great, well marked (aside from parts which were damaged due to logging), and had plenty of pleasant scenery.

backpacking
2 months ago

Bottom line: IMO, this is the best backpacking trail in Indiana. I've hiked the Knobstone, Techumseh, and many other trails and this one is my favorite.
THE GOOD: This is easily the best marked trail I've hiked in Indiana. Blazes are prolific, easy to find, distinct, and reflective so the trail is easy to follow at night. The trail itself is clear of underbrush and well constructed. We hiked it in January and the lack of foliage gave us good views of the surrounding hills, plus the views of the Ohio River and Indian Creek were just outstanding. The shelters were another nice surprise. Stay at the Ohio river shelter for a nice view of the mighty Ohio River (and the eyesore mining operation on the other bank), or better yet, the Indian Creek shelter for an even better view of Indian Creek far below (and no sounds of heavy industry). Water was also not at all difficult for us to obtain. There is very little trash on the trail, and zero horse marks or droppings.
THE BAD: With the exception of the above mentioned shelters, the other shelters are a bit "meh". The South-Eastern segment of the trail looks like it has undergone timber harvest sometime in the last decade. Large piles of decaying treetops. It's easily noticeable and a bit of an eyesore, but the park did a fine job of reestablishing the trail.
THE UGLY: At the time of this writing (JAN2017) the eastern portion of the trail has been completely demolished by logging activity. We tried to find the reroute, failed, then tried and failed to follow the trail through the area being logged. Finding that impossible, we spent an hour picking our way through muddy logging roads and felled trees until we finally got close enough to the trail that we were able to bushwack our way back onto it. Write your state Governor and representatives and urge them to protect our trails from logging activity. Logging is necessary for forest management, but it can be done without wrecking popular recreational trails (steps down from soapbox).

backpacking
3 months ago

backpacking
4 months ago

This trail will kick your ass. Make sure to cache water and check-in with Ranger Bob before going out. The tail is well marked, and camp sites have shelters and fire rings. Was only able to complete half of the trail, but plan to return in the spring. If your looking for a trail to condition on, this one will not disappointment you. (thanks to Jason and his crew for maintaining the trail).

backpacking
4 months ago

This trail will kick your ass! That said, it's an extremely satisfying backpacking accomplishment . I recommend hiking sections at a time and carrying/caching as much water as possible since there aren't any natural sources to draw from. The AHT is well marked and maintained by the DNR and volunteers (thank you mountain biker Jason and friends). The log cabin shelters are quite unique and equipped with fire rings, but the terrain is rugged and challenging to get to them. Visit the ranger station and listen/follow their all their expert advice! A special shout out to Ranger Bob who advised and prepared us well!

backpacking
4 months ago

Bring tons water!!!! And stash water and the drop points!!! There is no water anywhere on the hole trail!!! Well marked too, oh and bring water!!

mountain biking
4 months ago

Update as of Oct 29th
I've personally cut 50+trees off the trail and a group of us have cleared the tall grass in sections with weedeaters as well the briars. We'll be putting more carsonite signs up to aid with the directions. For those that are use to the overgrown, trees down everywhere trail, you will be very pleased with our groups dedication to getting the trail in shape.

hiking
4 months ago

5 months ago

hiking
5 months ago

Nice trail. As mentioned by others the trail is overgrown in some area and the marking could be improved but all in all the trail is great. Shows you parts of Indiana that you would have never thought were out there.
If you see any mountain bikers you might want to thank them as they are the only group that maintained an the trails in the area. They cut the trees out, clear the briars, and do as much as they can to keep this trail open to all users.

hiking
5 months ago

Myself and two friends hiked this in one day 8a.m. to 6p.m. the trail was fun and tested us the whole hike. Some parts where poor marked and other parts had super tall grass but all and all it was a blast. can't wait to do it again.

hiking
10 months ago

Completed this 23 mile loop trail in 2.5 days. We are a group of 40-something novice backpackers. It was the first trip for the other 3 woman and only my second backpacking adventure. We started at 462 and old forest road and travelled counterclockwise. Despite other reviewers, I would say this trail is marked very well. Just pay attention for the green/white blazes. It is easy to get on a horse trail or a side trail but you will quickly correct when you don't see a blaze. In the area with recent logging south of the Indian creek shelter- it is a little trickier sometimes to find the trail, but we novices did just fine. ( look for the pink ribbons) The trail is tough, carrying all that water is hard- our pace was about 40 min/mile including breaks. I was pleasantly surprised at the quality of campsites. You can camp anywhere but you won't find too many flat spots other than the areas with shelters. The Ohio River Shelter is awesome. Picnic tables, fire rings and a large cabin with a door. There is a trail register there. Very good place to sleep during the thunderstorm. We stayed the second night at Indian Creek shelter. Smaller but still with picnic tables and fire ring and plenty of wood. The Homestead shelter is in a big grassy area and I would be afraid of ticks there. The trail is at times overgrown and sometimes mucky, but that adds to the fun. Many beautiful sites to see. I could get some cell service when on top of the bluffs. There was a severe thunderstorm on May 7th. Lots of blowdowns. The worst area is the 2 mile section between Old Forest Road and 462. Several nearly impassable areas. I hope they can clear it out soon. We had to take our backpacks off and crawl through the downed trunks. I can't wait to do it again but I'm going to carry a lighter pack!