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Jennie, Twin Peaks, Ranger, Seville and Weaver Loop

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Jennie Lakes Wilderness

Jennie, Twin Peaks, Ranger, Seville and Weaver Loop is a 30.3 mile lightly trafficked loop trail located near Sequoia National Park, California that features a lake and is rated as difficult. The trail offers a number of activity options and is best used from June until November.

Length 30.3 mi Elevation gain 6,722 ft Route type Loop
Backpacking Camping Fishing Hiking Bird watching Running Forest Lake Views Waterfall Wild flowers Wildlife Bugs Rocky No dogs
Description
Waypoints (0)

See the park page for up to date fire information: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/sequoia/recarea/?recid=79914 This is a back country loop that begins and ends at the Jennie/Weaver Lake trail head near Big Meadows Sequoia National Forest. The Route crosses the Boundary line Between Jennie Lakes Wilderness and Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks at JO Pass on the southern part of the loop, and at the pass west of Sugarloaf Creek on Belle Canyon trail on the north side of the loop. The route covers 7 different high country lakes with good fishing. Suggested that hikers be at least moderately experienced backpackers. If planning to stay on the Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park side of the boundary line, an overnight wilderness permit is required. A fire permit is needed in the Jennie Lakes wilderness for an open campfire or propane stoves (free online).

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Reviews (18)
Photos (8)
Recordings (18)
Completed (18)
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JORDAN KOHN
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HikingBugsGreat!

Spent three nights out here, following the route as suggested with first night @ Jennie Lake, followed by Seville Lake, and finishing with Weaver Lake. Relatively few people on the trails, particularly beyond Jennie Lake. Stunning views throughout. Silliman pass was probably the most challenging section, but very rewarding! DEET is recommended, particularly at Seville Lake. Plenty of streams from which to filter water. Spotted a momma bear with two cubs about 100 ft from the Silliman Pass South Trail, so bear canisters recommended.

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Ami McKenna
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HikingBugsRocky

Our 4th of July was spent in the wilderness. Wow! It was perfect. 5 days. 6 lakes. Permits were easy to get online. Trails were empty. Weather was perfect. The only downfall, not enough wildlife and a few too many mosquitos. We started in Jennie Lakes Wilderness. 1st night was spent at Jennie Lakes. 2nd day was spent hiking over Silliman Pass, 10,200 ft elevation, to Ranger Lake. Ranger lake was pretty, but no fish. From Ranger Lake we detoured to Lost Lake and ended at Seville Lake for our 3rd night. Mosquitos were pretty bad here. Both of these lakes were beautiful with plenty of trout though. From Seville Lake we hiked back to Rowell Meadow, and found a decent campsite on the Boulder Creek. Our 5th day was spent trekking to Weaver Lake for breakfast and back to the car. Overall, it was a little over 30 miles in 5 days. Being from Pismo Beach area, the altitude kind of kicked our butts. It was so worth it though. It made for a great loop. Definitley recommend!

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Gideon Moody
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BackpackingBugsRocky
First to Review

ONE OF THE MOST AMAZING TRIPS I'VE EVER DONE! Tough Hiking, AMAZING VIEWS and Wildlife encounters (Wild Grouse, Black tailed Deer and a young Brown Bear!).. What Could Be Better! Day 1-- I started out on Friday evening around 6:45 from the trail head at Jennie Lake (not suggested unless you are comfortable hiking in the dark) If you can arrive earlier, try to make the pass (Poop out Pass) before dark. I arrived at Jennie Lake on my first leg at around 10-PM and made Camp. I could tell there were others and tried to be quiet. Next morning I could make out about 6 or seven tents. Day 2-- After a few sunrise photos, a cup of coffee and an energy bar, I filtered some water and headed for my lunch stop at Twin Lake/Twin Peaks. There is still plenty of water in the back country so I don't usually carry more than about 20 oz. at a stretch to conserve weight. Knowing where the water sources are is helpful when planning your route and pack list. The Climb out of Jennie Lake wasn't too bad. Beyond Jo Pass there is a meadow near Clover Creek where I encountered a young Buck grazing. The Climb up to Twin Lake was difficult requiring mini breaks to rest my legs and maintain my breathing. It's very doable but be prepared to take your time. The thin air becomes noticeable above the 9,000 foot altitude mark but it is manageable. Take your time and take frequent breaks. Twin Lake has a "semi-private Pit" Toilet that is suggested for use. I hope to add many photos but the toilet is basically an out house with two rail plank walls. Yes only Two walls about 5 feet high There are Bear Boxes but the boxes are unusable. The view from the little lake is worth the visit to the toilet. Twin Peaks is located at the E/NE end of the "Little Lake" and offers a stunning view. I took a lunch break there and rested to prepare for the climb up Twin Peaks Silliman Pass. The Pass tops out about 10,644 according to my smart watch altimeter. I did't put much stock in the information considering that the peaks themselves are only stated to be 10,463, and the pass is lower by at least a few hundred feet. I looked up the published pass altitude and it's 10,160 feet. Still, it was a strenuous portion to tackle in the afternoon and a forming thunder head made me ditch my plan to climb up to the peaks. Better to plan a longer trip next time that face being struck by lightning strike at altitude in the back country. The hike through Silliman Pass and into the Ranger Lake / Lodge Pole offered some of the most Amazing and Breathtaking Views on the trip. I could see all the way across to the eastern and southern High Sierras and the southern portion of the Great Western Divide. Ranger Lake offers Bear containers on the improved campsites. The afternoon view was enough to have me stop for a rest and a snack. Seville lake was to be my next stop, but beyond the Lost Lake cutoff, the mosquitoes were pretty heavy. I decided to skip stopping here head for Rowell Meadow where my lack of a wilderness permit wouldn't offer me the chance for a violation. (Had I stayed, I'd be camping without a Wilderness permit). It would have been a nice option and had this been more that a spur of the moment plan on my part, I would have picked up the permit online. I had decided to save the $15. and simply "day hike" the area. Since I didn't take Friday off work (Highly recommended) stopping at the ranger station was not a choice. So,off to Rowell meadow and the permit free Jennie lake wilderness area I went. Darkness set in once again on the climb out of Belle Canyon. The late afternoon mosquitoes through this part of the hike made it my least favorite section. I hiked by flashlight to the Jennie lake boundary line and camped just short of Rowell meadow off the trail where the mosquitoes had ceased to be a concern. Day 3 (Sunday) Without access to water for coffee I broke camp and headed to Rowell Creek. I was on the trail just before sunrise at about 645 AM. BEAR ENCOUNTER: About 20 minutes away I took some pictures of Rowell Meadow from the Southern end and continued up the trail another 5 minutes or so when I heard a bear tearing open a stump for it's breakfast. I heard him and moved ahead cautiously until I spotted him about 50 yards away. I moved cautiously forward to see if there were any way around and to see if it was a mother with cubs. About 30 yards from it, I waited behind tree cover and scanned the area. The wind was still or I was downwind from the young adult brown bear because it was never alerted to my presence. After about 10 minutes I was certain there were no other animals in the area. I was going to have to wait it out or try to announce my presence gradually to see it I could spook him/her away. Brown Bears are not aggressive in general unless they feel threatened. Since I was between two trees and behind small growth up to my neck, the bear wouldn't be

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Gideon Moody
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HikingBugsRocky
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Vadim Mashevsky
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C N
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Brad van Scoyk
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Christina Merz
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Christina Merz
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Alanna Connor
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Tiffany Kwong
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Curtis Jensen
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Curtis Jensen
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wendi chen
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Jesse Belchamber
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Steve Foster
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Nicole parada
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Rich Gillock
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