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High Country Meadows Trail is a 9.2 mile moderately trafficked out and back trail located near Arnold, California that features beautiful wild flowers and is rated as moderate. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible year-round. Dogs and horses are also able to use this trail.

Length9.2 miElevation gain1620 ftRoute typeOut & back
dog friendlyHikingHorseback ridingMountain bikingNature tripsSkiingWalkingBird watchingRunningWildflowersWildlife
Description
Waypoints (4)
Contact
Tips

Hike along a section of the Upper Mokelumne River Canyon segment of the Mokelumne Coast to Crest Trail This is a lovely day hike with wildflower viewing in mid to late summer and fall colors in late fall. Unlike our lower altitude trails in the Camanche-Pardee segment, this trail, at 7200', is buried under mounds of snow in the winter. A nice 9.2 mile round trip is in store for you, with a couple challenging ridges to conquer. A less challenging option is a meadow meander, offering plenty to occupy an explorer, a family with children, or birdwatcher. Accessible by car at trailheads on both ends; Bear Trap Basin and Corral Hollow. Caution: Corral Hollow includes a steep but gradual 300+' ascent, and both trailheads are inaccessible based on adverse weather. Check with USFS Calaveras Ranger Station in Hathaway Pines for status. The Mokelumne Coast to Crest Trail is a 300+ mile, non-motorized multi-use trail bisecting California, roughly following the Mokelumne River from one end at the Pacific Ocean near Martinez to its headwaters at the Sierra Crest. There are five segments. The MCCT is about 50% complete, with more trail added each year. The MCCT is also one of twenty seven official California State Parks trail corridors that form a statewide trail system linking mountain, valley and coastal communities to recreational, cultural and natural resources throughout the state. The High Country Meadows Trail is in the Stanislaus National Forest.

The Mokelumne Coast to Crest Trail http://www.mc2ct.org California State Parks Trail Corridors http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=25680

High Meadows Trail Safety and Suggestions * Trail is dirt surface, width varies * Shaded and unshaded * Little to no cell phone service * Parts of the MCCT in the Stanislaus National Forest are on trails designated for motorized vehicles like jeeps and OHVs. * Post messages at Bear Trap Basin trailhead kiosk * Pack in your own water and food * Carry a GPS and bring a friend along * Weather changes rapidly in the high country. Check weather before going on the trail and be prepared for adverse weather * Signage - where the trail is signed it is marked at intervals with oval green, beige and white logo signs * Leave-No-Trace - The MCCT Council supports and encourages LNT practices while on the trail * Fire - Fire danger can be extreme, see Stanislaus National Forest's rules and regulations

Weather
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Reviews (5)
Photos (9)
Recordings (4)
Completed (6)
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Mary Boblet
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Hiking

Update from the Mokelumne Coast to Crest Trail Council: The High Country Meadows Trail is in the Stanislaus National Forest, not the Mokelumne Wilderness. Mokelumne Coast to Crest Trail is now accessed with free apps on ArcGIS Explorer, and free public account on ArcGISonline via laptop. For hikers, equestrians and bicyclists with some restrictions in the wilderness areas for bicycles. Trail is non-motorized although it shares some ATV/jeep trails between Moore Creek and Bear Valley.

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Mary Boblet
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the visitor above is commenting on a trail experiencing drought conditions.

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Steve Cox
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First to Review

OMG, this was one of the most unpleasant hikes we have ever done. There was literally not a drop of water the whole way and the scenery was very mediocre. There were literally thousands of blown down trees making the forest rather ugly. The meadows were pretty overgrown and dry. The vast majority is on dusty, very rough jeep roads. Anyway, as you can probably tell, did not enjoy much. Definitely not worth the grueling walks up the steep grades.

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Richard Engel
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Hiking
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Tyler Ray
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Hiking
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