Black Point Loop

HARD 5 reviews
#24 of 31 trails in

Black Point Loop is a 4.5 mile moderately trafficked loop trail located near Clayton, California that features beautiful wild flowers and is only recommended for very experienced adventurers. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible year-round.

DISTANCE
4.5 miles
ELEVATION GAIN
1177 feet
ROUTE TYPE
Loop

birding

hiking

nature trips

trail running

walking

views

wild flowers

wildlife

over grown

off trail

no dogs

A loop trail that incorporates Coulter Pine, Eagle Peak, Mitchell Rock Trails. Take Mitchell Canyon Road to Oak Road to Coulter Pine Trail to find the Eagle Peak Trail; its beginning may be a little faint, leading uphill opposite a downed oak tree. The trail parallels Back Creek and climbs gently up toward Twin Peaks. This is a wonderfully scenic loop at any time of year. passing through several distinct habitat zones - meadow lands, oak savannah, chaparral, rocky summits. and a fine stand of Coulter pines. The Eagle Peak Trail climbs steadily to meet the Mitchell Rock Trail at the crest of Twin Peaks. Visitors have forged a maze of informal trails, but stick to the crest to descend, to the lower Twin Peak, and you won't have any trouble. Pause to admire the brilliantly colored rocks at the and the venerable Great-Berried manzanita, survivors of many fires, with exquisite blooms in January and February. Twin Peaks have dangerous vertical drop-offs! When Mitchell Rock Trail chances into a fire road entering the bottom meadows, veer left back to the trailhead.

hiking
5 months ago

hiking
6 months ago

The map is correct for Black Point Loop, but the instructions are for a different hike! This is a wonderfully scenic hike with great views of the Mount Diablo summits in the distance. Parts of the trail are overgrown at present (June 2017), but still usable. Descending on the Black Point Trail to Red Road, you will get that wonderful feeling of being in the middle of nowhere.

hiking
6 months ago

This trail is highly overgrown with tall woody bushes, and un-navigable at the Black Point Summit. When we reached the Black Point Summit part of the trail (in the counter-clockwise direction), we had to turn back. Additionally, this trail is un-managed on the switch-back section of Red Road and was covered in dense weeds and grasses and we emerged covered in ticks in the nymph and adult stages, which can be vectors for Lyme disease.

I do not recommend this trail for anyone, even pro-hikers. While the climb and switchbacks are fine for moderate-pro hikers, the overgrown grasses/bushes are not safe and you will be in contact with the grasses/bushes/trees most of the hike with a high susceptibility for tick bites.

hiking
7 months ago

hiking
8 months ago