Pigeon Roost Trail

MODERATE 88 reviews

Pigeon Roost Trail is a 8.5 mile moderately trafficked loop trail located near Rogers, Arkansas that features a lake and is rated as moderate. The trail is primarily used for hiking, trail running, camping, and birding and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.

8.5 miles 1190 feet Loop

dogs on leash

birding

camping

hiking

trail running

forest

lake

views

wild flowers

bugs

rocky

The trail is a double stacked-loop trail; there is a short loop of approximately 4 miles for day hiking and a longer loop of 8.5 miles for overnight use. Primitive camping is allowed on the longer loop at five designated campsites only. Pigeon Roost Trail is in a figure eight shape that is made up by two loops, Dry Creek Loop 4.1 miles and Huckleberry Loop 4.3 miles. Please contact the Ranger at the phone number listed below to determine if there will be a campsite available. The trail is fairly short for an overnight trail, but there are several hills to climb which give the trail its difficulty rating.

hiking
13 days ago

I consider myself a "regular" in the Hobbs Conservation Area, and I've reviewed this trail before, so I'll keep it short. This trail, like others in Hobbs, has almost zero "wow" factor. However, there's a lot to see in terms of plant and animal life, and the trails are really nice and well-maintained. Don't make a special trip out of it, but if you live nearby or are in the area, they are worth checking out.

As for updates since my last visit:
1. That big tree blocking the trail (see previous reviews) has been cleared! Woot!
2. Hobbs will start taking reservations for camping sites soon, according to posted signs. Visit their website before you come to camp.
3. The Dogwoods are in their full glory right now! If you love them as I do, you're going to really enjoy this hike. They're everywhere.

hiking
14 days ago

I suppose I ended up feeling kind of "meh" about my whole experience, but don't get me wrong, it's a nice trail and all.

The views you get of the lake are nice. Really nice, in fact. You can even walk down to the lake if you want (unless someone is camping down there). However, if you're walking the trail counter clockwise, like I did, you blow through your scenic locations in the first few miles and then all you're left with are the woods. I mean, they're nice woods and all, but they don't really offer a lot of views, ya know? Sink holes were pretty nifty, though. I might recommend hiking clockwise for the best sight seeing order.

The vast majority of this trail is covered in gravel and it's not just little tiny rocks were talking about here. Whole stretches are covered in rocks that are an inch to about two and a half inches wide. Not sure why they chose gravel or if it has any purpose other than making it hard to walk on. You can probably tell that I personally don't like walking on gravel (or large loose rocks as the case may be) for eight miles. But, who knows, maybe you're into that kind of thing. A real gravel connoisseur. In which case... have a blast.

There are actually a few trees that have fallen onto the trail. Some are pretty big and some not so big. Either way, I think they're kind of fun. Some you can go around, some you have to climb over. They add something to think about, a problem to solve. They are in no way difficult to get past nor do they negatively affect the trail.

I love how the loops are set up on this trail. You've got four different ways you can augment your trip depending on what you're looking to get out of it. Dry Creek Loop (short), Huckleberry Loop (medium), Dry + Huckleberry (long), and the Figure Eight (extra long). You could also just hike in counter clockwise until you get to the benches that overlook the lake if you want a nice place to eat lunch.

Again, it's a nice trail. You definitely shouldn't avoid it or anything. If you're looking for trails in the area or are looking for ones of a particular length then you should absolutely give Pigeon Roost a try. Though, I can say that with the gravel and lack of really interesting sights to see ultimately land this trail firmly in my "One and Done" category. Unless I come back for camping, which I might do, just because the camp sites aren't all that far in and they feel pretty isolated.

23 days ago

I really enjoy doing the Dry Creek Lane early on a Saturday morning to start my weekend. Not to strenuous and it gives me a chance to challenge myself with my pace.

1 month ago

camping
1 month ago

backpacking
1 month ago

1 month ago

hiking
2 months ago

Trail is well marked and easy to follow. You are rewarded with beautiful views of the lake.

2 months ago

My wife, her two siblings, and I just completed the trail this morning. We stayed 1 night at campsite 5. Just a heads up, make sure you start early if you're camping. Campsites are first come first serve and this weekend all the sites were taken. All sites have tent pads and fire rings so that's a plus! The white trail maps at the sign in/bulletin board have a description of each site so you can pick based on that. Also don't be a dingus and decide to blaze your own path to the lake for water from camps 3-5. Following the main trail going clockwise will take you right down to a spot where it is pretty easy to get water. I, on the other hand, got to climb back up a nice steep 60 degree incline with my 5 gallon collapsible jug. Anyway onto the trail itself. It's of course 8.4 miles around the longer Huckleberry Loop and 4.2 around the Dry Creek Loop. Heading clockwise around you meet just one relatively steep incline before camp close after the first fork. Other inclines are either very gradual or short in length. Once past camp, there will be a series of 3 inclines going up the side of a hill then down on its opposite side for 3 hills. None of the inclines are really too harsh throughout. Some beginners may feel a good burn the last 0.7 miles back to the trailhead. Also, if you do decide to go counter-clockwise, you can expect to feel the burn at the first long incline you meet. So I would suggest going clockwise to avoid that major uphill. For the most part though, the trail is pretty flat. This was the second backpacking trip for my wife and I, and the first for my in-laws. I believe it to be a great hike for beginners. As far as the views go, the north side of the trail goes through forest along the side of multiple hills and sometimes coming to the top of them. Once you get to camp and onward you will see many more views of the lake, including a really beautiful view with benches about 1.2 miles from the trailhead. Also some pretty cool sinkholes are just under a mile past campsite 5. It was a great hike and I plan on doing it again!

hiking
2 months ago

2 months ago

3 months ago

3 months ago

Great views on lake side. Took us three hours to do the 8 mile loop- pretty easy terrain and relatively flat...

4 months ago

hiking
4 months ago

We did the full trail this time (the Huckleberry Loop), and enjoyed it much more than the shorter Dry Creek Loop: there are some nice lake views, another area where you can access the lake, and some really big sink holes that are kind of neat. It's pretty dull and brown this time of year, but the views are a bit better than in the summer, and it's nice and cool. Wear a little bit of orange if you think of it - just because the trail isn't closed for hunting the day you're there doesn't mean you don't want to be visible.

There is, indeed, a large tree on part of the trail, but it's not like you have to turn around and go back. You can go around/over it. Given the condition of the trail (very well-maintained), I expect it will be cleared within a year.

4 months ago

hiking
4 months ago

backpacking
4 months ago

5 months ago