Havasu Falls, Mooney Falls, and Beaver Falls

HARD 791 reviews

Havasu Falls, Mooney Falls, and Beaver Falls is a 24.5 mile heavily trafficked out and back trail located near Supai, Arizona that features a waterfall and is rated as difficult. The trail is primarily used for hiking, camping, and backpacking and is accessible year-round.

Distance: 24.5 miles Elevation Gain: 3,307 feet Route Type: Out & Back

backpacking

camping

hiking

cave

river

views

waterfall

wild flowers

wildlife

rocky

scramble

no shade

no dogs

Hikers must get a permit from the Havasupai Indian Reservation for this hike. You must get them well in advance. This is a very popular overnight backpacking trip. There are several variations hikers can do, including various falls, the confluence with the Colorado River, and the town of Supai. The Havasupai Indian Reservation is not part of the Grand Canyon National Park, but you cannot tell that from the scenery. From your very first step at the trailhead parking lot until your return at the end of your trip, you will be swiveling your head side to side to take it all in. The water is a turquoise blue/green and the perfect way to refresh the tired legs and back after the 12 mile trek down to the campground. The parking lot at the trailhead is stunning. It is perched more than 1000 feet above the valley floor and provides one of the best vistas of the trip. The trail starts with a steep descent down the face of the box canyon to the valley floor on a series of switchbacks. Be on the lookout for the approaching mules. They have the right-of-way, and won't stop to wait for you to move to the side. Once you reach the valley floor, the trail bends to the north and follows the wash for 8 miles into the town of Supai. Along the way, the canyon walls draw closer and the surroundings become more grand. You get a sense for the true size of the canyon walls when then tower hundreds of feet straight up as you make your way down the canyon. There is more shade in this narrow section of trail. The sun doesn't have the angle to penetrate the canyon and it helps to keep temperatures down. In this slot section ( which starts at about mile 7), you really need to watch for the mule packs. As they approach, move to the canyon wall side and not the cliff side. At the end of the slot section, it opens and the Havasu Creek comes in from the right side. As you cross the open expanse, following the trail as it curves to the left, you will hear the water for the first time. It comes into view as you enter the heavier vegetation. The town of Supai is close. You will follow the irrigation channel into Supai. The two miles following the town of Supai are packed with waterfalls, blue-green water, and tons of photo opportunities. It's just 2 miles to Havasu Falls from Supai. The campground and Mooney Falls are just beyond that. Visitors must camp overnight at either the campground near Havasu Falls or the Havasupai Lodge in Supai. Some adventurous hikers continue on to reach the confluence with the Colorado River.

hiking
muddy
rocky
scramble
5 days ago

We hiked from camp to Mooney Falls, up to Beaver Falls, back to Mooney Falls, Pass camp to Havasupi Falls and then back to camp! The trail was easy to follow and took more time going than coming back. The water was cool, but do able. We did switch from water shoes to warm socks/boots between the long water crossing breaks to help m stay warm. There is some scrambling at Beaver and Mooney.

hiking
fee
8 days ago

You have to pay and reserve in advance. I grabbed as many spots as I could afford when I made reservations. I could have easily gotten more reservations as my group of 12 people was quick to fill up. 8-9 mile hike Down canyon switchbacks was easy for experienced hikers (make sure those toe nails are cut or you’ll lose them and comfortable gym shoes are a must or the rest of your hike will be a bust) but if you pack too much or are inexperienced you’ll have trouble. Bring helpful people or they will desert you when you slow them down and friends get crabby after 6 miles of people slowing them down. One member of our group got sick and we had to stop for her often (tip: don’t hike on an empty or acidic stomach). Navajo Falls is relaxing- go swim. Havasu Falls is windy -go swim. It’s a hot climb back from Havasui Falls. Mooney Falls is thrilling but be safe because it’s a vertical climb down on slick canyon walls (bring gripping gloves, pack light) but you can literally have lunch on picnic tables in the falls. It was cold in Mooney falls (September 2019) because the shade from the cavern and roaring wind from the violent waterfall. Mist keeps the canyon walls slick but climbable. Beaver falls says it’s 2 miles from Mooney but more like 3+. You can climb up Beaver falls. Don’t stay too long at Beaver or the confluence because you still have to climb out of Mooney before dark and you cannot camp outside the campsite area. The Native Americans make great food and the horses and mules were well taken care of (we are horse owners so we could tell)...the internet videos were not accurate -don’t watch or support the agenda. The village dogs ignore you except for one black/white cattle dog mix who followed our group to every waterfall, jumped rocks through the surges, and played in the pools with us (we called him Little Supai or ‘Soups’ for short). It was an excellent hike just don’t overdo it because it is not for the novice hiker. Bring close to a gallon of water whenever you’re hiking there. I had two hydration packs 3L + 2L and never ran out of both but husband always ran out of water no matter if I gave him the 3L or 2L pack and he’d be drinking mine. The Blue-Green water is breathtaking! The squirrels didn’t destroy anything we brought but they were searching the campers for food. Enjoy your hike.

hiking
15 days ago

This was my first true backpacking hike and I loved every minute of it!!!! I can’t wait to go back with my family

16 days ago

Exceeded expectations regarding beauty. More traffic than I was hoping for but made for a community vibe around camp. Went in early November,.... would NOT do in summer, the heat would be a true killer. City folk who don't understand county living may say mules are "sad".... from what I saw, great shape, wonderful life, no issues. Drop one or two meals as you will eat in Supai. No issues with squirrels/raccoons. Toilets fine. Bring a good camera.

hiking
21 days ago

don't pass it up. it's awesome

backpacking
22 days ago

I did this trail 11/7-11/9. I was very worried that going in November wasn't going to be a good idea, but I was wrong. The trail was beautiful. The weather was fine. And all of the falls were massive. The hike in is long. It's about 8 miles to the small village of Supai where you check in. We stopped and had lunch in the café as well. Then it's another 2 miles to the campsite. You choose your spot to camp at random. Camp is 1 mile long with lots of spots to choose. Most of the spots have their own picnic table, as well as line to hang clothes and food, etc. that people have left behind. Parking at the trailhead is easy. There's a lot and then plenty of parking along the road. There is a bathroom there. The hike in is very easy. It's entirely downhill. If you enjoy long hikes you'll love it. If not, you'll want it to end. You'll see Navajo Falls first, after leaving the village of Supai. It's about a mile from the village on the way to the campsite. Navajo is great for swimming. Make sure to take the path to the bottom of the falls, as there's a great photo op as well as swimming hole. The next falls is the famous Havasu Falls. This is right before the campsite. These falls are amazing and a wonderful spot to hangout. Take a whole day to hike Mooney falls, Beaver falls, and the confluence (if you decide to do the confluence). The climb down to Mooney is a hard one. It's very slick, very tight, straight down, and you have to use the metal chains, rotten ladders, and metal rods. If you're afraid of heights or not as adventurous this one is not for you. I highly recommend if you can, bc Mooney falls and beaver falls are the best part of this trail. Once you're down Mooney falls, stop and take a photo and swim before heading to Beaver falls. Beaver falls is about a 2 mile hike from Mooney falls. It's an amazing hike. There are lots of creek crossings. You'll want to have water shoes. The hike is super flat and easy. It's beautiful. There are lots of cut offs but they all lead to the same place, so don't fret. Once you arrive at Beaver falls, you'll have to do a few more ladders before getting down to the pools of water. This is an incredible place to hangout for the day. If you'd like, continue onto the confluence which I didn't do but I believe is a few more miles down the canyon. If you're a strong hiker, the hike out is easy. It's not hard, so don't let the reviews stress you out. Up to the switchbacks at the end, it's a walk in the park. The switchbacks up to the trailhead are tough, especially with a pack. Go slow, take your time. The only thing I didn't like about the trail were the mules. It's hard to watch as they struggle to go up the switchbacks. You can tell they're miserable. It's awful. I tried not to look. If you cannot carry your pack both in and OUT of the canyon, you should not do this hike.

backpacking
28 days ago

The entirety of the hike and experience was worth it. The 10 mile hike to the village is a mix of sand and gravel through dense canyon walls, and into the Village of Supai and the campground. The grounds are clean with restrooms, with numerous unique camp spots along the creeks. The waterfalls speak for themselves too. To note, some older blogs mentioned taking inflatable tubes to the river but those are now banned. Additionally, there is no photography in the Village of Supai as well. Definitely be respectful, pack out what you pack in, and enjoy the trip!

hiking
fee
scramble
1 month ago

Very beautiful hike! You are NOT allowed to take any pictures of the Havasu Indian Tribe, the horses nor the Havasu village. The Indian folks will not talk to you unless they have to. They are shy. Some of them will greet you if you greet them. My advise, be respectful to them at any time. We would not like it either to have tourists in our town 24/7. If you see one of their food stands - I highly recommend their food!! Yum yum :)

hiking
1 month ago

Having done this once in November and once in July, I would only recommend going in the summer or when the weather isn't too cold to enjoy the water. The hike itself sucks. The first mile in (last mile on the way out) is extremely steep and cool, but after that it's a boring hike that goes on forever. Walking through the village is interesting. The 3 mile hike from the village to the campground is tough because of move elevation change and soft sand making it more difficult physically, like how it is walking on a beach, however there are some amazing views and waterfalls on this part of the hike. The campground itself is awesome, a GREAT place to stay. There is a spring for easy and good water. There is plenty of shade, and trees to hang a hammock, and water running through the whole campground. The bathrooms are good. It's a very nice place, in the summer anyway. It's in a canyon with very tall walls on either side, which provide shade for part of the day, perfect in summer, bad in winter. When I was there in November it was decent during the day. You didn't want to go in the water, but you did because it was possible too, but only briefly because it was still too cold to enjoy or spend any amount of time in. Then once the sun went behind the canyon walls early in the day, it was time to eat and go to your sleeping bags, as the cold would set in very fast and camp fires are prohibited year round. The only benefit to winter is the hike is much easier. In the summer months you'll have to be careful to hydrate properly and hike at night/early morning or late evening/night to stay safe, and it will still be hot and difficult. In winter, you can hike in broad daylight and be fine.

hiking
1 month ago

Havasupai was a dream. The permits were hard to obtain but, we were lucky enough to snag them. The hike was incredible. We chose to carry everything on our backs in and out. Pack light and tape your feet. The extra weight from your packs will affect your feet differently for the whole 20+ miles. So many people complained about blisters but we had none. I believe the trail is rated “hard” because of the length. It wasn’t too strenuous, but it is VERY, very long. When you think you’re almost there, you’re not. There is hot food nearby, but be sure to get there early as they tend to run low on supplies. The hike out was only difficult due to the ascent of the last hill. What a life-changing hike regardless! I hope we are lucky enough to return one day!

Hiked from the campground to beaver falls, which a beautiful hike. Reminded me a little bit of The Subway in Zion National park, walking along the side of the river, occasionally crossing it, and hiking over some rocks. Once at beaver falls we played in the pools and had a great time. Definitely upgraded our experience!

hiking
no shade
rocky
1 month ago

This was the most rewarding hike of my life! The terrain is very different at different points of the hike...sometimes rocky gravel and sand with limited shade, others closer to camp are wooded and damp, or by the waterfalls slick and wet rock and steep cliffs. I hadn’t seen anything as beautiful and wondrous as the hike in, seeing the scenery change as we descended into the Grand Canyon. There was beauty everywhere that continued for most of the 10 mile trek to camp. The blue-green waters of Havasupai Falls was so beautiful it felt surreal. The waters were chilly, but a welcome change to the hot and dusty hike down. Getting to Mooney Falls from camp requires a bit of scaling down the wet canyon wall aided by strategically placed handholds, chains, and wooden ladders that have seen better days...but so worth it. These falls are higher than Niagara Falls by almost 30 ft. and absolutely breathtaking. There are smaller falls and pools down and around the picturesque area...one with a rope swing that my 23 year-old son and I had a great time with, but always use caution to avoid injury (seasonal flooding can dislodge rocks and move them into unexpected places.) Continuing on past Mooney Falls there is a path leading to Beaver Falls a few more miles down. This trek along the canyon wall is a bit more difficult than I had expected, including multiple creek crossings of various depths, a 2 ft. wide bridge from one canyon ledge to another, some climbing over and around large rocks, and some wooden ladders (like the ones leading down to Mooney). There are many scenic overlooks with views of the creek and cascading falls along the way. Beaver Falls has been on my bucket list since I saw pictures of it back in high school. So, arriving at these falls was a huge moment for me. Keep in mind that there are many trails branching off along this hike, and the one back to camp is NOT always apparent. You will be hiking on slim paths along the steep canyon walls, so timing your hike back to camp before dark is critical. On day 4 we headed out on our 10-mile trek back up the canyon. I’m not going to lie, hiking up the the 2,400 ft elevation was grueling (even painful at times). Enough water is critical! When we hiked down it was later in the day when temps were fairly cool and we had decent shade. However, we began the hike out at 10am and underestimated our water consumption in the midday heat. We each had a 2.5 liter water bladder as well as a 20oz. water & 32oz. Gatorade we bought frozen in the village on the way out. We all ran dry about the same time with about a 1/2 mile of steep switchbacks left to the top of the canyon. Though my limits were tested, this was an experience of a lifetime!!

hiking
no shade
1 month ago

Stunning views. Not hard at all.

hiking
2 months ago

Amazing! This has been one of my favourite backpacking trips! After researching for months, I felt like I had adequately prepared and didn’t encounter any unexpected surprises. The hike is as challenging as people say. Our packs were probably 35lbs including two larger water bottles to tide us over until the campground. We stopped at one of the stores in Supai for a cold redbull. We carried our packs in and out, but if we were to do it again I would try to reserve a mule. Would love to do the helicopter but since there’s no way to get a reservation, I’m not willing to line up in Suapi at 4:30AM, for a chance to possibly fly out in the early afternoon if you’re able to get a seat. Here are some tips for anyone about to do this once in a lifetime adventure! - Get a mule. I backpack this distance quite regularly during the summer in the Rocky Mountains and workout about 4 times a week doing a combination of cardio and weights. My body can do it, but after 5 hours of hiking I struggle with blisters, even with proper footwear. - Start early! We thought ppl were exaggerating when they said they start at 5:30AM. But this time was perfect to avoid the afternoon sun. - I wasn’t prepared for the dust and how dry swimming in the waterfall made my skin. I wish I had a small tube of lotion. - We could have brought less warm clothing. We were there Sept 29 - Oct 1. I had read the nighttime lows were around 8 degrees Celsius so I brought my down puffy, fleece top base layer, and yoga pants as I do on other trips. I don’t know what the temperature actually got down to, but I did not need these layers at all. At night I laid in shorts and a tank top on top of my sleeping bag it was so hot. - I would probably not recommend this hike to anyone who has not backpacked before. Some of the reviews in the Facebook group and other online reviews scared me, but now that I’ve done it I’m thinking those types of reviews are written by people who were not experienced and did not adequately prepare. I thought the ladders and ropes down to Mooney were quite easy. ENJOY THE ADVENTURE OF A LIFETIME!!!

hiking
2 months ago

Best place in Arizona and quite possibly the US!

hiking
muddy
rocky
2 months ago

hiking
2 months ago

This was our first backpacking trip. It really pushed our bodies, but WOW is the reward worth the hike. We camped close to Mooney Falls right along the creek -- so beautiful! We found Little Navajo and Fifty Foot Falls to be the most underrated of the falls. We had an absolute amazing morning at these falls and had one of the pools/falls all to ourselves for hours. The hike to Beaver Falls is more about the trek than the destination, as Beaver Falls itself wasn't our favorite. In September, it was also completely shaded and cold in this area by noon. Havasu and Mooney are the most beautiful in my opinion, but the hike to Mooney and Beaver is no joke. In three nights/four days, we hiked over 40 miles and our bodies were DEAD by the hike out. We were glad we paid for a mule to carry our stuff. If we went again, I think we would helicopter out.

hiking
rocky
2 months ago

Started our hike at 5:45 am, perfect time to leave in mid-September. Take time to snap photos of the canyon as you descend. I carried a 22 pound pack and used trekking poles. Arrived at Supai village around 9:30 with lodge reservations. Could not check in until 1:00. We were able to leave our packs, put stuff in our day packs and continue hike to Havasu Falls. 2 mile hike back to lodge from falls. Total miles for day were just over 14. Day 2 hike to Mooney Falls then onto Beaver Falls. Online videos of the caves, chains and ladders did not look too hard, but it was difficult, especially coming out. Mooney falls was amazing, hike to Beaver Falls was also beautiful, crossed river 3 times and had to scoot on my bum in a few areas. Going up the ladders from Mooney was fine, but after the ladders, I was rock climbing. There was a 3-4’ stump about 6” in diameter that I had to stand on to get up to a rock, used chains, knee at one point and had pull myself up. It was very difficult for me. (I am 55, hike a lot and do spin classes, but not a lot of upper body strength or overall agility- chains and rock climbing looked easy for those with good agility.) A few months training at a rock climbing gym totally would have helped. Anyway total miles 12.5 back to the lodge. Day 3 left lodge at 4:00 am for an 8.5 hike out of the canyon. Goal was to beat the sun at the switchbacks and we did, actually a little chilly at the hilltop. Compost and port-a restrooms at hilltop. Restroom facilities with flushing toilets in Supai village, compost facilities near Navajo Falls and at least 3 compost facilities in the campground area. Fern Springs seemed to be in the middle of the campground, natural spring to fill up water bottles! The terrain was rocking and sandy going in. Village area and hike to the Havasu Falls was silt/sand. Hike to Beaver Falls was dirt, sand and water!

hiking
2 months ago

This is a spectacular backpacking trip with beautiful terrain and waterfalls. I would recommend 2-3 nights and hike at night when the temperature is cooler. The last 2 miles on your way out is difficult! Very challenging but worth every mile. Pack light!

hiking
no shade
rocky
2 months ago

Loved everything about the location and the trail all the way to Supai village, campsite and to all the Falls. Started the hike down to Supai village on 9/9/19 at 6:30am. Reached the village in 4 hours and then to the camp ground in another 1..40 hours. One should go deep into the camp ground, as close to Mooney Falls as possible to find good camp site. Climbing down the treacherous chain/ ladder combo to go down to Mooney Falls is all worth it. Some nice pools to take a dip and eat lunch. Hike to Beaver Falls is amazing. Remember you will cross three water bodies, and they can be dangerous if you are not careful. Spending time at the camp is very relaxing, access to 50ft Fall and Navajo Falls is easy and they both are extremely beautiful- again take a dip in the ponds. Hike through the canyon is amazing, take some breaks and admire nature. Hike back was not as bad as expected. Started at 4:30am from the campsite, reached the village in 1.20 hours, and at the Parking lot at 9am. Pls go through some training regiment before you go on this hike/camping trip, so you can enjoy your long hikes and not be a burden on your hike mates.

hiking
2 months ago

one of the best hikes I've done. the hike to Beaver falls was the best of the hikes that make up Havasu!

hiking
3 months ago

Totally killer hike. The fresh water spring (in campground) is a HUGE bonus and makes your biggest priority, water, a non-issue. The only bummer is SO many people completely disregarding the “carry out” your garbage rule. Take it OUT of the canyon in your pack. It is a gift to be able to experience the place, not a right.

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