Havasu Canyon Trail to Supai

MODERATE 57 reviews

Havasu Canyon Trail to Supai is a 14.8 mile heavily trafficked out and back trail located near Supai, Arizona that features a river and is rated as moderate. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible year-round.

DISTANCE
14.8 miles
ELEVATION GAIN
2129 feet
ROUTE TYPE
Out & Back

backpacking

birding

camping

hiking

trail running

river

views

wild flowers

wildlife

rocky

no dogs

hiking
4 days ago

7 days ago

hiking
15 days ago

If you are a lover of animals, BEWARE! You’ll want to remove this from your bucket list if you have any sensitivities to witnessing animal neglect. I wish I had read these reviews instead of listening to word of mouth on how great it was. If I had really known about the conditions of the animals I honestly never would have gone. I felt I was actually in a third world country based on the conditions of the animals in the town of Havasu, the hill top, and even close to camp. Within the first 15 minutes of my hike in I witnessed a horse carrying who knows how much weight in coolers almost fall to its death slipping on a switchback corner then almost getting its neck broken because it was part of a roped group and the horses didn’t stop right away; random hikers were the ones who helped lift/push it to be rescued because the carrier person didn’t want to free it of its gear to be freed of the neck wrapped rope and the impending cliff edge, I saw many starving horses, starving dogs and some animals sick with diarrhea because they weren’t getting proper nutrition and vet care, and horses standing in extreme heat with bleeding open sores. I’ve uploaded pics I could take of horses without breaking tribal respect for no pictures. Being on tribal land and not having adequate cell service to report concerns until by then it could no longer be “tracked/found” was crushing. Please read all the reviews and follow the advice of others in that if you do decide to go DO NOT use a hiking guide company that contracts with the pack mules - force them to use the helicopter, do not use the pack mules yourself, and do not uses horses as a way out. Support the tribe’s needs in other ways... with funding for food, education, etc and alternative options for supporting the tourism that helps them support their own families. Do right by the animals by not further funding this type of demand. Although it was pretty it wasn’t worth all the pain and suffering I saw around me. Also a sewer line broke up in town and was contaminating the water so enjoying the water was off limits the entire time we were there. All I really could and wanted to do the entire time was think of a good solution that would help end the cruelty yet work for the poor families, but I realized as long as people pay to use the pack animals, and there’s no federal intervention, this will continue. This wasn’t what I expected from what others raved about (some people choosing to ignore the problem?) and let’s just say I definitely didn’t get home feeling serene or relaxed from my “vacation” as expected. Go to Zion’s instead. Hike Angels landing, the narrows, or hike the Grand Canyon. Many other bucket list hikes with a good sense of challenge to chose from if you don’t have the stomach for this and aren’t ready to backpack in and out yourselves, or research a company that doesn’t perpetuate the mistreatment (I don’t know if one). Get it in writing though. I’ve seen companies say they were boycotting for change which made it to press, but they are back to using the mules. Do the research if you decide to use a guided service!

26 days ago

Does anybody know if you need permits for this trail?

28 days ago

hiking
1 month ago

We started the hike at 12:45 PM. Weather is OK in November to start late. Took about 4 hours to the village of Supai. A tribe of about 209 people. They are dependent on tourists but tourism is not developed ( a good thing) and adults remain aloof mostly. The children are a lot more friendly. The hike is nice, not too hard. Didn't need more than 1 liter of water per person.

hiking
1 month ago

backpacking
1 month ago

1 month ago

hiking
1 month ago

backpacking
2 months ago

hiking
2 months ago

2 months ago

Wonderful. The trail in and out was not bad at all. I will go back again.

hiking
2 months ago

hiking
3 months ago

hiking
3 months ago

hiking
3 months ago

hiking
4 months ago

backpacking
4 months ago

Our group left the Hilltop at about 2:45am so we could avoid the morning heat. We arrived in Supai just after the sun had risen about 4 hours later. I highly recommend leaving as early as possible since the canyon doesn't offer much shade. Wear shoes with stability because the majority of this hike (once down the switchbacks - about 2 miles down) is in a wash. Gorgeous hike with beautiful canyon sights. We didn't see any other people until we reached Supai and others were up and hiking out. I suggest carrying at least 3L of water and some powdered Gatorade for electrolytes and calories! You won't have access to clean water until you get to Supai and then 2.5 later at the campgrounds spring. We didn't filter the spring water, which was fine! The remainder of the hikes to Mooney, Beaver, and Havasu were gorgeous. You'll pass Havasu on your way to the campgrounds (about .5 miles before the camping area boundary). Mooney is about .75 miles from the beginning of the camping area with a hike down the cliff in addition. Beaver is another 2.8 miles down from Mooney. Our group hiked to Beaver partially through the water (we didn't use the trail for the first mile) and then utilized the trail for the last 1.8 miles. Absolutely amazing trip! If you go during the week, the crowds aren't large. We had Havasu to ourselves each morning until about 8am and we had Mooney to ourselves in the late afternoon. Highly recommend!

backpacking
5 months ago

Our group of 12 started out from Hualapai Hilltop at about 8am for the hike into Supai. This trial is hot and dry and most people head out early in the morning in order to avoid the midday heat. If you're looking for solitude, this isn't the place. As Havasu Falls is very popular, the trail is crowded with people hiking into Supai or on their way back out. In addition to hikers, mule trains would periodically come through carrying packs and supplies to and from the town of Supai. The hike into Supai is relatively easy once you descend into the canyon. From there it is mostly level terrain across the sandy and gravel trail. It took us about 5 hours to get into Supai as we spent a lot of time stopping for photos, taking breaks where our guides would give us some explanation of the area, and waiting for the others in the group to catch up. Once in Supai, you had to check in and from the town it was another 2 mile hike to the campgrounds. We hiked out 3 days later. We left the campground in the dark at 5:15am. A group of 4 of us took the lead hiking at a good pace with minimal stops. We were eager to get back to Hualapai Hilltop before we lost most of the canyon shade and the heat of the day set in. The last uphill part through the switchbacks back to Hualapai Hilltop was definitely brutal but our group of 4 were able to make it back at 8:30 with the last of our group finishing just after 9:30