Sipsey Wilderness Loop Trail

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Sipsey Wilderness

Sipsey Wilderness Loop Trail is a 24 mile moderately trafficked loop trail located near Haleyville, Alabama that features a waterfall and is rated as moderate. The trail is primarily used for hiking, camping, nature trips, and backpacking and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.

Distance: 24.0 miles Elevation Gain: 1,558 feet Route Type: Loop

dogs on leash

backpacking

camping

hiking

nature trips

cave

forest

river

views

waterfall

backpacking
blowdown
washed out
26 days ago

Backpacked early May. 209 had been hit hard by the spring storms. many new blow downs and the trail had been washed out in places. My GPS had us just under 21 miles without visiting the big tree. overall great hike

hiking
muddy
rocky
1 month ago

Great trail. Lots of cool waterfalls. Great for families

blowdown
muddy
rocky
3 months ago

loved this hike. I backpacked in early on a saturday morning at around 6 and had easy going, some parts where hard to find. I hiked till about 4 and set up camp near a brook and waterfall. I did get lost but thanks to my.water source found my out. will definitely be back.

backpacking
6 months ago

This is an excellent route (although note that the original recorded route has a backtracked section due to the hiker passing the Bee Branch Trail, so it's closer to 21 miles). The trail is book-ended with a somewhat boring features, but those are short-lived. Featuring the fat-man squeeze, the fording of Borden Creek, a gorgeous canyon full of old-growth trees and stunning rock formations, several waterfalls depending on rainfall, a short but challenging boulder hop, and an impressive cliff that cracked and shifted to leave a hole known as the "Eye of the Needle", this hike won't disappoint. Hiking it all in one day would certainly be a feat, but it can be easily completed with a one night stay just after crossing the creek. Blowdowns are present but somewhat easily overcome. If it has rained heavily or recently, the creek may be higher than you wish to navigate.

backpacking
7 months ago

Heads up. Due to the drought, Sipsey River is barely flowing and creeks are dry. A burn ban is in effect so no campfires.

hiking
Tue Nov 27 2018

I called the National Forest Service and they said that since Sipsey Wilderness is part of Bankhead Wildlife Management Area (hunting is allowed) and Bankhead National Forest, they do not “promote” day use, as such, at least not to the extent as some forests. There is a small team of trail volunteers that had to go through forestry training in order to provide maintenance to the trails. For example, no gas chainsaws are permitted and all trees must be cut with hand saws, if they are allowed to be cut at all. Also, NO BLAZING OF, NOR ON, TREES. And I am guessing that the trail post numbering are probably a curtesy of the volunteers and not the Forest Service. So if you are wondering why the trails are so primitive or seem unkempt, this is why.

hiking
Mon Apr 30 2018

This area was great. While most of our day was off trail, exploring other areas, we did find quite a few cool things both on the trail and off. We are planning to return again soon, to hike farther and find more cool things.

hiking
8 months ago

hiking
Fri Mar 22 2019