Mount Fuji (Fujisan) Yoshida Trail

HARD 15 reviews

Mount Fuji (Fujisan) Yoshida Trail is a 18.7 kilometer heavily trafficked loop trail located near Fujiyoshida Shi, Yamanashi, Japan that features beautiful wild flowers and is rated as difficult. The trail is primarily used for hiking, walking, nature trips, and birding and is best used from July until September.

DISTANCE
18.7 km
ELEVATION GAIN
1506 m
ROUTE TYPE
Loop

birding

hiking

nature trips

walking

views

wild flowers

wildlife

Fuji-Subaru Line 5th station has gift shops, food, and restrooms. There are restrooms (200JPY per use) at points along the trail, primarily at the huts. 1st week of July all the summit buildings were closed, so plan on getting water and using the restrooms at the 8.5th station. It's a long dry walk down along a different route with fewer facilities.

hiking
2 months ago

hiking
2 months ago

It was tougher than expected. We left 5th station at 5:20 PM on August 28th. We made it to one of the huts of station 8 at about 8:00 pm. Spend the night there and started towards the top at 2:00 AM. The crowds were big and the ascend was slow and in the middle of rain and wind. We made it to the top right before the sunrise. The hardest part is the descend in loss gravel and very steep trails. There was no one around us that did not end up the floor, us included. It is worthy but the crowds make it very slow if you plan to see the sunrise.

2 months ago

Did it about 3 years ago; amazing view at the top. Had snow in July. Sleeping accommodations are expensive and they essentially line you up like sushi, but it makes a fun memory.

hiking
3 months ago

It's a very Japanese thing to do. I am so grateful I was able to experience it. It is not easy. Like a marathon, anyone can do it but, at one's own pace and only if a strong desire exists, and good physical and mental conditioning. There are many places to 'step up'. Poles are common, sometimes they get in their own way.

The sleep over experience is a kick! Terrible sleep! But, part of the experience. The curry/rice dinner was tasty.

I stayed at 8th station and began in Amageshi (1st station), part of the traditional trail. Most people start at 5 th station. If you are an athlete with strong body, willingness to sweat, and want more of the spiritual trek experience, start low. (Japanese I spoke to wondered if I really wanted to do that?!). I saw very few people on the lower portion. (Below 5th station). For me this was success. However, I was glad to join in the flow later on. It is unlike anything I have ever experienced and I admire the Japanese in this tradition. Others are smart to begin at 5th station as this lower part is no walk in the park and climbs from the get go!

We woke up at 1:30am, in time to summit by sunrise (August). There was a continuous snake of headlamps winding to the top. All of us connected in our journey. Freezing cold and windy! Make sure to bring many layers and perhaps, rent a puffy jacket or bring one, for the top!

Sunrise was spectacular. The numbers of people standing in reverence, emotionally touching. Despite the numbers, I took quite a few photos without obstruction. And then, descended the path, soft but steep.

Fuji San reveals himself rarely in August, but in that day, the clouds parted. If you decide to climb Mount Fuji, I hope you are as fortunate as me!

hiking
3 months ago

3 months ago

Did this in the 90's, slept at last hunt & left early to reach summit for sunrise-wow!

hiking
3 months ago

4 months ago

Amazing hike. Stay at station 8.5 overnight and hike to the summit for the sunrise. You won't be disappointed.

hiking
4 months ago

hiking
4 months ago

hiking
4 months ago

5 months ago

hiking
7 months ago

I have a friend in Japan who took me to hike Fuji-San during the season everything around it opens (like the checkpoints). When I told him I wanted to hike it, he told me the thing to do is hike it at night and watch the sunrise from the top. We hiked it starting at 7:00pm, and climbed our way to the top by 3:00 am. There were literally thousands of other people hiking it with us, so at no point did I feel like I'd be stranded alone. Bring some cash because the checkpoints along the way have refreshments, snacks, and restrooms (it was a few hundred yen to use restrooms). Once at the top we had to rush to find a spot to sit down on the eastern side as by the time we had settled in there was practically standing room only, but it was entirely worth it once the sun came up. It was one of the most incredible experiences I've ever had, and I wish I could relive every moment of it.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Best trail ever! Not too steep, but definitely not for the faint of heart.
Took 8.5 hours to climb the yellow trail from 5th level. Take oxygen, remember to stop frequently or you'll get sick.

hiking
Saturday, July 16, 2016

This is our hike up Mount Fuji (富士山 Fujisan). We did this on July 5th, just after the official hiking season opened and used the Yoshida Trail starting at the Fuji-Subaru 5th station. We traveled from Tokyo on a JR train (Chūō Main Line Rapid Service) to Ōtsuki Station, and then to Kawaguchiko on the Fujikyu Railway service. This website provided particularly good instructions on how to do this and it was easy.
http://chasingplaces.com/how-to-get-from-tokyo-to-kawaguchiko-mount-fuji-by-train-using-the-japan-rail-pass/
We actually got off a couple stops before Kawaguchiko Station, at Fuji Station, where the bus to the Fuji-Subaru Line 5th station originates. If you wait until Kawaguchiko, the buses are crowded! http://www.japan-guide.com/bus/fuji.html
Video of our hike: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M__bgbq1cQs
We started from the 5th station at about noon. The length of Yoshida trail is approximately 3.6 miles on the way up (4824’ gain) and 4.3 miles on the route down. Deceptively short!! The trail starts off very easy and is a wide volcanic ash path with bits of shade along the way. By the time you get to the 6th station, about .9mi in, the trees have disappeared and the trail starts to ascend more steeply. DO NOT FORGET YOUR SUNSCREEN LIKE WE DID! Bring a lot of 100JPY coins, restroom use is 200JPY at each station. If you have a touristy Fuji walking stick, bring even more, as it takes 200-400JPY to get it branded at each station. Also, drinks get more expensive the higher you go, from 200JPY at the bottom to 500JPY near the top. As you approach the 7th station .6mi further, the trail starts to get very steep. We stayed at the Kamaiwa-kan hut at the 7th station (http://kamaiwakan.jpn.org/english/). It was easy to make a reservation online and was not too high up the trail. We got there late afternoon and rested until dinner at 6PM, then went to sleep until midnight when we continued our journey. A good headlamp is necessary and I’m glad I had my Zebralight with me. The trail is just relentless on the way up from the 7th station. By the time we got to the 8.5 station, it was time to watch the sun rise (4:20AM). The sun rises very early on Fuji! I was also glad for the rest because my lungs could not get enough air for me to move very quickly. After sunrise, we continued to the summit. This was the most difficult part of the hike for me and I needed rest every few minutes. My legs were fine, I just could not get enough air, which caused dizziness and short periods of nausea. The Yoshida Trail summit (12267') was a welcome sight! Because we hiked so early in the season, the summit shops were still closed, as were portions of the crater circumference trail. I was told these open up after the 15th of July. NO RESTROOM and NO WATER this time of year at the summit. I hiked around to the crater side of the buildings to see the crater, which was a spectacular sight. I’d never seen the crater of a volcano before. The wind was howling at around 40mph and the temps were in the mid 30s…with the clouds blowing through, it was wicked cold. The trail back down is different from the way up and consists of mostly soft ash, which is hard to walk on…kind of like hiking on the beach. My legs were dead by the time we got back to the 5th station bus 24hrs later. This hike was definitely worth it for me, has spectacular views, and was the 1st time I’d hiked at any real altitude, let alone 12K feet. One day I plan to get to Everest base station…I need to do more cardio if I’m even going to step foot near that place!