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Takeno Shitamichi

moderate 5 reviews

Takeno Shitamichi is a 4.0 kilometer moderately trafficked loop trail located near Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan that features a great forest setting and is rated as moderate. The trail is primarily used for hiking and walking.

Distance: 4.0 km Elevation Gain: 188 m Route Type: Loop

kid friendly

hiking

walking

forest

views

historic site

If you want to avoid tourists and visit many small shrines to feel their connections to the community, check out 竹の下道 (Takeno Shitamichi). Instead of walking with the big crowd, you take a right turn to Fushimi Kandara Jinjya, which holds 10 divine treasures. In the 8th century, the shrine was in the Inari Mountain. In 1957, the shrine was rebuilt in the current site. The shrine is reportedly associated with the legend of Kaguya Hime. After the shrine, continue on to 竹の下道 (Takeno Shitamichi). This will take you away from the main path to the top of the Inari Mountain. The path goes through the bamboo forest as the name of the path suggests, and many small shrines that are deeply connected to the community. There was the fence with a post “beware of wild boars” but the fence was broken, so be aware! There are many shrines with a tiny waterfall to purify one’s spirit. However, all these small shrines are not owned by Fushimi Inari, but they are on private lands. So some shrines have posts asking tourists not to enter, especially to the waterfalls. Please be respectful. If you are interested in Japanese religion and culture, this is a very interesting place to visit. At one point, the trail forks into two - one to the Mount Inari, and the other one to Oiwa Shrine. From that on, the trail to Mt. Inari becomes switchbacks with natural stairs, and climbs up sharply to the top with many red torii gates. You can extend this trail if you are up for it. Or you can take the main path back.

hiking
1 month ago

very nice alternative trail to the top of Mt Anari. many quiet shrines and a cool bamboo grove. recommend going early in the morning to avoid that large amounts of tourists.

hiking
4 months ago

To get away from millions of people, we took the parameter of the shrine to the summit of Mount Inari. This path is called "竹の下道". The bamboo forest path goes through several tiny shrines with small "waterfalls," which seemed to be closely connected to the community. At one point, the trail forks into two - one to the Mount Inari, and the other one to Oiwa Shrine (I am not entirely sure). From that on, the trail to Mt. Inari becomes switchbacks with natural stairs, and climbs up sharply. We are from Boulder, CO, so we were supposed to be super humans on the sea level, but that was a myth sadly. Here is the website https://tinyurl.com/yxacwuo9 I took one star out as it was hard to take photos without including man-made stuff such as a blue tarp and galvanized steel sheets. I understand that the section is not only the shrines but also the living quarters, and it is not fair to expect the residents to remove things that are necessary for their living, but it was .a bit disappointing. Small shrines are on the private lands, and some do not allow tourists/hikers. So please be respectful.

hiking
4 months ago

hiking
4 months ago

hiking
Mon Nov 05 2018