Kaniakapupu Ruins and Luakaha Falls [PRIVATE PROPERTY]

EASY 115 reviews

Kaniakapupu Ruins and Luakaha Falls [PRIVATE PROPERTY] is a 2.4 kilometer heavily trafficked loop trail located near Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii that features a waterfall and is good for all skill levels. The trail is primarily used for hiking, walking, nature trips, and bird watching and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.

Distance: 2.4 km Elevation Gain: 71 m Route Type: Loop

dogs on leash

kid friendly

hiking

nature trips

walking

bird watching

forest

waterfall

wildlife

bugs

muddy

private property

historic site

The falls are on PRIVATE PROPERTY. Due to recent vandalism, the Kaniakapupu Ruins are CLOSED. Anyone found in the watershed area can be cited. Refer to the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources for more information: http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/blog/2019/03/28/nr19-063/

hiking
bugs
over grown
private property
1 month ago

I used the AllTrails map to find the entrance. The map is slightly confusing/incorrect because the entrance is where the trail crosses the road on the map, not where it shows that it starts. It's an opening in the bamboo on the side of the road. The trail to the ruins is wide and easy to walk. You just turn left at the Y and it leads to the ruins. To get to the top of the waterfall is a little more difficult. The trail has bamboo and trees fallen across it. It's also confusing at the Banyan tree. You turn left just before the giant Banyan tree and walk on the side of a concrete retaining wall/ jump across the small ditch to the retaining wall. It looks like there might not be a path, but it is there, just covered with fallen trees/bamboo. Once you get to the waterfall, if you look down, you can see someone's backyard. Most definitely bring bug spray; there are many mosquitoes that bit me despite covering myself in repellant.

hiking
muddy
1 month ago

hiking
3 months ago

Check out the DLNR link for more info. Apparently, some idiots carved a large heart into a stone wall of the ruins sometime around Valentine's Day 2019. This is the 2d time something like this has happened. Yes, the ruins are a fascinating, tactile glimpse into early post-contact Polynesia, but they're also fragile and are located on off-limits "private" Watershed property. Despite this, locals have always found their way there and although I believe that most visitors act maturely and respectfully, there seem now to be an increasing number of fools who thoughtlessly or deliberately destroy or remove priceless artifacts. Even stones. What to do? The DLNR has come up with what could be a good solution. Rather than erect a chainlink fence around the ruins, which would keep out some Native Hawaiians who want to respectfully commune with this "sacred" site, but probably would not keep out the most fervent pranksters and vandals, they're building pathways from log+plantings barriers -- intended to be visually and spiritually compatible with the surroundings -- along with educational signs. The idea here is that when the inevitable curious trespassers find their way in, they'll learn enough about what they're looking at to understand that staying on the paths is the best way to avoid further damage to delicate, crumbling, and unreplaceable structures. Some have expressed the opinion that the prohibition is just an example of the resentment and provincial racism many locals harbor toward "haole" tourists. OK, that may make sense from one perspective, but I urge you to think of the DLNR's solution as more of an effort to preserve delicate, priceless historical artifacts that, after hundreds of years, are now suddenly threatened by rapidly increasing social-media fueled tourism. The barrier system should be in place later in 2019, and if you decide that you still want to visit for whatever reason, please be mindful that you're technically an uninvited trespasser in an area that has enormous cultural significance to the people of Hawaii. Educate yourself beforehand about what you're looking at and act accordingly -- or decide that a better idea is to enjoy the ruins remotely on the Web. You can turn a potentially negative experience into an opportunity for learning about the Hawaiian culture and one of the most important Polynesian artifacts in the world. Kudos to the DLNR for a creative soluton for protecting the ruins that seeks to understand and respect the viewpoints of all parties. Aloha, friends.

Park to the side of the road where the trail goes into the woods. “Y” shaped trail, the Left one leads to the ruins of a king and the Right leads to the top of a pretty waterfall. Pretty but unmaintained trail. Dog friendly.

hiking
blowdown
bugs
muddy
off trail
over grown
private property
rocky
scramble
washed out
4 months ago

hiking
bugs
off trail
private property
4 months ago

Enjoyed it. Falls was muddy from weather.

hiking
bugs
over grown
private property
4 months ago

It was a beautiful trail! Tricky to find the right path to take and the waterfall was brown and muddy from the rain, but it would be beautiful on a clear day.

4 months ago

it was hard to find the right path, but easy once you find it. awesome, easy and short hike

hiking
bugs
muddy
5 months ago

Short easy hike. Some tree roots. Ruins were cool to explore.

hiking
blowdown
bugs
muddy
over grown
5 months ago

hiking
muddy
5 months ago

Quick hike up to the ruins, just bear left at the split. Path to the right lead to the falls but is overgrown and difficult to navigate after exiting the bamboo forest. The most difficult part was finding the trail head.

hiking
5 months ago

Easy hike. Instead of turning left at the fork to head to the ruins(which are amazing go pay your respects and check it out), if you go straight and walk about a half a mile, all the way to the banyan tree (will be on your right) , go under it and hang a hard left down the side of the mountain, where all the bamboo trees are. You will find a giant waterfall. The waterfall is on private property(literally someones backyard) so be respectful and do it in small groups. You need to be in pretty good shape because you must use the bamboo trees to help you down the large hillside, and use it to pull you back up to get back to the trail on the way back. My doggo could do it, but hes a pretty experienced hiker.

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