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Bronte Connections Circular Walk is a 7.1 mile loop trail located near Keighley, West Yorkshire, England that features a lake and is rated as moderate. The trail is primarily used for hiking and walking.

Length 7.1 mi Elevation gain 1,171 ft Route type Loop
Hiking Walking Lake Partially paved Views Wild flowers Wildlife Historic site
Description
Waypoints (0)

This walk follows a number of sites with literary associations to the novel 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte (1818 - 1848). Starting in the linear village of Stanbury, stone cottages and austere buildings, rather than busy Haworth you are soon onto the moors. Points of interest include - Ponden Hall - a listed Elizabethan farmhouse thought to be the inspiration for 'Thrushcross Grange', the home of the Linton family in the novel. A door in the gable end is where 'the ghost' appears. Ponden Kirk - is not a church but an outcrop of grit stone in the semblance of a tower in Ponden Clough. It is the setting of 'Penistone Crag' in 'Wuthering Heights'. Alcomden Stones - although not thought to be depicted in the novel will certainly have been visited many times by the wandering Bronte sisters. If you want to immerse yourself in the full Brontesque experience and feel the wild open spaces then this is the place to be. The view to the west is to Crow Hill and the summit of Bouilsworth Hill. The 'capstone' used to be thought to be a dolmen, or chambered tomb, but it is actually natural, though has long had druidical folklore attached to it. Withins Height - (or Delph Hill) would not have had a trig point in the Bronte period. Top Withins - was the inspirational setting for the fictional 'Wuthering Heights' farm house and is the place countless tourists walk the 3.5 miles from Howarth to see. Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath both wrote poems about the site. People travel halfway around the world to visit the ruin, with many Japanese among them. It is on the route of the Pennine Way and many a weary walker must have rested amongst these ruins. It was last occupied in 1926. The Bronte Bridge and Waterfalls - The original bridge was destroyed by a flash flood in May 1989 and rebuilt in 1990. It is constructed in the 'clapper big' fashion, being a long flat stone supported by abutments. There is a plaque below the bridge. The falls are in side channel of the beck.

Weather
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Reviews (6)
Photos (110)
Recordings (4)
Completed (11)
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Andy Clark
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 7, 2020
HikingGreat!

Beautiful walk, not too tricky. As noted elsewhere it gets a little difficult about 2/3rds through dropping down from the rocks to the grouse pits where the path isn't easily visible, but still manageable in combination with the app. A little boggy in this area too, but my boots were pretty much clean when I finished, so not that bad. Will definitely walk this route again.

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Renate Renate
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 4, 2020
Hiking

Loved the walk! One part was a little hardgoing, there was no trail and it was boggy.

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Jen Spence
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarAugust 30, 2020
Walking

walked anti clockwise, easy stomp out - lots of midgeys!

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Mike Bradley
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarJanuary 3, 2020
WalkingMuddyOff trailOver grownScramble

3rd Jan 2020: Great walk, however has some challenges. We walked it in the clockwise direction and once you get 100m past Top Withins, the footpath disappears entirely and we found ourselves zig-zagging across boggy moorlands trying to find it. Did eventually find a path that leads past several shooting position for grouse shooting, but not the route as shown. Also, quite wet on the tops, although a good pair of walking boots will keep your feet dry. A lovely walk!

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Laura Bradley
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarSeptember 14, 2019
HikingMuddy
First to Review

What a brilliant walk! I really enjoyed it and the sights were amazing. Highly recommended

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Sylvia Andresco
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarGray StarGray StarAugust 19, 2019
Hiking