Cerro Castillo Circuit is a 35.3 mile moderately trafficked point-to-point trail located near Coihaique, Aysén, Chile that features a lake and is only recommended for very experienced adventurers. The trail is primarily used for hiking, camping, and backpacking and is best used from November until May.

Length35.3 miElevation gain7,788 ftRoute typePoint to point
BackpackingCampingHikingForestLakeRiverViewsWildflowersWildlifeRockyFee
Description
Waypoints (2)

The Cerro Castillo Circuit is one of the most popular trails to hike in Patagonia. No crowds, no lodges, just nature and Patagonia at its finest. The circuit takes you through the best parts of Cerro Castillo National Park and through two incredible passes so you can stand face to face with the Castillo spires and glaciers. For more detailed information on current conditions and planning your trip, visit the official park website at http://www.parquenacionalcerrocastillo.cl/

Weather
UV Index
Daylight
Reviews (6)
Photos (23)
Recordings (16)
Completed (9)
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Jorge Raasch
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarJanuary 20, 2021
Hiking
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Jorge Raasch
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarJanuary 19, 2021
Hiking

Señalizado, harta pendiente, sin agua hasta campamento Porteadores

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Nicolás Van Sint Jan
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarFebruary 5, 2020
HikingRockySnow

This is a 4-day hike that goes through Cerro Castillo National Park. The trail goes through mountain passes, river crossings, and green forests, all while offering stunning views at numerous peaks, lakes and hanging glaciers. It's not as crowded as Torres del Paine's hiking circuits and it arguably provides equally impressive landscapes. For more information about recommended equipment, fees, camp grounds along the trail and ways to get there visit: http://www.parquenacionalcerrocastillo.cl

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David Tillery
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarJanuary 1, 2020
BackpackingBugs
First to Review

This is an awesome 4 day trek with too many incredible sights to mention. You can find a ton of infor about the trek on the well-maintained park site: http://www.parquenacionalcerrocastillo.cl/?lang=en The main takeaways from my experience are: 1. The black flies here, common in Patagonia I believe, are some of the worst I’ve ever experienced. They are big, they are persistent, and they will bite you through your clothing. We brought some permethrin-based bug spray and it did not seem to have any effect on them. We survived but maybe look into something a bit stronger with flies for your own trip. 2. If possible when planning this trek give yourself some wiggle room on either end of your itinerary to adjust your dates on account of weather. Two of the mountain passes can be dangerous in bad weather, and it would really suck to have some of the magnificent views from the tops taken away by low clouds. 3. If you start from Coyhaique as we did you can get one of a couple of buses in the morning that leave from the small terminal heading south towards Cochrane, just tell them you want to be let off at Las Horquetas. When returning after you get to Villa Cerro Castillo you can generally either hitchhike try to get on a bus heading north (may be full). There is also a small shuttle that runs from the Villa to Coyhaique in the morning, I believe there was a number for it listed outside the bus terminal but I do not remember the name, you may need to ask around. 4. There are lots of cows around on the first day so I would not drink unfiltered water then, but after that we did not filter anything coming from the mountains and were fine, but YMMV. Also good luck dodging all the cow pies. 5. The water crossings are cold but easy, knee high at most. I’d suggest bringing sandals and a towel to dry yourself. 6. The two pass ascents in the middle days are no joke, start them early. Both are preceded by small side detours you can take to glacial lakes, a mile or two out of the way. Both of these are poorly marked trails that are mostly scrambling over boulders and rocks. The 2nd was worthwhile to see but the first I would skip. Regardless I’d try to do them the evening before rather than the morning before the pass. On the last day you can do the final lake in the morning before you head down to the trailhead as the final trail section is all downhill and short. Like I said, read the park site for much more info. This was a hard, stunning trek, completely worth it.

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Stefanie Wai
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarJanuary 31, 2016
Hiking

Simply incredible and such a fun multi-day hike. It's the full package of views, mixed terrain (rocky passes, crossing glaciers and streams, lakes, forests) and good campsites that have plenty of exploring to offer. While you could blitz through it quickly, it's worth spending 4 days to just enjoy the full experience and allow for sunbathing, swimming in the icy lakes, yoga stretching in a meadow after logging in your miles that day. Straightforward to get to the route start. You have to register and pay an entrance. Expect the route to ascend and descend, with more up-and-down than flat. Not too technical - expect a few steady uphill sections, and the paths are pretty obvious.

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Jorge Raasch
Yellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarYellow StarJanuary 21, 2021
Hiking
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