The Pine and Popple Rivers offer a true wild experience, being among Wisconsin's more remote river systems. The area is rugged and undeveloped. Access is limited and often difficult. Don Lintner photo - canoeing on the Pine River Canoeing on the Pine River Don Lintner The shorelines are heavily wooded with sugar maple, yellow birch, hemlock and white cedar on the upper stretches and aspen, silver and red maple, white and jack pine the most common trees on the lower reaches. The rivers' moods alternate from quiet sections that meander lazily through lowland forest to swift rocky riffles, low rapids, and waterfalls. These rivers offer high quality paddling and fishing in a secluded, natural environment. Examples of other enjoyable opportunities along the rivers include hunting, hiking, bird watching, and photography. The rivers' greatest attractions are the miles of undeveloped river that allows everyone a chance to find their own special place. The entire 89-mile length of the Pine River and the 62 miles of its major tributary, the Popple River, were designated by the Wisconsin legislature as State Wild Rivers in 1965 to be protected from development and kept in a natural, free-flowing condition. Being among Wisconsin's more remote river systems, the Pine and Popple Rivers offer a true wild experience. The area is rugged and undeveloped. Access is limited and often difficult. Both the Pine and Popple Rivers are born in the vast forests and swamps of the Nicolet National Forest [exit DNR]. Within the Forest boundary approximately 80% of the upper 56 miles of the Pine River and 58% of the upper 50 miles of the Popple River are in federal ownership. Mid-way along their courses the rivers leave the national forest and enter the Pine-Popple Wild River project area managed by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The DNR's project area includes the lower 12 miles of the Popple River and the lower 33 miles of the Pine River, ending with the Pine at the Menominee River. At present, approximately 80% percent of the 12,000 acre project area is in public ownership, either the State or Florence County. The remainder is comprised of small privately owned tracts or property owned by We Energies. Stewardship of the wild rivers is shared by all landowners along the river small private landowners, commercial timber companies, and county, state, and federal governments. Also included are lands owned by We Energies in conjunction with their hydroelectric operations at the Pine River and Kingsford dams, which pre-dates wild river designation.

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