Looking for a great trail in Mount Adams Wilderness, Washington? AllTrails has 6 great hiking trails, backpacking trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 3 moderate trails in Mount Adams Wilderness ranging from 14.5 to 19.2 miles and from 3,841 to 6,433 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!

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backpacking

views

The Mount Adams Wilderness, located in southwest Washington State, surrounds the western slopes of the 12,276' tall Mount Adams, the second tallest mountain in the state and the third highest mountain in the Cascade Range. Surrounding its slopes is a cornucopia of natural beauty. Find old growth forests, high alpine rock gardens, small lakes and tarns, subalpine meadows, and more wildflowers than you can shake a walking stick at! Hike through miles of trails that explore this pristine and rugged land. Mount Adams is also the biggest stratovolcano in the northwest. Mount Adams, the "Forgotten Giant," rivals its more popular neighbors: Rainier, St. Helens, and Hood in scenic diversity. What sets Mount Adams apart from its neighbors, however, is its vast lava flows (4 major ones), easy off-trail hiking, and fantastic opportunity for solitude.

fee
icy
no shade
rocky
scramble
snow
1 month ago

This climb took place from 8/30 - 9/1/2019. Became ill with diarrhea and nausea at about 7000 feet. Recurred for next 2 days on the mountain. Because of this I climbed slower than my partner and told him to climb on ahead separately from me. I reached high point of about 10,500 feet. Thick clouds, nearly whiteout, and high winds sent me back down. My partner reached the false summit but was turned back by the same conditions. I was injured at about 10,000 feet on descent. Climber about 200 feet above me knocked a bowling ball sized rock down. He yelled "Rock!" and as I turned It was only 40 feet away, coming straight at me. I jumped to the side to get out of the way, but I slipped on the hard icy snow, began a rapid descent on my back, lost my ice axe, and couldn't arrest. Slid about 150 feet angling toward the edge of the slope and smashed into large rocks at a fairly fast speed, hitting my legs, feet and head. Fortunately I was wearing my helmet. This impact stopped my descent. Crawled off the snow and into the rocks and was lost. I hurt all over. Wandered for 20 minutes, maybe more, until climbers from Victoria, BC with first aid skills happened upon me by chance and checked me out and helped me find my tent. I had a cut leg, bruised feet, and lost both big toe nails. Because of the way I was talking and walking the BC climbers felt I might have a concussion. And I became a bit nauseous again later that night. I should've gone to a doctor about my head injury, but I decided not to. The strongest wind I have ever experienced blew in at about 11 pm and didn't back off until 6 am. The tent fabric flapped continuously like a machine gun, and the poles pulled and bent so hard I thought they were going to be yanked out. I crawled out once to tighten the guy lines and the wind almost pushed me over. The next day the USFS climbing ranger at the trailhead told us the wind was clocked at 75 mph. It was now sunny and 80 degrees and the summit was close enough to taunt me. But I was weak and beat up. And I'd been to the summit three times before. It was a hard 3 days for me. I just wanted to go home and sleep.

Beautiful day and conditions on the,mountain. Nf-23 was fine throughout, at its highest point there were a few patches of packed snow but very minor. After ranger station, NF-80 aside from being its usual treacherous self, it had a little snow in just the last 1000 yards or so. Also no biggie. Snow on the trail from the start and that made it some hard going at times.. Multiple...but it was still a better choice than the scree. At about 8500 feet I'd had enough and painstakingly still made my way to upper lunch counter.. Some snow in the sites but easy to setup the tent. Not a single other soul on the mountain. Summit tomorrow.

hiking
4 months ago

I clocked 11.6 miles and 2283 ft and completed it in 3:45 at a fast pace with a few stops for photos. I added in the spur down to Looking Glass Lake which was nice but you need to get all the way around to the far end to get good shots. The hike up to the ridge at about 2 mi is pretty much all uphill. This is followed by a couple hundred ft of downhill that you can’t help but think about for your trip “down”. From there on is where this trail really shines. Creek crossings were easy but can’t imagine what they must be like in late spring. Keep looking over your shoulder because some of the most spectacular views are behind you.

hiking
no shade
off trail
rocky
scramble
snow
4 months ago

Began at 1am with the intention of summiting in one day. Reached the false summit around 10am and turned around due to high winds and cold feet (mine were toasty tyvm). Microspikes/crampons were (sadly) mostly useless because of all the fresh snow, which was sometimes thigh deep. Snow began at 7000'. From 10000' or so, we took the rocks over the snowfield but the snowfield is probably easier and more comfortable. Neither are fun options! Best route is challenging to find, even at lower elevations. It was quite beautiful and well worth the discomfort.

hiking
no shade
rocky
scramble
snow
washed out
4 months ago

backpacking
4 months ago

Had a wonderful 1 night backpacking trip on this trail. I’m a novice backpacker so it was definitely challenging for me, and I was glad I was with someone more experienced! We camped just past Lookingglass Lake and then turned around and went back the next morning. The glacial streams were not too challenging, but one was knee deep when we crossed in the evening. I think I go 2 mosquito bites on the entire trip. Multiple breath-taking views of Mt. Adams and there was a really beautiful meadow along the way. Our dog enjoyed the trip too!

hiking
no shade
rocky
snow
4 months ago

Attempted as a day hike on Sep 2nd. Huge mistake. Some of the worst mountaineering conditions. Summited Mt St-Helens as day hike in winter and Mt Rainier in spring lat year without issue. But yesterday on Mt Adams, the volcanic scree and the snow packs full of sun holes made for slow and difficult progress both going up and down. Left parking area at 0100 hrs and got to false summit at 1010 hrs. Took 6.5 hrs to return. This hike in winter should only take 7 hrs. I only gave two stars due to the trail conditions. Will try again next winter and update the review.

hiking
no shade
off trail
rocky
scramble
snow
4 months ago

I climbed Mount Adams on August 27, 2019 as a day hike. When I arrived at Cold Springs campground, I was greeted by a REALLY nasty wind. This wind blew my tent around all night, and I probably didn’t get as much sleep as I should have. The wind was still blowing hard when I woke up, and I had SERIOUS second thoughts about the climb. But since I had been thinking about the hike for almost a year and had driven up from California to do it, I figured I should at least give it a try. So I started out at about 8:25AM. I know, not an alpine start. But honestly, I never really saw the point of it much of the time. The start of the hike was rough. The wind was not getting any better. And after crossing Morrison Creek, it became a headwind. This is about the same point you REALLY start to climb. So it was a little rough going to say the least. But as I approached the snowfield below the Lunch Counter, the wind started to get calmer. I just might have a nice climb after all! The snowfield was not too bad. I didn’t bring an ice axe or crampons, but I was fine with microspikes and trekking poles. As I climbed the snowfield, I could make out people climbing in the snow up to Pikers Peak. When I got to that point, I avoided the snow and climbed the rock instead. This, of course, was the better choice without an ice axe and crampons. And it actually seemed to go pretty quickly. I wouldn’t say I was disappointed to see how much further I had to go at Pikers Peak, as I knew full well this was a false summit. But the view across the plateau of the glaciated summit was REALLY spectacular. After crossing the plateau and climbing, I found myself at the old lookout. The sky was blue without a single cloud. And winds were calm! One of the cool things about Mount Adams is the SIZE of the summit. This place is HUGE. All in all, I spent a couple of hours exploring and admiring the views of surrounding countryside, peaks like Rainier, Hood, and Saint Helens. Even Mount Baler and the Three Sisters were visible in the distance. The glaciers were also most impressive. All in all, I spent two hours on the summit! The climb down was rather uneventful, even if a little slow going down the rocks to the Lunch Counter. The sun started to set at the bottom of the snowfield, and I got to see an AWESOME sunset over Mount Saint Helens. The rest of the hike was just a peaceful hike in the dark. All in all, I’m GLAD I decided to attempt the summit despite the winds.

hiking
no shade
rocky
scramble
4 months ago

First time on this mountain (Labor Day weekend). Camped on side of mtn Fri nite with brother and nephew about a mile below Lunch Counter. Sat summited and back to parking lot. Trail before Lunch Counter ok. After Lunch Counter harder but doable; climbing up small boulders till Pikers Peak. Simple rest of way till summit. Was windy at summit (25-35mph) but ok. Non-steep snow fields ok to walk across above Pikers Peak and below Lunch Counter without crampons. Lot of people on mountain made it enjoyable to occasionally converse with other climbers and get their “take” on the climb. I am glad to have done it but not sure will do again..... Time will tell. Biggest slow down was between Lunch Counter and Pikers Peak. Like anything worthwhile, it’s value lies in the effort put forth. Definitely will remember this one.:-)

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