hiking

views

dogs on leash

forest

walking

nature trips

birding

wild flowers

wildlife

kid friendly

trail running

lake

horseback riding

river

mountain biking

no dogs

waterfall

camping

backpacking

snowshoeing

dog friendly

fishing

Steep but short. View is truly beautiful.

hiking
1 day ago

Hiked this trail 2 days ago - strenuous but worth the effort! Beautiful views of Hood, Adams and St. Helens. The wildflowers provided a pretty landscape and included larkspur, phlox, daisies, and mini glacier lilies. The pot holes are numerous once you leave Bear Creek road and cross the creek. We saw only one snow bank and it was to the side of the trail. Encountered only one other person on the hike. One of our favorites!

Love it, too early in the year may encounter snow!

backpacking
1 day ago

Horrible. Hiked on May 18-19, 2018 It is very steep and viewless 99% of the time. The steep hike up was ok but the hike down, with a backpack and hiking poles, is scary. Each of us fell multiple times. There are a few good camp sites near the logging road at the top. No water so be prepared.
There are other, much nicer, hikes at Siouxon Falls. Unless you really love solitude and a challenge, avoid Horseshoe Ridge.

This trail is absolutely stunning when you reach the top. It has a good incline but with steady steps and a few breaks it's very doable.

Be prepared for a lot of wind depending on the day. Our visit the wind was shoving us around at the top which can be a bit scary with the drop offs. Keep an eye out for Mountian Goats.

You won't find a better viewpoint though. Pick a sunny day and you'll be completely amazed.

Not a hike for beginners, but a good workout for us 50 something’s in good condition. The trail is mostly well maintained, and easily discernible, but there are some trees blocking the path. No horses could make it very far, and I would not recommend this for young children. It was a great day hike for us, the old growth forest is beautiful, the river about a third of the way in was fascinating, and Glacier Lake is clear, cold, and remote. All in all, it was a great hike.

When you look at parts of this area on Google Maps you can see acre sized clearings of forest that resemble gambling dice. There is a 5, 3 and 2 I’ve observed since satellite maps became public. Only one news article exists regarding the phenomenon, explaining scientists started the ecology experiment in the 90’s. But trees in the clear cut areas seem much older than that. Why is the experiment only happening in this forest? There are no other forestry centers in the world that are doing this. I’ve measured the height of the trees by their shadows and what time of day it was. It doesn’t add up to the 90s clear cutting story and timeline. The Colombian News article is brief and doesn’t site any specific departments, or go into any specifics for that matter. It only mentions generic organizations. There is also a wrecked military plane out there with no back story.

“Researchers from the Pacific Northwest Research Station, the Forest Service, the University of Washington, Oregon State and the University of Oregon all worked or are still working on the project.”

When is the last time you heard of all these organizations working TOGETHER on a specific project of this scale, this well organized? Especially during the 90’s when most of these centers were just starting to get consistent funding. I’ve gone out trying to look for clues as to why these die really exist. The magnetic lava bed makes compasses worthless and gps gets buggy in the valleys. One time a black SUV with 5 men in suits was parked out there. Another time I saw 3-4 black-hooded individuals walking along the logging roads with no transport vehicle for many many miles. They had zero hiking or camping supplies and looked extremely out of place. When asking locals you get mixed reviews.

One armature website briefly mentions the die and assumes it was done by board loggers but the tree growth around it seems to say it was done in the 1930’s or 40s. Given the frequent Hood River logging bank robberies back then I have a theory the acre sized die are laid out to give coordinates to buried loot. With the die totals providing a solvable equation to a safe.

Anybody else smelling a D.B. Cooper type of story? I’ve studied this casually for years but now I need real answers haha. If anyone else is curious or had any strange occurrences out there email me at scott.wray.media@gmail. I may produce a show or documentary about it if other’s have had similar thoughts or curiosities about the clear cut, acre sized dice. Thanks!

I’d definitely do it again but I would forget about Bluff Mountain and just summit Little Baldy and be happy!

I did about 9 miles of this trail (out and back) and it was amazing! Lots of waterfalls, lots of places to climb around the waterfalls and lots of little swimming holes if it's warm enough. The trail was not very hard at all just kinda meanders with no crazy elevation gains. Will definitely take people back here.

hiking
3 days ago

Overall a great experience! Hiked on 5/11/18. We used hiking poles and micro-spikes. Ice axe was helpful for glissading down. Took ~9 hours total -- ~7 hours up, ~2 hours down. Learn from our mistake and put on sunscreen and re-apply :)

Couldn’t get to the trail as there was still a lot of icy snow.

walking
3 days ago

Started at the Horseshoe Bend Rd trailhead. Followed from there for about 3.5 miles. The trail will take you through some “interesting” sections with private property on both sides, before gradually turning back to nature again. Avoid the parsley looking plants growing everywhere along and in the path, it is often full of ticks. Have a dog? I would avoid this trail (area) unless your idea of bonding with your animal is tick removal. The following day we hit the same trail, further down, starting at the Harms Rd trailhead, for more of a great desert canyon stretch of trail. Both sections are flat, as they used to have train tracks running there. Still a beautiful walk. Again, be prepared for ticks, people aren’t making that up.

What a great hike! Steep and short. Still had a little snow , but nothing to bad. Great view at the top, we hiked through the cloud later and came out to sun and views !

Beautiful, crystal clear water!

Fun hike! Chinook Creek Falls was a beauty!

Purcell Mountain Trail #284
5-19-18

There are two trails to Purcell Mountain Lookout. Trail #285 (via FR63) and Trail #284 with access from Hwy 12. An access trail from Hwy 12 to trail #284 made it much easier to get to. This access trail was made within the last month or so. Yesterday I was finally able to hike it. Trail #284 is the longer of the two trails at 7.7 miles one-way. The shorter trail is 4.2 one-way and as TR’s indicate, the one accessed more, overgrown and hard to get to.

There is parking in a pullout across Hwy 12 or on the same side next to the access trail. The access trail is sandy and inconspicuously meets trail #284, so much so that I missed it on the way back. It is steep right from the get go. Trail #284 is just as steep and overgrown in the first miles. Actually the whole trail is overgrown but lower parts are worse.

There has been some recent maintenance as blowdowns are cut and one blowdown was routed around. This trail is all elevation gain, right from the start. Only one flat-ish spot around the 3100ft level makes a good resting point. From here it continues elevation gain but not as steep and starts resembling a regular trail. Pleasant actually.

First signs of snow were at 3700ft but only one spot. It was clear for the next .7 miles til after a trail junction marked by an old non-used barbed-wire gate. Right is the Purcell Mountain Trail, left goes toward a location unknown to me. After I got back, I found out it goes toward Grassy Mountain and not marked on any maps I could find. This is also the first signs of water on the trail.

Take the left junction a hundred feet for a nicely flowing stream, 4.3 miles in at 4011ft. Go right to stay on the Purcell Mountain trail. I got blocked by snow 200-300 feet after the junction. It was constant and I lost sight of the trail. I took the left junction to see where it went and turned around after it appeared to be going more down than up and away from where I wanted to go, Elevation, 4100ft. Elevation gain to this point, 3228ft in 4.9mi.

Going down was a much needed reward and fast! 1.75hrs total going down. 5hrs going up. It seemed there were more tripping…. hazards going down than up. From rocks to round twigs to small branches crossing the trail and rain and wet. It rained going down which made an overgrown trail soaking.

All and All this is an exciting and strenuous trail. It’s easy to get to. Leave early and plan on 15 miles RT. There are no views however… they come later (I hope). Only 1 flowing water source on the trail 4.3 miles in and this could be seasonal, but I suspect one of the many that feeds Hopkins Creek. Plan accordingly. I will certainly be doing this later I the year.

Holy cow that was amazing!! Definitely worth makeing it to the upper falls

This is a good short hike just over 2 miles and small side trail to cool rock formation with forest and river view. this trail is a little steep!

Absolutely incredible views! Steeper than I expected in the beginning and tons of rocks to overcome but worth every single bit of the views. Phenomenal!

Beautiful hike, pretty easy. I would suggest the completing the loop. You will not be right on the river for half of it if you do but the forest is beautiful!

5/16/18. The roads leading to this trailhead, and to various other locations in the Gifford Pinchot NP, are closed for ‘no snow management’.

Such a beautiful hike!!!

It's a teeny bit scary but definitely use the ropes to get to the bottom--100% worth it!!!! Hardly anybody there, so so beautiful and close to the road.

A splendid day hike or overnighter with hammocks. Beautifully graded trail.

Trail is beautiful, incline after Covel Falls is where it becomes hard, but Angel Falls is totally worth the incline! Some trail signs are missing, but they are working on replacing them. Over all a great trail and the waterfalls are worth it!

Take the trail across the parking lot from the toilet, not the Tarbell trail next to the toilet. The Tarbell bridge is pretty much in the river and you can’t cross it so the trail is useless.
Hurray for poles!!! If you’ve got them, it’s definitely worth bringing them.
Take a right at the big rock pile when you get closer to the top.
Views of Mt. St. Helens, Rainier, Adams and Hood!
Also, if you’re coming from Portland and don’t have AWD and decent clearance you should opt for the route via Washougal.

hiking
11 days ago

Hiked 05/13/18, went up to see the sunset.

Ticks and poison oak! Only made it a mile in (hiking with a three year old), and my dog had two ticks on him before we made it back to our car. Huge buggers, might I add. We all had bug spray on us as well, and this apparently did not deter them. I will not be returning to finish the hike like I had hoped.

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