As early as 1704, Native Americans and the French were using routes through Groton to reach Canada and Massachusetts. Colonists settled this area of Vermont slightly earlier than the rest of the State as a result of the accessible network of waterways. The rocky, hillsides were originally cloaked in white pine, spruce, hemlock, beech, maple and birch. These were logged by local farmers for lumber, fuel and potash. The logging industry was large-scale for almost 100 years while the railroad operated. Today, logging is still a vital industry but has lost its dominance in favor of modern societys leisure culture: private cottages/seasonal homes; park development; and a variety of outdoor recreation activities. Groton State Forest, with over 26,000 acres, is the second largest land block administered by the Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation. The forest contains over 17 miles of hiking trails and over 20 miles of gravel roads and multi-use trails suitable for mountain biking and horseback riding. The campground has 62 tent/trailer sites and 17 lean-tos. All rest rooms include hot showers ($). A sanitary dump station is available, but no hookups. There is a swimming beach, boat launch/dock facility, play area, shelter, and access to miles of hiking trails. The Groton Nature Center is within walking distance.

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