Looking for a great trail in Mount Olympus Wilderness, Utah? AllTrails has 25 great hiking trails, trail running trails, views trails and more, with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers, and nature lovers like you. Ready for some activity? There are 11 moderate trails in Mount Olympus Wilderness ranging from 2.3 to 9.8 miles and from 4,849 to 9,678 feet above sea level. Start checking them out and you'll be out on the trail in no time!

hiking

views

nature trips

forest

wild flowers

bird watching

wildlife

trail running

walking

no dogs

snowshoeing

cross country skiing

river

dogs on leash

The Mount Olympus Wilderness was established by Congress in 1984 with the passage of the Utah Wilderness Act. Located within the central Wasatch range, the Mount Olympus Wilderness consists of approximately 15,856 acres and is generally bounded on the north by Mill Creek Canyon, on the south by Big Cottonwood Canyon, on the west by the Salt Lake Valley, and on the east by Gobbler's Knob, Alexander Basin, and Dog Lake. The portion in Big Cottonwood Canyon falls under Salt Lake City watershed restrictions. Photo of a Mount Olympus Wilderness sign.There are several entry points in each canyon and along the Front as well. They include the following: Mount Olympus Trail and Neff's Canyon from the benches along the front; Thayne's Canyon, Porter Fork (private road), Bowman Fork, and Alexander Basin on the northern or Mill Creek Canyon side; and Mill B North Fork and Butler Fork on the south side from Big Cottonwood Canyon. You can also enter the Wilderness about a quarter of a mile west of Dog Lake. The Dog Lake entry receives most of the mountain bicycle violations. Bicyclist like to ride the Desolation Trail to the Mill A Basin Trail and out or exit the forest by way of Butler Fork. Due to the fact that there are no lakes in this Wilderness, it is not used as much for overnight camping. You will also see a little less use here in general except for the increasing problem with mountain bikes (mountain bikes are not allowed in wilderness areas). The Mount Olympus Wilderness provides a spectacular backdrop for the Salt Lake Valley and is dominated by rugged terrain, narrow canyons, and high peaks, including Mount Olympus, Mount Raymond, and Gobbler's Knob. The geologic structure of the area is varied and complex, consisting of granitoid rock masses and several sedimentary formations. Carving of the present alpine topography is due to glaciation with erosion the current dominant force in the land sculpturing process. Much of the higher elevation is alpine, characterized by large, open cirque basins, and exposed rocky ridges. Vegetation includes dense mountain brush mixed with sagebrush and grass. Patches of various firs and aspen are common in isolated patches on north facing slopes. Snow remains in some areas until mid-summer. To preserve and protect the physical and aesthetic environment, National Forest wilderness areas are closed to motor vehicles, mechanized equipment, hang gliders, and bicycles. In addition, parts of this wilderness lay within the culinary watershed for Salt Lake County and special restrictions concerning camping, swimming, and domestic animals apply. Please help protect wilderness for future generations by learning and practicing "No-Trace" camping and hiking techniques. The following acts are prohibited in the Mount Olympus Wilderness Area: Group sizes exceeding 10 persons, camping within 200 feet of lakes, streams, springs, or other water sources, camping within 200 feet of trails, camping for more than 3 days at one site, short cutting a trail switchback, and disposing of garbage, debris, or other waste.

Beautiful hike. Did it early spring without poles/spikes, challenging but totally doable.

hiking
snow
10 days ago

Holy moly. This trail becomes an entirely different beast in the snow. Spikes and poles are a must. Snowshoes will be helpful closer to the summit, although the narrow trail and steep incline makes them a little bit cumbersome. We made it about .3 miles from the peak, after battling thigh-high snow drifts and high winds for about 20 minutes before throwing in the towel. The views are incredible, but boy do you have to work for them. I’d love to do this hike again in the spring/summer to fully enjoy everything it has to offer.

hiking
muddy
snow
22 days ago

snowshoeing
snow
26 days ago

Great views at the top! Just awesome in the winter. Shocked I was the only one up there on a Saturday afternoon. You will see ski tracks going off the top...amazing. The last half mile deserves snowshoes and is strenuous in the winter. You could use either micro spikes or snowshoes for the first couple miles depending on how packed the trail is.

It's a steep hike that offers really cool views of the Salt Lake Valley. Not one of my favourites as there's no waterfalls, rivers or lakes to look at. It is doable in winter and I enjoyed myself over all, but it is exhausting fighting all that snow and it delays you. Make sure you have more time than you think you need before sunset. It's dangerous with light-hearted sliding down the steep, slick trail.

went yesterday. this is right off the road, just a few steps up the gully. it's mostly frozen over. so glad I had my spikes on. the trail right now goes right up on top of the frozen creek, so be careful on the ice. very pretty! cant wait to go back in the spring!

Went after fresh snow. So pretty. Going up with micro spikes was a good idea. We only went .5 mile up as it was getting dark. Hope to go back sometime to finish the trail. Great views!

Pretty waterfall. Super short hike. It took me longer to cross the road at the S curve than actually hike to the falls. I went left after crossing the road and starting into the trail. I followed the footprints in the snow, and they crossed the river to the left hand side , but you can't get too close on that side, and then they went back and crossed to the right hand side and got really close to the falls. It was a little stressful crossing the snow covered stream and hoping the ice is solid underneath, but I kept using my sticks to make sure it was solid and it was pretty hard. I did a 360 degree StreetView trail here, if you want to view it, it is on Google Earth, and my blog https://www.shaunasadventures.com/2019/01/360-adventure-hidden-falls-and-mill-b.html?m=1.
It was nice to pair it with walking up Mill B trail to the picnic area for the river is so pretty and it is right there.
I have to add that even though this was a nice hike, they don't plow the parking lots so parking is stressful along the road. Also, I had to drive about 10-15 minutes up the road to finally find a safe place to turn around when I wanted to go home. I saw people stuck trying to turn around in not safe spots, and I felt so bad for them, but I was terrified of helping and getting stuck myself. Just FYI.

Hiked before a snowstorm hit on December 30th. Kind of wish I’d taken the East trail as the West seemed to have deeper snow..It was a slog through all of the snow and definitely would recommend setting aside 3-4 hours at least in the winter to summit. Powder levels at the summit were almost 4 feet and deeper in some areas so you really have to watch your step and the coming back down was slippery. Microspikes and waterproof spray for boots/water resistant boots are a must this time of year. Want to hike in the summer now.

hiking
1 month ago

This is a great little walk. The falls are easy to get to and it is a beautiful area. It is great in the summer and amazing in the winter.

Easy for families, even those with young kids.

Hard and exhausting, but highly rewarding!

Excellent Winter Summit!

Would like to come back with my snowboard, lot's of powder runs calling my name ...

Hiked everything except the last climb to Gobblers Knob on separate hikes. Nice view of the Wasatch Mountains to the south.

Great little hike. Fair bit of snow in some sections — post-holed it through those. Glad I brought spikes/gaiters/poles. After about a mile, no other human tracks on the trail. Did see moose, deer, and lynx (or small mountain lion) tracks along the trail for ¾ mile though. Stunning views from the overlook.

trail running
2 months ago

This is absolutely one my All Time favorite summits in Utah. I love it because it’s steep and relatively a short 3.3 mile to the top. My personal record to the summit stands at 1 hour 37 min and little under 41 mins to run back down to the trailhead. As of December 8th, I have summited Mt. Olympus 16 times in 2018.

hiking
2 months ago

I went up here with my family this summer. Only a 2-minute walk to a pretty cool waterfall. Super quick and easy, but super fun too!

hiking
3 months ago

I did this hike as a prep hike the weekend before I did Mt. Whitney. It was my first time doing it even though I have hiked all over the Wasatch Front. I was amazed at how majestic this hike is from beginning to end. It's a great hike to do in the late fall and early winter because it starts at a relatively low elevation compared to most other hikes near Salt Lake City/Sandy, Utah. As such there was little to no snow on the trail. I did it in about 5.5 hours (around 3 hours up, 2.5 hours down).

On the last quarterish mile scramble to the summit, I got misdirected and started ascending the wrong way. Luckily, a dude set me in the right direction (thanks Stu!) and I got to the summit to take in the preposterous views of Salt Lake Valley. Early on in the hike, it also forks and one prong of that fork goes down the Bonneville Shoreline Trail. I walked down that trail for a few hundred meters before I realized my error (thanks to the AllTrails app).

I highly recommend this hike.

Loved every second, on the way up at least

I planned to hike the church fork route from the east, but did not specify to Google maps, which took me to this trailhead. With limited time before my flight left, I decided to go for it. It was unrelentingly steep for sure, but not overwhelmingly. The afternoon sunlight on the golden grass and city view made it worth it. The east route was likely cold in the shade. Being from Michigan, a handful of breaks were need to catch my breath. It was a cool experience, but will likely explore other options the next visit to SLC.

Found a sport dog field trainer thing on the trail. find me on Instagram @savethenegs to retrieve it.

No snow until you begin moving up Raymond past the saddle. No spikes or yaks needed at this point, but my poles were quite helpful as snow increased with the climb. It was a gorgeous day and the snow was grainy and easy to hike early on. Things did get slippery and spikes are recommended once you get to the ridgeline at least. Pretty deep but the foot path was packed in some areas. Postholing along some parts, so gaiters are recommended too.

Short but falls were hidden so couldn’t view.

Spectacular view of the SLC valley! A great Halloween hike!
Dress warm ❄️

Holy crap what a trail!!! Very rewarding and yet hard , not for the fainted heart! Did this hike on Halloween day, you may see snow towards mile 3 once you get to first summit it’s all dried! Lot of people on the trail. Made it to top in 3 hours plus about half hour for breaks and picture takes, coming down was also a little challenging because of the snow that melted and now it was slushy, def hiking poles . Coming down took me 2 hrs.
Layer up as it’s very cold on the scramble area if sun is not out. Happy hiking!

Great views at the top, tough going getting there. SO STEEP, but I would still recommend. I went up around 4:30 and came down just in time to see the sun setting.

The trail was a bit muddy in places but still very hikable in late October. Note that the total distance is about 4 miles from the closed gate (out and back) with an elevation gain of about 1,500 ft. Also, this distance does not go to White Fir Pass. Judging from the map attached with this trail, it goes to the first outlook, which is about half the distance to White Fir Pass. This is also a beautiful winter hike if you wear snow cleats.

trail running
3 months ago

sweet trail, beautiful views.

Snow is all gone as of yesterday. Incredibly steep but rewarding trail! The scramble wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. Have shoes with good grip!

hiking
3 months ago

Hiked up Thaynes canyon and then turned onto Desolation. Thaynes Canyon is very shaded given that it is north facing plus the fact that you are going up the gut of the canyon so the steep mountain ridges and trees acts as a canopy. It is not the most entertaining hike because there are no views on the way up plus it is a pretty steep climb for 2 miles. Once you get above 8000 feet - the views improve as you look North at Grandeur and Mt. Aire. The finally push up the summit of Thaynes Peak is very, very steep. You gain 700 feet in about 1/4 mile but it is not technical (no scrambling required). The views at the peak are solid with views of SLC, Grandeur, Mt Aire, Gobblers and Mt Raymond. It was about 6 miles round trip.

hiking
3 months ago

Well worth it! The views are outstanding! We consider ourselves pretty fast hikers, but this is a continuous incline that feels like you're on a stair-master at the gym. Roughly 7 miles round trip took us 5.5 hours total (4.5 hours moving 1 hour of breaks and pictures). We're not "climbers" and we had no problem with the "scramble" after the saddle. October 27, 2018 no snow on the trail.

The start was very rocky and not what I was expecting. Once you make the turn towards the creek, it’s beautiful. The elevation gain was slow and steady. Some parts are over grown do your not sure where exactly the trail leads. Would go again in the spring.

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